ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Infant Sexual Abuse Case : Female Child Care Director: WI

Paragraph 27 reads:  “The defense witnesses Thursday
included a psychologist who evaluated Benz and agreed with her prior diagnoses
of being manic-depressive and bi-polar and suffering from depression and
anxiety. Dr. Gene Braaksma said Benz was taking anti-depressants
and mood stabilizers in June 2007.”

http://www.sheboyganpress.com/article/20091204/SHE0101/912040448/1062/SHE01/Judge-to-rule-today-on-mistrial-motion-in-Mary-Benz-infantabusecase

Judge to rule today on mistrial motion in Mary Benz infant abuse
case

By Eric Litke • Sheboygan Press
staff • December 4, 2009

The defense is seeking a mistrial in the Mary
Benz infant abuse case after Benz’s attorney stumbled upon evidence he said was
valuable to his client’s case and not previously disclosed by the
prosecution.

Defense attorney Richard Hahn made the motion Thursday after
spotting a social worker’s case file while he was in District Attorney Joe
DeCecco’s office editing an audio recording earlier in the day. In a notation
made June 28, 2007 ­ two days after a 10-month-old girl was found to have
significant vaginal injuries ­ the doctor who examined her said the parents
could not be ruled out as suspects and the injuries could have occurred earlier
than he said when he testified.

The note was made before the
pediatrician, Dr. Thomas Valvano, interviewed the parents and differs from his
final findings, but Hahn said he should have been made aware of the report so he
could question Valvano about the statements. Valvano testified Wednesday and has
since returned to Oregon, where he now lives.

“All of this from an
investigative standpoint is a complete and absolute surprise,” said Hahn, adding
that he said he should have received the file during discovery. “That raises
three issues that I would have utilized with great prominence in my cross
examination of Dr. Valvano.”

Judge Terence Bourke will rule on the motion
for the mistrial this morning.

This was the fourth straight day Hahn
sought to have the case thrown out before it reached the jury, but the first
time DeCecco asked for time to prepare a response before Bourke
ruled.

Court records show Hahn filed his demand for discovery in June
2008. Discovery is when attorneys for both sides must share the evidence they
have gathered.

Hahn said he spotted the file sitting in a box on
DeCecco’s floor while the two editing an audio recording of an interview with
Benz that was played for the jury Thursday. That editing delayed the start of
the trial from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

The file in question was created by
the Sheboygan County Division of Social Services, which conducted an
investigation in cooperation with but separate from the Sheboygan County
Sheriff’s Department after the girl’s injury was discovered. The injury, an
inch-long vaginal tear, was discovered the same day the child was cared for at
Our Lady of the Lakes Child Care Center in Random Lake, where Benz was

director.
(2 of 3)

Benz, 51, is charged with felony child abuse and
three counts of misdemeanor resisting or obstructing an officer. Her trial began
Monday after 2½ years of delays from a 10-month investigation, numerous pretrial
motions and two adjourned trial dates.

The case file has not yet been
mentioned in the presence of the jury, as Hahn presented his motion after the
jury was sent home for the day Thursday. After the motion, social worker Laura
Lemon was called to testify as an unscheduled witness about the contents of the
case file.

Lemon said such files are typically given to the District
Attorney’s Office upon request, but she did not know if it was requested in this

case or when. The file includes a record of people contacted during Lemon’s
investigation, a final report and documentation gathered throughout the
investigation.

The case was closed Aug. 14, 2007, because no perpetrator
had been identified, Lemon said.

The key section cited by Hahn was a note
from a Social Services employee who fielded the call from Valvano and reported
that he wanted the agency to know the parents could not yet be ruled out and the
incident could have happened June 25. Valvano said at that point the day care
appeared the “most suspicious” in terms of where the injury likely
happened.

Valvano testified Wednesday that the injuries occurred 12 to 24
hours prior to his examining the child at 2 a.m. June 28.

Another case

note said Valvano told Social Services in a June 28 meeting at Children’s
Hospital in Milwaukee that the girl’s injury could have been caused by a finger,
and there is no indication a sharp object was used or what exactly caused the
injury.

Benz in third interview: ‘I don’t recall’

The
shortened day of testimony preceding Hahn’s motion included a third recorded
interview with Benz in which she changed key details from prior interviews and
repeatedly said “I don’t recall” when confronted about
inconsistencies.

The interview was conducted by Detective Mark Mancl of
the Sheboygan County Sheriff’s Department on July 26, 2007, after serving a
search warrant at Benz’s home.
(3 of 3)

Mancl focused several of his
questions on Benz’s alleged actions after a June 29, 2007, interview. After Benz
told Mancl then that she changed only two of the girl’s diapers on the day in
question, two day care employees testified that she called and asked them to say
they changed two other diapers when they hadn’t.

In the recording played
Thursday, Benz said she didn’t recall discussing the case with anyone other than
Ed Ritger, an attorney affiliated with the day care, didn’t recall telling one
girl she had been framed ­ as the girl testified she did ­ and didn’t
recall leaving a voicemail saying she messed up and needed help. That voicemail
was played in court Tuesday.

Benz did, however, say for the first time
that she changed all of the victim’s diapers on the day in question. She would
not say why she said otherwise in the two prior interviews, June 27 and
29.

Benz also wouldn’t say why she claimed June 29 that a volunteer had
been caring for the infants during the victim’s first 90 minutes at the day care

when on June 27 she didn’t list that worker as one of the people present. Benz
then said she didn’t recall if the woman was there or had worked with the
infants.

The woman, Rita Schmid, has testified she arrived at 6:30 a.m.
­ around the time the victim did ­ but left when Benz said she wasn’t
needed. She also said Benz called her after the June 29 interview and asked her
to say she worked until 8 a.m. and saw the victim in good spirits.

Asked
directly, Benz repeated previous denials in saying she has no knowledge of the
girl’s injuries and didn’t cause them.

“There was nothing wrong. I had no
concerns when (the victim) left at 4 o’clock,” Benz says in the interview before
deflecting responsibility. “This is the first time dad picks (her) up, and now
we have a problem.”

More defense witnesses testify

The five-hour delay
further disrupted scheduling for the trial, which was to end today. The
prosecution still has not formally rested its case, as Mancl has been on and off
the stand three times to allow witnesses for the defense to testify as
originally scheduled.

The defense witnesses Thursday included a
psychologist who evaluated Benz and agreed with her prior diagnoses of being
manic-depressive and bi-polar and suffering from depression and anxiety. Dr.
Gene Braaksma said Benz was taking anti-depressants and mood stabilizers in June
2007.

Braaksma, who spent about seven hours testing Benz and looking
through her mental health history, said she is “limited in her capability” to
deal with stress. In response to a question by DeCecco referencing Benz
allegedly asking the workers to lie and forging a document, Braaksma said he
would expect a person with Benz’s diagnoses to “crumble” rather than take
logical action to cover a crime.

Benz, 51, is charged with felony
child abuse and three counts of misdemeanor resisting or obstructing an officer.
Her trial began Monday after 2½ years of delays from a 10-month investigation,
numerous pretrial motions and two adjourned trial dates.

The case file
has not yet been mentioned in the presence of the jury, as Hahn presented his
motion after the jury was sent home for the day Thursday. After the motion,
social worker Laura Lemon was called to testify as an unscheduled witness about
the contents of the case file.

Lemon said such files are typically given
to the District Attorney’s Office upon request, but she did not know if it was
requested in this case or when. The file includes a record of people contacted
during Lemon’s investigation, a final report and documentation gathered
throughout the investigation.

The case was closed Aug. 14, 2007, because
no perpetrator had been identified, Lemon said.

The key section cited by
Hahn was a note from a Social Services employee who fielded the call from
Valvano and reported that he wanted the agency to know the parents could not yet
be ruled out and the incident could have happened June 25. Valvano said at that
point the day care appeared the “most suspicious” in terms of where the injury
likely happened.

Valvano testified Wednesday that the injuries occurred
12 to 24 hours prior to his examining the child at 2 a.m. June
28.

Another case note said Valvano told Social Services in a June 28
meeting at Children’s Hospital in Milwaukee that the girl’s injury could have
been caused by a finger, and there is no indication a sharp object was used or
what exactly caused the injury.

Benz in third interview: ‘I don’t recall’

The
shortened day of testimony preceding Hahn’s motion included a third recorded
interview with Benz in which she changed key details from prior interviews and
repeatedly said “I don’t recall” when confronted about
inconsistencies.

The interview was conducted by Detective Mark Mancl of
the Sheboygan County Sheriff’s Department on July 26, 2007, after serving a
search

Reach Eric Litke at (920) 453-5119 and

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sleeping Pills: Death: 32 Year Old Woman Dies from a …

Paragraph two reads:  “Bolton Coroner’s Court heard that
Samantha Andrews, aged 32, of Harpford Close, Breightmet, died after taking drugs including
sleeping tablets, anti-depressants and
anti-hystamines.”

http://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/4776972.Depressed_woman_died_from_cocktail_of_drugs/

Depressed woman died from cocktail of drugs

11:00am
Friday 4th December 2009

A woman who was suffering from depression died
after taking a cocktail of prescription drugs, an inquest heard.

Bolton
Coroner’s Court heard that Samantha Andrews, aged 32, of Harpford Close, Breightmet,
died after taking drugs including sleeping tablets, anti-depressants and
anti-hystamines.

But Assistant Deputy Coroner Peter Watson said there
was insufficient evidence to prove that Miss Andrews committed suicide and
recorded an open verdict.

The inquest heard that Miss Andrews, who had
trained as a nurse, had previously twice taken overdoses but told doctors that
these were a cry for help.

She was found unconscious in her bed by her
partner, Philip Brockbank, on March 2 and taken for treatment at the Royal
Bolton Hospital, before being transferred to a hospital in Wigan where she died
on March 5.

The cause of death was brain death due to lack of oxygen,
caused by the overdose.

Mr Watson said: “She was still a young woman who
clearly had talent but had troubles in her life.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Young Man Collapses, Almost Dies: England

Paragraphs 11 and 12 read:  “The court heard the lad, who
is
suffering from depression, had not had his
medication for four days and tried to ‘catch up’ by taking four days
worth in one go.”

“Mr Parsons added:  ‘One of the side
effects was that this young man collapsed on Mr Lane’s floor. He was
unconscious. There was a delay in the ambulance coming to the flat. Mr Lane was
very distressed. He thought this young man who was in his
care was dead’.”

http://www.thisissouthdevon.co.uk/news/Death-threat-paramedic-trying-save-teenager/article-1513118-detail/article.html

Death threat to paramedic trying to save teenager

Friday, November 13, 2009, 09:22

A MAN threatened to kill a
paramedic who was trying to save the life of a teenager after he collapsed at
his house with a heart attack, a court heard.

South Devon magistrates in
Torquay were told Robert Lane became agitated and angry with ambulance staff who
were trying to revive the 19-year-old man.

Following the case, a
spokesman for the ambulance service said: “Any abuse, whether verbal or
physical, will not be tolerated. The trust takes incidents of this nature very
seriously.”

The court heard on Saturday, October 24, the young man, who
had been living with Lane at his Prospect Lane home in Brixham for the past two
years, collapsed with suspected heart failure after ingesting four days’ worth
of anti-depressants in one go.

Lane, 48, called 999 but was angry with
the paramedics when he claimed they turned up 35 minutes later.

Lyndsey
Baker, prosecuting, said: “When ambulance staff arrived, the suspect became
abusive. He grabbed one of the staff and tried to throw a punch at him. Another
paramedic tried to intervene and he again tried to throw a punch at
him.”

In a statement, paramedic Martin Stone said: “I felt the male was
going to assault me and was in fear of violence. It was completely unprovoked
while we were treating someone for a serious condition.”

In his
statement, Mr Stone said: “He (Lane) said to me, ‘If anything happens to him
you’re dead’. I was in fear for my safety and that of my colleagues.”

The
court heard on the day Lane had drunk two pints of lager, was in an agitated
state and was angry at the situation. Lane yesterday pleaded guilty to a charge
of obstructing or hindering an emergency worker.

Lane’s solicitor, Alan
Parsons, said his client had been providing accommodation to the 19-year-old, a
friend of his own 19-year-old son, for two and a half years after he fell out
with his family. Mr Parsons said: “He treated him like a second son.”

The
court heard the lad, who is suffering from depression, had not had his
medication for four days and tried to ‘catch up’ by taking four days worth in
one go.

Mr Parsons added: “One of the side effects was that this young

man collapsed on Mr Lane’s floor. He was unconscious. There was a delay in the
ambulance coming to the flat. Mr Lane was very distressed. He thought this young
man who was in his care was dead.”

Mr Parsons said the 19-year-old man
was successfully resuscitated by paramedics.

He added: “Mr Lane panicked.
He asked the paramedics why the ambulance took so long.

“He accepts he
obstructed their activity but the last thing he wanted was to hinder anything
which could stop them from saving this 19-year-old’s life. It was a regrettable
situation, but the young man has now made a full recovery.”

Sentencing
Lane to an 18-month conditional discharge, £100 compensation and an £85 fine,
Torbay magistrates said: “We understand the stress you were under on the day,
but public sector workers, especially paramedics deserve support not threats.
This was a very serious offence.”

The ambulance service spokesman said
paramedics arrived on the scene within four minutes.

She said: “Every
ambulance clinician should be able to fulfil their life-saving role without fear
of abuse or assault. As this case demonstrates there will be consequences for
people who believe it is acceptable to disrespect ambulance
personnel.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide: Woman Leaps From 9th Floor: England

Paragraph three reads:  “St Pancras Coroner’s Court was
told last Thursday how she had been suffering from depression
triggered by changes to her job, which included hotdesking – moving from
one seat to another a number of times – and the responsibility of caring for her
mother following an illness in 2005.”

Paragraph seven reads:  “Mr
Jolliffe focused his questions on whether Ms Calvey should have been
monitored more closely when taking her medication

and whether a lack of continuity of nurses
aggravated the situation.”

http://www.thecnj.co.uk/camden/2009/102209/news102209_09.html

Hotdesking’ led to council worker’s suicide leap

A COUNCIL employee who worked for the Town Hall for nearly 30 years
became depressed after she was asked to “hotdesk” and later killed herself, an
inquest heard.
Geraldine Calvey, 45, died after throwing herself from the
ninth floor of a tower block in the Regent’s Park estate off Euston Road in
July.
St Pancras Coroner’s Court was told last Thursday how she had been
suffering from depression triggered by changes to her job, which included
hotdesking – moving from one seat to another a number of times – and the
responsibility of caring for her mother following an illness in 2005. The death
of Ms Calvey’s father had also added to her anxiety but she felt she was too
busy to grieve.
The inquest heard how she attempted an overdose but
survived. Ms Calvey was released from hospital within four days and referred to
the South Camden Crisis Response and Resolution team, run by the Camden and
Islington NHS FoundationTrust on behalf of the council.
Psychiatrist Leticia
Magana-niebla, the Crisis team leader, said Ms Calvey appeared to be improving
before her death.
She said: “The latest stress was this change on her job and
having to hotdesk, and that was particularly bad for her, for the reasons of her
personality – liking things just so and being methodical.”
Ms Calvey’s
family, who were represented at the hearing by barrister John Jolliffe, believe
she was not properly cared for and have lodged a complaint.
Mr Jolliffe
focused his questions on whether Ms Calvey should have been monitored more
closely when taking her medication and whether a lack of continuity of nurses
aggravated the situation.
“She was seen by no fewer than six nurses from the
Camden team and she had to explain herself again as if starting from scratch and
couldn’t build up a rapport with them,” he said.
Recording a verdict of

suicide, Dr Reid said Ms Calvey impulsively took her own life. He cleared the
Crisis team of any failings, adding: “At no time was there any evidence upon
which the team could be satisfied she was suffering mental illness that would
warrant sectioning, and she declined informal admission.”
A statement from
Camden Council read: “Geraldine was a dedicated, conscientious and popular
member of staff who had worked for the council for 29 years. She is greatly
missed by everyone who worked with her.”
[]

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DEPRESSION MED: Amnesia: Woman Can’t Remember Taking Money: Canada

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.”

SSRI Stories note:  Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side-effect of SSRI antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference.

http://bugleobserver.canadaeast.com/news/article/770522

Woman shows up for trial with ‘lost’ cash

Published Tuesday August 25th, 2009

Nackawic woman found not guilty of stealing community fundraising, but judge finds her story ‘fishy’

A provincial court judge said he could not convict a Nackawic woman of theft, despite finding her testimony unbelievable.

Judge John J. Walsh announced his decision in a Woodstock courtroom Friday morning, finding Julie Boone, 34, not guilty of the crime of theft under $5,000.

“Her explanations were not logical, nor were they rational,” the judge said as he read his decision.

Boone’s trial began in May, as former members of the Nackawic Community Days committee took the stand, testifying about the disappearance of approximately $800 raised at a dance in 2007, a dance held to raise money for Nackawic Community Days, a dance where Boone worked the door and was supposed to deposit the funds raised into an account for the committee.

But somewhere along the way, the money was lost, or, as the Crown alleged, stolen by Boone.

On the first day of the trial back in May, another former committee member, Julie Brown, testified the dance had been Boone’s idea.

Brown said when the committee met following the dance, in June 2007, Boone told the committee she’d dropped the money in the night deposit box at the Scotiabank branch in Nackawic, a total of about $800.

But according to Brown, a bank statement didn’t show the deposit.

Later on, it was learned an envelope containing receipts had been dropped in the night deposit slot at the CIBC branch in Nackawic, which is situated in the same mall as the Scotiabank.

Brown told the court Boone was evasive as the committee tried to track the money down.

“Every time I talked to her there was a new excuse,” Brown said.

Brown said the money was never found or recovered.

The trial was adjourned to Aug. 19, at which time, Boone took the stand in her own defence.

According to Boone, she had worked the door at the Saturday dance by herself, although she said there were supposed to be two other volunteers, but they didn’t show up.

Following the dance, Boone said she’d placed the money in an envelope, which she would deposit the following Monday.

Boone said she’d placed the envelope under the front seat of her car for safekeeping.

The day after the dance, a Sunday, Boone said she decided she’d deposit the money. She said she’d been told by a neighbour about a series of break-ins to vehicles in the area, and decided the money should go to the bank sooner rather than later.

“In my haste, I put it in the wrong bank,” Boone said, offering an explanation as to why an envelope containing receipts and not the money from the dance ended up at the CIBC.

Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.

Boone said she thought she may have sent the money out west by accident. She said she had sent some photos of one of her children to the father of the child, but thought she may have sent the money. She said after communication with the father, she determined the money had not gone west.

So from June 2007 to January 2009, the money remained missing.

But Boone made a startling revelation during her testimony.

It seems the vehicle she’d been driving at the time of the dance had been passed to her sister, then to her father, and in January 2009, was at her parents’ home.

Boone said she had been trying to retrace her steps, contacting anyone she may have dealt with in June 2007 as she continued to try and locate the money.

Boone said she had gone to the vehicle and thoroughly searched it. She said under the trunk of the car, where the spare tire is kept, she located a file folder. According to Boone, the folder contained papers relating to her work on the Community Days committee. She said there was also an envelope containing a significant sum of money, which she said she realized was the money from the dance.

Boone said she had no explanation for how the envelope ended up in the trunk of her car.

“I wish I did,” she said.

Boone produced the envelope in court, to the surprise of Crown prosecutor Christopher Lavigne.

Lavigne told Judge Walsh he’d never seen the envelope before, and wouldn’t be able to consent to entering the envelope into evidence without an opportunity to examine the contents.

Upon examining the contents, Lavigne found the envelope contained $780.50. Of that total, $20.50 was what remained of a float Boone had the night of the dance. The rest was from ticket sales.

During cross-examination, Lavigne said he found it unusual that every bill in the envelope was dated 2004. Boone said she’d never taken the money out of the envelope after she found it, and had never looked at the dates on the bills.

In making final arguments, Boone’s lawyer, Brent Dickinson, said his client’s story was consistent throughout her testimony, despite the Crown’s attempts to poke holes in it.

While the judge agreed the story was consistent, he still found it troubling. “Her story is, quite frankly, fishy,” Judge Walsh said. “It raises a lot of alarm bells.”

But when giving his decision, Judge Walsh said he had reasonable doubt about Boone’s guilt.

“Can I reject her evidence outright?” the judge asked. “I find I can’t.”

Based on the reasonable doubt, Boone was found not guilty. Both Lavigne and Dickinson agreed the money should be returned to the Nackawic Community Days committee.

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