SSRI ANTIDEPRESSANT: 2008 Finnish School Shooting: 10 Dead

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): Although this is
a poor automatic translation of the document you can tell by what is translated
that it was found that as the large majority of school shooter, this shooter was
on an SSRI antidepressant when he shot himself and 10 others in the Finish
school shooting in September of 2008.

___________________________
On September 23, 2008, at Kauhajoki in Finland, a 22 year old
culinary student named Matti Saari shot and killed ten students before
killing himself.
The official report on the shooting has been released
by the Finnish Ministry and on page 58 of that report [PDF file] it states that
Matti Saari was taking an
SSRI medicinal product and
also a benzodiazepine.

Following the official report is
another newspaper report attached to this email which also explains about the

SSRI.

Automatically translated from Finnish into
English.
——————————————————————————————————————–
Page
58 reads:  “Copies terveyskeskuslääkäri was ordered medicines at the
request of depressiohoitajan
are (ssri– medicinal product) that
ahdistuskohtauksiin (alpratsolaami) patients nothing
themselves.
ahdistuskohtaukset and paniikkihäiriöt esiintymistilanteisiin and
related, social situations
that well alone. verkostokartoituksessa months
before taking any
factor network has proved to be quite a present. Apparently
factor which
medicines used properly and in any case, we had hoitomyönteinen
use and open. However, he has avoided katsekontaktia depressiohoitajaan.
hoitokontakti retained until an act, but factor will act was passed on a Friday
meeting agreed later.”

http://www.om.fi/Satellite?blobtable=MungoBlobs&blobcol=urldata&SSURIapptype=BlobServer&SSURIcontainer=Default&SSURIsession=false&blobkey=id&blobheadervalue1=inline ; filename=OMSO 11_2010 Selvitys_180 s.pdf&SSURIsscontext=Satellite
Server&blobwhere=1266333385256&blobheadername1=Content-Disposition&ssbinary=true&blobheader=application/pdf
——————————————————————————————————————–
http://www.savonsanomat.fi/teemat/kauhajoki/koulusurmaajan-l%C3%A4%C3%A4kityst%C3%A4-ei-suositella-nuorille-yhdysvalloissa/534656

koulusurmaajan medication aggression
ssri

may increase does not recommend medicinal products in the United
States
a young people a 04: 03 (last 08: 08)
figure: anu
Mattila
kauhajoella ten people in 2008 and itself was fired by Matti
Saari
mielenterveysongelmiinsa tried to obtain aid until
13-age.

freija metsähalme

kauhajoen koulusurmaaja Matti island
ssri– ate are medicinal product which is not in the United States to recommend
to less than 18 years of age.

ssri– medicines are available in the wider
young people in Finland.

-according to the studies uncontrolled use of
medicinal products ssri– aggression and may increase itsetuhoisia incentives.
These medicinal products should always be used only under medical supervision.
under 15 years of age should be a specialist, under the supervision Kuopion
university hospital (PCA) nuorisopsykiatrian Professor Päivikki laukkanen
says.

Island psyykelääkityksen had nothing ever in specialised
doctors

terveyskeskuslääkäri was ordered him on request. medication
depressiohoitajan the medicinal product ssri– grant ate ahdistuskohtauksiin
another medicinal product.

22-year-old island
kauhajoella killed in September 2008 and itself ten
people.

753 total views, 1 views today

JAMA: Mild to severe depression better treated with alternatives to medications

Last month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients
with very severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild
to severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


From: nandtbearden@yahoo.com
To: ,
ssri-crusaders@yahoogroups.com, atypical_antipsychotics@yahoogroups.com,
atracyphd2@aol.com
Sent: 2/14/2010 8:12:09 A.M. Central Standard
Time
Subj: Even when treated, depression costs employers

http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/mobile/m/FullArticle/eUK/CHLTUK/nhealthNews_uUKTRE6183DO20100209

Even
when treated, depression costs employers
Tue, 09 Feb 20:05 PM
GMT

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Workers with depression stay home
sick more often than healthy colleagues, even when their disease is treated,
according to a Thomson Reuters report released on Tuesday.

The report,
commissioned by drug maker Sanofi Aventis, suggests that employers would
benefit from better treatments of their workers for depression. Depression is
the leading cause of disability among Americans aged 15 to 44, according to
the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Even when depressed patients
are treated with antidepressants, there are substantial productivity losses.
Therapies that can better manage depression may provide opportunities for
savings to employers,” the Thomson Reuters research team wrote in the Journal
of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Despite the widely
acknowledged effectiveness of antidepressant therapy, productivity costs
related to depression persist even after patients receive treatment,” Suellen
Curkendall, director of outcomes research at Thomson Reuters, said in a
statement.

“This may be due to the fact that patients often don’t
respond to the first type of antidepressant that they are prescribed. They
also may fail to take their medications on a regular basis,” added Curkendall,
who led the study.

Curkendall and colleagues analyzed insurance claims
and employee health and productivity data for more than 22,000 patients
treated with antidepressants and compared them to people without
depression.

Workers who had been treated for depression were twice as
likely as others to use short-term disability leave, they found.
Disability-related costs for a year, on average, were $1,038 for patients
treated for depression and $325 for the non-depressed workers.

“Over 40
percent of patients with depression were diagnosed with at least one of the
other included psychiatric conditions besides depression,” the researchers at
Thomson Reuters, parent company of Reuters, added.

Most common were
anxiety, dissociative and so-called somatoform disorders — a group of
disorders with physical symptoms but no apparent physical cause.

Last
month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients with very
severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild to
severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

At least 27 million Americans take antidepressants and
more than 164 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written in 2008,
totaling nearly $10 billion in U.S. sales and $20 billion globally, according
to IMS Health.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox, editing by Jackie
Frank)
Sent via BlackBerry by
AT&T

434 total views, 1 views today

SARAFEM (PROZAC) & ROBITUSSIN: Brittany Murphy Dies Suddenly: CA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy
(
www.drugawareness.org): Brittany
Murphy died from the use of multiple serotonergic medications – meds that
increase serotonin. She may have had pneumonia, but pneumonia does not kill that
quickly. There were clearly other contributing factors when death is so sudden
and without much warning.

When Heidi Connelly published her information on Fen-Phen and Redux causing
heart valve problems (something Brittany already suffered from) she found that
it was the elevated levels of serotonin produced by the Fen-Phen and Redux that
caused a gummy gooey glossy substance to build up on the heart valves and keep
them from shutting properly. So if Brittany‘s heart valve already did not shut
properly and you raise her serotonin levels with two serotonergic drugs – Prozac(Sarafem) and Robitussin you build the level of gummy gooey glossy substance on
that heart valve and you are in trouble.

But beyond that the increase in serotonin constricts muscle tissue
restricting air into the lungs, blood flow throughout the body, etc. – all the
major organs are constricted by elevated serotonin. When the serotonin level
gets too high (as it does when you mix two meds that increase it) you produce
death via multiple organ failure. This is what killed Daniel, Anna Nicole
Smith’s young son. It is called Serotonin Syndrome.
So, in Brittany‘s case I firmly believe that the elevated serotonin
produced by these drugs put the nail in her coffin.
Paragraph four reads:  “Investigators found prescription
medication for depression, seizures, anxiety and pain. Monjack told Lauer his
late wife used Vicoprofen and Sarafem during her menstrual
cycle. ‘”Most of the medications are mine. I suffer from seizures,’
Monjack declared. The screenwriter began to stutter and added,  ‘I suffer
from, you know, heart… my heart stopped on December 3rd when we landed from
Puerto Rico’.”
SSRI Stories note:  Sarafem is, molecule for
molecule, the same exact drug as Prozac.  It goes by a different name
because it is registered with the FDA for use in PMS.

http://extratv.warnerbros.com/2010/01/brittany_murphys_family_continues_to_deny_drug_rumors.php

Brittany
Murphy‘s Family Continues to Deny Drug Rumors

Posted on January 21, 2010Brittany Murphy‘s
husband and mother sat down with Matt Lauer on the “Today” show to
discuss the actress’ sudden death.

Murphy

died Dec. 20, and the cause of death is still unknown; toxicology
results
are expected in a few weeks.

“Let’s set the record straight
once and for all — Brittany was not taking any medication for her mood, for
anorexia,” Murphy‘s husband Simon Monjack said. “It’s utterly ridiculous
that these rumors have perpetuated.”

Investigators found prescription
medication for depression, seizures, anxiety and pain. Monjack told Lauer his
late wife used Vicoprofen and Sarafem during her menstrual cycle. “Most of the
medications are mine. I suffer from seizures,” Monjack declared. The
screenwriter began to stutter and added, “I suffer from, you know, heart… my
heart stopped on December 3rd when we landed from Puerto Rico.”

See

Brittany‘s life in photos

Murphy‘s mother Sharon began to
shake her head when Lauer asked about Brittany‘s rumored cocaine use. “It’s just
so horrific. She was diagnosed with a heart murmur when she was a young teenager
and she was terrified of anything happening to her. She never did any drugs,
ever.” Sharon replied.

The two also denied Brittany had any type of
eating disorder. “You just need to go to her favorite restaurant, Chateau
Marmont, and speak to any waiter, who would tell you that she would happily
order four plates of food and eat them all,” Monjack stated.

Monjack
also claims Murphy‘s role in “Happy Feet 2” was pulled and it broke her heart.
He explained, “Hollywood is a village and once you upset the villagers they talk
and they gossip and they rumor. They have blood on their hands, and I hope they
wash them with very hot water because of the way they treated Brittany Murphy

while she was alive.”

The grieving husband and mother have established The Brittany Murphy
Foundation
in her memory.

900 total views, no views today

LEXAPRO: Caused Mania: Man Died After Being Pepper Sprayed 10 TIMES!: FL

Paragraphs 36 through 38 read:  “His doctors had
prescribed Lexapro
for his depression
and Joyce blames the
medication for his high and low mood swings. Patients on
Lexapro report mood
swings
and paranoia among a host of side effects, so it is advised patients
gradually withdraw from the drug.””

His
doctor had planned to take him off the drug,
but she says her husband’s
medical surveillance fell between the cracks when the doctor left to work
somewhere else.”

In the meantime, while in Ohio, Christie was planning to
paint the garage floor and take apart, clean, and re-assemble lawn furniture. He
had become more outgoing and talkative, she said. When he suddenly left
to go to Fort Myers to visit his brother, he went to a mall and opened
a department store account, things he hadn’t done
before.

Paragraphs ten trhough twelve from the end read:

“Christie ended up at a North Fort Myers hotel. He was initially arrested for
disorderly intoxication and causing a disturbance.
The
counter woman at Arby’s gave Nick a free coffee because she thought he had
Alzheimer’s disease.

Joyce says her husband couldn’t
remember her number, or his son’s.
Two days later on March 27, he was
arrested again for trespassing.

This time when officers took her husband
into custody, Joyce says they locked his medications in his truck and never
retrieved them.

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories note:
Amnesia is listed as a frequent side effect to
antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference. Alcohol cravings are also
known to be caused by antidepressants, as is mania and
violence.

http://www.injuryboard.com/national-news/peppersprayedman-dies-in-jail-what-happened-to-nick-christie-.aspx?googleid=277120

Federal Lawsuit
Pending

The widow of an Ohio man who died in police custody in Fort
Myers, Florida last March, will file a federal lawsuit for violating her
husband’s constitutional rights by failing to recognize that he was mentally
ill.

Joyce Christie, of Girard, Ohio, and her son, plan to file the
action against the Lee County Sheriff’s Office and Prison Health Services (PHS),
the private company that oversees medical care for the jail, which had taken
custody of Nicholas Christie for trespassing.

Her attorney, Nick DiCello
(IB member), of the Cleveland firm of Spangenberg, Shibley & Liber LLP, says
his firm has filed the notices required under Florida state law of an intention
to sue.

“Letters of intent to file a civil lawsuit for medical
malpractice, wrongful death, and civil rights violations, negligence, pain and
suffering have been sent,” he tells IB
News.

Christie, 62, was arrested last March after traveling from Ohio
to Fort Myers while suffering, what his widow describes as a mental breakdown
[manic reaction to medication]. Arrested twice for disorderly conduct and
trespassing, Nick Christie was pepper sprayed ten times over the course of his
43-hour custody.

Suffering from emphysema, COPD, back and heart problems,
the jail staff said his medical files were not available or immediately sought
at the time of his arrest. But DiCello says Christie gave his medical history
and list of medications to the jail days earlier during his first encounter with
law enforcement.

His medication list was found in the back pocket of his
pants when Christie’s personal effects were returned to his
widow.

What Happened To Nick
Christie?

Sometime between the time he was arrested on March 27, 2009
around 2:00 p.m., and March 31 at1:23 p.m. when he was pronounced dead, Christie
had been sprayed with ten blasts of pepper spray, also known as OC (Oleo-resin
Capsicum), which is a derivative of cayenne pepper.

The medical examiner
has ruled his death a homicide.

On January 6, the Lee County State
Attorney’s office mimicked a lengthy investigation by the Lee County Sheriff’s
Office, clearing the officers of any wrongdoing in the death.

Assistant
State Attorney Dean Plattner and Chief Investigator Kevin Smith found the
jailers did not break policy guidelines. A separate internal review of policy
was not conducted and the five corrections officers have remained on the
job.

“My blood is boiling,” Joyce Christie, 59, told the News-Press. “I knew it was going to end this way
because the corrections officers were never taken off their jobs during the
investigation.”

A Failure to
Indict

Assistant State Attorney Dean Plattner says in his memo that
in order to prove manslaughter, the office would have to prove someone showed a
“reckless disregard for human life” to the extent that they should have known it
would likely cause death or great bodily injury.

“The facts of the case
do not support this level of proof,” says the office.

Attorney DiCello
says he is shocked that the state attorney didn’t come to the conclusion there
was a crime.

“All he needs to come to a conclusion that there was
probable cause there was a crime. The local community should have been given the
opportunity to indict. They weren’t given that opportunity,” he
says.

DiCello says despite the state attorney’s conclusion, the federal
case has a different standard of review.

“They have to prove beyond a
reasonable doubt there was some type of criminal intent. We have to prove it
fell beneath the standard of care and these officers knew they were violating
this man’s constitutional rights.”

DiCello says strapping an obese,
62-year-old with a heart condition and COPD to a restraining chair, pepper

spraying him and not allowing him water to wash off should qualify.

“Case
law as a matter of law defines that conduct as a violation of constitutional
rights and affords it no protection under the law,” he says.

The standard
of care is established by the county and Prison Health Services, under contract
with Lee County for $9 million annually, one of 160 contracts PHS holds
nationwide.

Lee County, Sgt. David Valez, tells IB News the
company is NCCHC accredited and “they must maintain that high standard.” There
is no independent review by the county.

Under the contract, PHS is
responsible for conducting a medical evaluation of everyone coming into the
system.

Never Saw A Doctor

His jailers
say Nicholas Christie was combative, despite the fact that he was restrained in
a chair so he allegedly wouldn’t spit at his jailers.

But three inmates
who shared Christie’s cell block told the Fort Meyers News-Press that they thought the use
of pepper spray was excessive and that deputies ignored the victim’s pleas for
help.

“While he was sitting in the chair, they sprayed him two more
times,” said Ken Cutler. His whole head was turning purple and almost blue,” he
says, “He was gasping.”

The other inmates say the pepper spray was so
intense they were gagging in the cell block.

“He was constantly telling
them I can’t breathe and I got a heart condition,” he says.

Dr. Robert
Pfalzgraf, deputy chief medical examiner, concluded that stress caused by
restraint and pepper spray were irritants and stressors to his heart. He says
that 99 percent of the time those sprayed do not die. Christie was the 1
percent.

The medical examiner’s report indicates that the death was

caused by “hypoxic encephalopathy following resuscitation for cardiac arrest,
cardiac shock with congestive heart failure, physiologic stress following
restraint and noxious effects of oleoresin capsicum.”

A homicide does not
necessarily mean that the death was a criminal act only that it was caused by a
person or persons.

DiCello says take a look at Pepper Spray on YouTube videos to see it can down
someone for 40 minutes, even if it is washed off.

“You’ll see Marines
crying, now imagine being sprayed ten times, you’re obese, have COPD and having
a manic episode. Ten times and the last time not washed down for a half hour
strapped down so you can’t rub his eyes.”

Mental
Health Issues

Joyce Christie told IB News last June that her
husband had started showing signs of mania. He had recently retired and thought
he was going to go fishing, she said, but diverticulitis shut down his colon,
then he went into a depression after being hospitalized for COPD ( chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Christie had quit smoking years ago, but the former boilermaker worked
around asbestos and nuclear power plants, she says.

His doctors had
prescribed Lexapro for his depression and Joyce blames the
medication for his high and low mood swings. Patients on Lexapro report

mood
swings
and paranoia among a host of side effects, so it is advised patients
gradually withdraw from the drug.

His doctor had planned to take him off
the drug, but she says her husband’s medical surveillance fell between the
cracks when the doctor left to work somewhere else.

In the meantime,
while in Ohio, Christie was planning to paint the garage floor and take apart,
clean, and re-assemble lawn furniture. He had become more outgoing and
talkative, she said. When he suddenly left to go to Fort Myers to visit his
brother, he went to a mall and opened a department store account, things he
hadn’t done before.

Joyce Christie was so concerned she says she
contacted the Lee County Sheriff’s office and issue a welfare BOLO (Be On The
Lookout). Ms. Christie even had the sheriff of her home town contact Lee County
to stress the seriousness of her husband’s condition and the fact that he needed
to take his medication.

“He begged them to take Nick to the hospital.
They said he’s having a good time, he needs a few days away. All they had to do
was say ‘Let us talk to your doctor to confirm.’ They didn’t do it. Captain
Begowski told the officer, ‘If you don’t take him now, I’m going to tell you,
you’re going to be dealing with him in a couple of hours.’”

That forecast
proved true.

Christie ended up at a North Fort Myers hotel. He was
initially arrested for disorderly intoxication and causing a disturbance. The
counter woman at Arby’s gave Nick a free coffee because she thought he had
Alzheimer’s disease.

Joyce says her husband couldn’t remember her number,
or his son’s. Two days later on March 27, he was arrested again for
trespassing.

This time when officers took her husband into custody, Joyce
says they locked his medications in his truck and never retrieved
them.

Joyce frantically flew to Fort Myers March 28, but police would not
let her see Nick. She says they wouldn’t even tell him she was there. Finally,
an officer suggested she could bond him out of police custody.

When she
finally was allowed to see her husband it was too late.

He had been taken
by ambulance to Gulf Coast Hospital where Joyce says Nick’s eyes were taped shut
and he had 40 tubes taped to his body. Doctors told her he had a 10 percent
chance to live. The nurses told her when he was brought in naked that he had so
much pepper spray on him doctors had to change their gloves as they became
saturated with the orange spray.

No one in the sheriff’s office had
contacted her, and until he arrived at the hospital, Nick Christie had never
seen a doctor. Someone in the hospital, shocked by his condition, suggested she
contact an attorney.

“Nick had a life he was somebody my husband, a
father to my son. He’s somebody I miss very much. It shouldn’t have happened. He
should be here. Three weeks later I get his ashes back from Florida in a mail
truck. My husband, he was somebody, he wasn’t just a nobody,” Joyce Christie
says.

Attorney Nick DiCello says the state attorney’s report clearing the
officers will not hurt the federal case. The fact that Christie was sprayed at
least once after being restrained in a chair with a hood over his head violates
any qualified immunity defense the county and Prison Health Services may
claim.

Besides a violation of the law, DiCello is concerned about the
violation of another human being.

“Humanity has failed here. And now they
aren’t going to address the failure. Us as a people, we need to recognize we’ve
all failed and make it right, not ‘Let’s just move on from this failure.’ People
shouldn’t do this to people. Nothing could warrant the treatment and death this
guy experienced.

“A 62-yr-old retiree strapped to a chair and died. I
don’t get it.” #

639 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Policeman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs four through seven read:  “In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick became
violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After swearing
at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived, overturned
furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a picture
frame and fought with his wife.”

“The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of
Scotch.”

“But it was when he was told he was being arrested later that
evening that Gulick went ballistic.”

“Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but
overall calm situation quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick
fought back.”

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories Note:  The
Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
and the antidepressant
in the human body.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2010/01/12/12428306-qmi.html

Violent cop acted ‘superhuman’

Constable pleads guilty
to discreditable conduct at hearing
By SCOTT TAYLOR, QMI Agency

OTTAWA – A police
disciplinary hearing heard dramatic testimony yesterday about Const. Jeff
Gulick’s violent conduct in May 2008.

Gulick pleaded guilty yesterday to
discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

He had previously
been found guilty of assaulting a police officer, uttering threats to cause
bodily harm, escaping lawful custody and mischief after officers tried to arrest
him at his home May 22, 2008.

In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick
became violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After
swearing at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived,
overturned furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a
picture frame and fought with his wife.

The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of Scotch.

But it was
when he was told he was being arrested later that evening that Gulick went
ballistic.

Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but overall calm situation
quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick fought back.

“He
started grabbing at my right side and I could feel my holster and gunbelt being
pulled.”

Gulick threatened to kill his fellow cops as he struggled with
what Const. Michael O’Reilly said was “superhuman” strength.

Gulick was
finally overcome after being shocked with a Taser by one of four officers who
had joined the fight.

Gulick was taken to the Ottawa Hospital’s Civic
Campus emergency room, but when they arrived Gulick had shed both wrist and
ankle cuffs and bolted across Carling Ave. to the Experimental Farm, where he
once again was shot with a Taser.

O’Reilly said the situation had “gone
as sideways as it can go.”

Earlier yesterday, a female police officer
testified she feels like an outcast among fellow officers as a result of her
involvement and subsequent testimony in Gulick’s disciplinary hearing.

Sgt. Holly Watson said she’s heard “through the rumour mill” that fellow
officers support Gulick and there “was never any support for the four of us who
were assaulted (by Gulick during the arrest).”

Watson added she has
received no support from the Police Association either. She also testified that
she still worries about where Gulick is when she goes to her car after work.

Police Chief Vern White is scheduled to testify today.

428 total views, 3 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother’s Baby Missing: Arizona

Paragraphs four through six read:  “”She should have
sought professional help. She did seek help for post partum
depression and she was on medication and during that
time she seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she
hopped in Bob Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old
mother, who allegedly told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

SSRI Stories note:  Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from any of these
medications can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over a period of
a year or more, under the supervision of a qualified and experienced specialist,
if available.
Withdrawal is sometimes more severe than the original
symptoms or problems.

http://www.kpho.com/news/22168065/detail.html

Johnson’s Grandfather Thinks She’s Lying

Bob Johnson Still Believes Baby Gabriel Is Alive

Pat McReynolds
Reporter,
KPHO.com

POSTED: 10:26 pm MST January 6, 2010
UPDATED: 6:43 am MST
January 7, 2010

TEMPE, Ariz. — Bob Johnson said his
granddaughter, Elizabeth, has always been secretive.

“If she didn’t want
you to know something, you ain’t gonna find out,” Johnson said.

He said
moving in and out of five foster homes as a child made her that way. But he said
the straight “A” student also developed an irrational temper that led to bouts
of rage.

“She should have sought professional help. She did seek help
for post partum depression and she was on medication and during that time she
seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she hopped in Bob
Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was
last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old mother, who allegedly
told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

Elizabeth Johnson was arrested last week in Florida on suspicion of
custodial interference after she didn’t show up for a custodial hearing.

“She had this cockamamie idea that she was going to change her Social
Security number and name and his Social Security number and name and run
forever,” Bob Johnson said.

Instead, in an exclusive interview with CBS
5, Elizabeth Johnson said she simply gave Gabriel to a couple she met in a park.

“I trusted them. I believe in my heart they’re good people,” said
Elizabeth Johnson on the phone from jail.

But her grandfather doesn’t
buy it. He tried to envision her scenario.

‘Oh by the way, how would you
like to have a baby, oh it’s free, yeah it’s free,’ Bob Johnson said. “That’s
hard. That’s hard to really believe, but it’s a simple story. It’s a story that
you can repeat without stumbling.”

The last time Bob Johnson saw Gabriel
was when the whole family got together for Thanksgiving. He has pictures of
Elizabeth Johnson posing with the boy’s father, Logan McQueary.

“She’s
the sweet Elizabeth,” Bob Johnson said when pointing to a picture of her
smiling.

He thinks she gave Gabriel to a family in Texas, and is lying
now so the boy will never be found. But she has threatened to harm the child,
and Bob Johnson wonders if her past and her struggles with self control
eventually got the best of her.

“It’s possible that in a moment of
anger, depression, whatever, that she carried out her threat. I don’t even want
to think about it because, what a waste. What a waste,” said Bob Johnson.

Copyright 2010 by KPHO.com. All rights
reserved.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Road Rage Driver Attacks School Bus Children

Paragraphs one through three read:  “Youngsters were
terrified when a roadrage driver smashed a school bus window with a
crook lock.”

“Glass shattered over the driver, while children were on
their way home from school.”

“Robert John Alan Campbell (30) had

earlier attacked two other vehicles, frightening the occupants, including
an elderly couple.”

Paragraphs 19 and 20 read:  “He said Campbell
was unable to cope while suffering from a personality disorder brought on by
stress and depression.”

“Campbell’s medication
stopped a few weeks before the road rage outburst,
but when he tried
to seek help he ran out of patience waiting in the doctor’s
surgery.”

SSRI Stories note: Withdrawal can
often be more dangerous than continuing on a medication.  Withdrawal must
be done slowly, over a period of a year or more, under the supervision of a
qualified specialist.

http://www.thisisleicestershire.co.uk/news/Roadrage-attacker-terrified-pupils-Leicester-jailed/article-1540590-detail/article.html

Roadrage attacker who terrified pupils in Leicester is
jailed

Wednesday, November 25, 2009,
09:30

Youngsters were terrified when a roadrage driver smashed a school
bus window with a crook lock.

Glass shattered over the driver, while

children were on their way home from school.

Robert John Alan Campbell
(30) had earlier attacked two other vehicles, frightening the occupants,
including an elderly couple.

Campbell, a married dad of three, was jailed
for 16 months after admitting three counts of causing damage and one of having
an offensive weapon – the crook lock.

Janet Hall, prosecuting, told
Leicester Crown Court that Campbell, who had run out of medication for a mental
health problem, committed the offences between 3pm and 4pm, on September
18.

The first happened when a pensioner in Groby Road, Leicester, braked
suddenly at red lights.

Ms Hall said: “The defendant was behind her and
very angry, gesticulating.

“To her horror, he got out of the car and
began throwing his arms around, shouting aggressively, causing her to lock her
door and feel very intimidated.”

Her husband, who suffered from ill
health, was also in the car.

Campbell kicked the driver‘s door, causing
£1,109 damage.

A short time later, Campbell lost his temper with a
motorist coming out of the Tesco car park in Beaumont Leys,
Leicester.

The driver, who was with his girlfriend, locked the doors when
the defendant got out of his vehicle and shouted “What’s your
problem?”

The defendant wielded what looked like a baseball bat, but was
a crook lock, which he used to strike the victim’s bonnet, causing £554 of
damage.

The school bus driver, travelling from Birstall towards
Glenfield, encountered the defendant when taking a wide turn, causing Campbell
to brake.

The defendant got out and, armed with his crook lock, smashed
the driver‘s window.

When the police went to Campbell’s home in Dominion

Road, Glenfield, he said: “The crook lock I used is in the front of my
car.”

The defendant also admitted damaging a TV set at Cash Generators,
in the city centre, on July 10, following an argument with staff.

Paul
Trotter, defending, said: “He’s not a man hell bent on criminality but a man
with problems and needs his medication properly managed.”

He said
Campbell was unable to cope while suffering from a personality disorder brought
on by stress and depression.

Campbell’s medication stopped a few weeks
before the road rage outburst, but when he tried to seek help he ran out of
patience waiting in the doctor’s surgery.

His health had since greatly
improved.

Judge Sylvia De Bertodano said the incidents had particularly
frightened the “vulnerable” elderly couple and the schoolchildren.

She
said: “If you smash windows of a bus with people on it, you take the risk that
someone inside will be injured.

“It’s no thanks to you that no-one was
hurt.

“I’ve seen a psychiatric report and have heard you’ve had
difficulties with your mental health, but the disorder you’ve been suffering
from doesn’t mean I’m not required to send you to prison.

“This sort of
behaviour was quite terrifying to members of the public going about their daily
business.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Antidepressant-Induced Violence in America

Paragraphs 23 through 25 read:  “Breggin studied medical
and other records of 50 cases of the newer antidepressants and violence, suicide
or disruptive behavior for his book, he said.”

In one case, a man
on an antidepressant wanted to die so badly that he ran into a police
officer with his car so he could knock him down, get his gun and try to shoot
himself.
Breggin said the police officer
didn’t press for a lengthy jail sentence because he thought the drug had
essentially driven the man crazy.”

“He said there is

no question that antidepressants can lead to
violence.”

Are claims just an excuse?

Poyner said she’s aware that critics will charge that antidepressant
claims merely offer criminals an excuse.

“I know that and I would have
said the same thing until I read this research,” Poyner said. “I worked
in prisons. I’ve treated inmates and so I tend to be very skeptical of somebody
trying to blame something on something else, especially a medication that is
prescribed by a doctor. But now I’m taking a second look at that thought and
saying, ‘Wait a minute.’”

http://newsok.com/oklahom-experts-look-at-antidepressants/article/3419386

Oklahoma experts look at antidepressants
Recent violence in Fort Hood,
Nichols Hills has some looking at links with medication

BY SONYA COLBERG
Published: November 22, 2009

As soon as news hit that the alleged Fort
Hood
, Texas,
shooter was a military psychiatrist, a disturbing thought struck Oklahoma
psychologist Gail Poyner.

  • Questions
    remain
    about risk to public
  • 11/22/2009 The debate over whether antidepressants play a role in suicides
    and homicides has taken twists and turns over the years. Drug company
    GlaxoSmithKline sent a…
“I wondered if….

“I think it would be interesting to know if
he had been taking an SSRI (antidepressant). It seems, based on news reports,
that he was very depressed. He may have taken an SSRI and that may have played a
part. Hopefully that will be investigated to determine,” said Poyner, a Ph.D.
with a practice in Choctaw.

Poyner was out of state and was shocked to
hear of the local allegations against Dr.
Stephen Paul Wolf
, jailed on murder and assault complaints in connection
with the recent stabbing death of his 9-year-old son, Tommy. The Nichols
Hills
doctor told the medical licensure board that he took antidepressants,
records show.

Wolf told the board he was hospitalized for depression and
under psychotherapy until his 1988 graduation from medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
.

He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized
again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,” Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. “I returned to work after my hospitalization on adjusted
dosages of antidepressants.”

It is unclear whether antidepressant usage
might have played any role in the Nov. 16 stabbing.

“Crimes that involve
this horrendous departure from one’s character and typical behavior may warrant
an investigation,” Poyner said. “Investigators may want to look into a possible
connection between his behavior and a recent introduction or increase in an

antidepressant.”

She added that every crime committed by someone taking
an antidepressant isn’t necessarily related to the antidepressant. A small
percentage of people have a genetic abnormality that can cause a violent
reaction to certain antidepressants, she said.

“We’re finding there are
cases of criminal behavior, especially violent and out-of-character criminal
behavior, that may be linked to these antidepressants,” Poyner said.

If
there’s blood on someone’s hands, investigate whether antidepressants were in

their systems, some experts say. The drugs are considered particularly dangerous
when certain patients are just beginning antidepressants, increasing the dosage
or getting off antidepressants, Poyner said.

But other experts say
there’s no clear evidence that antidepressants and violence go hand-in-hand.

Fort Hood raises questions
Dr.
Peter Breggin
, a medical doctor, former Johns
Hopkins University
faculty associate and author of “Medication Madness: The
Role of Psychiatric Drugs in Violence, Suicide and Murder,” said he immediately
wondered if Maj.
Nidal Hasan
was self-medicating.

“I think it was very likely,”
Breggin said.

Hasan was charged recently with 13 premeditated murder
counts stemming from the shootings. Investigators have made allegations about
Hasan exchanging e-mail with a radical imam, connecting with al-Qaida

members, lionizing suicide bombings and yelling “Allahu Akbar!” as the shootings
began. But Breggin said something more subtle might have been missed.

“It’s very possible that if he was … self-medicating, it could have
been Xanax.
I would say not that the drug did it but it might have pushed him over. But we
don’t know,” Breggin said.

He said that, as a psychiatrist, Hasan could
have easily taken antidepressant samples, and he could write his own
prescriptions for antidepressants. The FBI
removed possible evidence from Hasan’s apartment and then allowed media into the
dingy rooms. Among the things reported left behind were bottles of medications,
including some that he prescribed to himself.

Some call studies
inconclusive
For some people, Breggin said, newer antidepressants are “a
virtual prescription for violence.”

Dr.
Jayson Hymes
, though, said the studies are somewhat inconclusive. Some
research suggests the newer family of antidepressants, SSRIs (selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitors), might have a role in causing violence. But
British studies show they decrease the likelihood, he noted.

“Walking
past a bottle of antidepressants is not going to do anything,” Hymes said. “It
sounds to me, in this situation, that a lot of things just got missed by a lot
of people.”

He said the drugs under question are those antidepressants

that have become popular in the past 10 or 15 years: drugs such as Zoloft
and Celexa.
Probably the most violent behavior is a desire in some people to commit suicide,
he said.

A personal theory Hymes has developed indicates that along with
the suicidal thoughts come fatigue and the inability to make a decision and act
on it. The SSRIs work fast so the person’s energy level increases more quickly
than the mood elevation, he said. So the patient, particularly children and
young people, may still feel depressed and suicidal but suddenly has the energy
to act out.

Researcher claims violence tie
Breggin studied medical
and other records of 50 cases of the newer antidepressants and violence, suicide
or disruptive behavior for his book, he said.

In one case, a man on an

antidepressant wanted to die so badly that he ran into a police officer with his
car so he could knock him down, get his gun and try to shoot himself. Breggin
said the police officer didn’t press for a lengthy jail sentence because he
thought the drug had essentially driven the man crazy.

He said there is
no question that antidepressants can lead to violence.

But Hymes said
controversy over antidepressants can lead to frightening people away from drugs
that they may need.

“People can … moan about antidepressants all day
until they look at a loved one lying on the couch, only able to get up and go to
the bathroom and that’s it. In which case, it’s like, ‘Where’s that

antidepressant?’” Hymes said.

Oklahoma’s Poyner recently testified as an
expert witness in a murder case in which the defendant had been on
antidepressants. In the weeks leading up to the trial she examined studies and
stories on the correlation of antidepressants and violence. That research opened
her eyes to the possibilities of some famous cases such as housewife Andrea
Yates
’ drowning of her five children in 2001. But she remains shocked about
the horrible nature of such crimes, she said.

Are claims just an
excuse?

Poyner said she’s aware that critics will charge that antidepressant
claims merely offer criminals an excuse.

“I know that and I would have
said the same thing until I read this research,” Poyner said. “I worked in
prisons. I’ve treated inmates and so I tend to be very skeptical of somebody
trying to blame something on something else, especially a medication that is
prescribed by a doctor. But now I’m taking a second look at that thought and
saying, ‘Wait a minute.’”

Read more: http://newsok.com/oklahom-experts-look-at-antidepressants/article/3419386#ixzz0Xb21LiSq

439 total views, 1 views today

Luvox (SSRI)

Luvox (SSRI)
amy Bond
Was prescribed Luvox to treat my OCD prior to during and after birth of my 2nd child Having OCD i I was obsessed that this drug may harm the baby. I was reassured that it is a safe drug Our son was born with double outlet right ventricle, craniosynostosis and otosclerosis. Genetic testing was performed,but came back with no missing chromosomes or abnormalities,FISH etc we found out recently that this class C drug may have caused these defects in our child. A class C drug is a drug that no testing was performed on a pregnant woman but has been known to cause defects and morbidity in animals Why would a doctor prescribe a drug to a pregnant woman why would the FDA approve such a drug why would a company Solvay pharm make such a harmful product.. Our son has had 4 open heart surgeries, he’s deaf in 1 ear and he has a mis shaped skull and ear. My OCD was not severe enough to out weigh these possible defects. Any pregnant women DO NOT TAKE ANY SSRI good luck finding an attorney to rep you it’s been 3 years and no one will takr this case to court!!!!!!

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Alcohol Cravings & Assault Lead to Fatal Heart Attack: TN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________________
Paragraphs five and six read:  “The official cause of
death for Oteri was listed as a heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist
inflicted by Fagan, and the publisher’s family members maintained
they did not want Fagan to be prosecuted.

Fagan, who
was high on antidepressants and tequila the night of the fight,

was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation
treatment center

.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.upi.com/Entertainment_News/Music/2009/10/25/Songwriter-Fagan-remembers-lost-friend/UPI-64901256488994/

Songwriter Fagan remembers lost friend

Published: Oct. 25, 2009 at 12:43 PM
Order
reprints

NASHVILLE, Oct. 25 (UPI) — U.S. country songwriter Rich
Fagan says he wants his life to honor his publisher-friend Tom Oteri who died of
a heart attack after Fagan cut him
with a knife.

The (Nashville) Tennessean reported Sunday while Fagan did
not face prosecution for Oteri’s death on April 26, 2008, the songwriter holds
himself responsible.

“Part of me died that night, too, but it wasn’t the
good part,” Fagan told The Tennessean during an interview in Nashville. “If I’m
here for a reason, it’s to carry on Tom’s legacy.”

Fagan has written a
string of top hits recorded by country music stars, including “Americana,”
“Sold (The Grundy County Auction Incident),” “Be My Baby Tonight” and “I Miss
You a Little.”

The official cause of death for Oteri was listed as a

heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist inflicted by Fagan, and the
publisher’s family members maintained they did not want Fagan to be
prosecuted.

Fagan, who was high on antidepressants and tequila the night
of the fight, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation treatment center.

“The last
drink I had was that evening,” Fagan told The Tennessean. “I haven’t had one
since, and haven’t had the obsession to have
one.”

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