Media With Mental Health to Work Together for Suicide Prevention???

 

suicide stats

Public health burden of suicidal behavior among adults

aged =18 years — United States, 2008

The Deseret News in Salt Lake City just ran an article titled, “Media, mental health professionals discuss working together on suicide prevention?” Really? And how many are going to fall for that? The link to this original article is below and here is my comment on that article:

“Without question suicide is a huge problem plaguing our society. But in searching the cause few see the obvious as the cause, even when admitted, due to the huge amount of revenue associated with it. That is the drugs prescribed to those who are depressed – antidepressants which carry warnings of suicidal ideation. A decade ago antidepressants were given an FDA Black Box Warning (the next step from a complete ban).

“Now we should feel better knowing that media, who receive massive amounts of advertising dollars to promote these drugs, and groups like NAMI, who was shown by a Senate Probe led by Senator Charles Grassley to be 75% funded by Pharma, are looking for answers? Also just days ago JAMA published a study showing 40% of teaching hospitals, like UNI, have drug company ties.

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1853147

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/22919-leaders-of-teaching-hospitals-have-close-ties-to-drug-companies-study-shows

“Propublica in their Dollars for Docs program is working to stop these vested interests. Until it is no longer financially advantageous to those searching I would not expect real answers to suicide prevention. The answer will continue to be “Take your drugs and don’t worry about the suicidal ideation warning. It will not affect you, only others.”

I should have finished with this line, “It will not affect you, only others, because as soon as you go manic on your antidepressant you will become invincable.”

Original Article: http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865600455/Media-mental-health-professionals-discuss-working-together-on-suicide-prevention.html

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/  And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. These reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid!

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Speaker of the House in Georgia Legislature Attempts Suicide

Paragraph 7 reads:  “Sure, he had been under a doctor’s
care, taking medication, but apparently  ‘the black
dog,’ as Winston Churchill once called depression, started
howling so fiercely last Sunday that one of Georgia’s top legislators couldn’t
silence it. Those who suffer from depression are the first to know it is
hardly a simple disease.”

http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_163177.asp

Roy Exum: A Suicide Is Foiled
by Roy Exum
posted November 15,
2009

Roy Exum
Glenn Richardson is the Speaker of

the House in the Georgia legislature. He has been elected to represent those in
the Dallas/Hiram part of the state seven straight times and, when he became

Speaker in 2003, he was the first Republican chosen since Reconstruction.
Earlier this year, he was unanimously chosen as the legislature’s leader for the
third straight time.

In short, he doesn’t fail at many things, but a week
ago he tried to commit suicide. Because of quick action by emergency teams in

Paulding County, his life was spared and, in a moving story that appeared in
Saturday’s Atlanta newspaper, he courageously admitted he fights severe
depression and will use the near-tragedy to better suicide prevention.

His was hardly a publicity stunt or a novel way of attracting
voters. He doesn’t need that. But the anguish in his coming forward, readily
admitting his human flaw, shows that if depression can lay its thick and
suffocating blanket on state legislator Glenn Richardson, it can be a very black
cloud over any of us.

“While depression often seems to be resolved on
occasion, when personal trials or tribulations arise, it flares back up,”
Richardson said in his public statement. “That is what occurred with me. My
depression became so severe that I took substantial steps to do harm to myself
and to take my own life. I am thankful that because of medical intervention I
have instead been able to now receive help and support.”

A couple of

years ago Richardson and his wife were divorced in a high-profile case of a
marriage that was “irretrievably broken.” The couple has three children and
apparently Glenn has never shaken the pain of the divorce. Anyone who has ever
gone through a divorce can understand that, most especially if grief-stricken
children are watching.

“I ask that the media use discernment if they
report this and remember my friends and family who are also hurting,” his
statement read. “I fully believe this has and will continue to push me to find
my best self and use my position of leadership to raise awareness and let others
know they are not alone. Thank you for your thoughts and prayers.”

Sure,
he had been under a doctor’s care, taking medication, but apparently “the black
dog,” as Winston Churchill once called depression, started howling so fiercely
last Sunday that one of Georgia’s top legislators couldn’t silence it. Those who
suffer from depression are the first to know it is hardly a simple
disease.

So instead of giving in to the problem and giving up his
standing in the Georgia House after Sunday night’s scare, Glenn is now going
“public,” urging others to “stay in the game” rather than commit what has been
called “life’s most selfish act” because suicide leaves so many living victims

in its wake.

Both Republicans and Democrats applauded his courage Friday.
Speaker Pro Tem Mark Burkhalter (R-Johns Creek), called Richardson a “brilliant
political leader and dear friend.”

“Most importantly, each of us is
praying for him and his family,” Burkhalter told newspaper reporters. “His
willingness to share this difficult experience clearly demonstrates his amazing
courage. Speaker Richardson is a true champion, and we in the House of

Representatives look forward to his continued leadership and
recovery.”

DuBose Porter (D-Dublin) is the House Minority leader and
added his “thoughts and prayers are with Glenn and his family. I am glad he
sought the help that he needed to. People need to know many people suffer from
depression and there is help that can be provided for that. I am thankful he got
the help he needed.”

So the lesson is not to point out how the strong
have fallen, but rather that those who suffer are not alone. There is help
available no matter where you are, who you are, or how insignificant the disease
might tend to make you feel you are.

The bottom line is that somebody
needs each of us. In the state of Georgia literally millions rely on Glen
Richardson’s wisdom and leadership. He’ll be the first to tell you today that no
matter how black the darkness may be, there is a way out of the maze of severe
depression if you’ll call on others to hold your hand until the professionals
who walk among us can cease its trembling.

Thank God that is what Glenn
Richardson did just last
Sunday.

royexum@aol.com

528 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Unexpected Suicide Attempt: Permanent Brain Damage: NY

Paragraph 3 reads:  “Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain
damage
and severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead
Park Nursing Home and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his
daughter said.”

Paragraph 14 reads:  “According to Ms. Schortemeyer,
her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic car
aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his
children, and would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on
monthly visits when they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However,
Mr. Schortemeyer suffered from loneliness and was on medication for

depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=232464&town=Sag%20Harbor&n=Sag%20Harbor%20woman%20advocates%20for%20suicide%20prevention%20awareness

Sag Harbor woman advocates for suicide prevention awareness

By Bryan Finlayson
Sep 7, 09 10:32 AM

Two years ago in June, Ann Marie Schortemeyer, 25, was
driving home from work when Karen Mayer, her aunt, phoned with
news.

After an attempted suicide, Edwin Schortemeyer, Ann Marie’s father,
a veteran union plumber from Manorville, was in critical condition at John T.
Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.

Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain damage and
severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead Park Nursing Home
and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his daughter
said.

Now, Ms. Schortemeyer, who lives in Sag Harbor, is on a quiet
mission to spread awareness about suicide prevention on Long Island. She and her
fund-raising group, Eddie’s Angels, which has five members, collect donations
for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention [AFSP], a nationwide
organization that advocates research into the causes of suicide. To date, they
have collected $2,208 for the foundation.

Ms. Schortemeyer is also
participating in a suicide awareness walk at the Old Westbury Gardens in Old
Westbury on October 4, about a month after September 10, which is World Suicide

Prevention Day.

“I don’t think people realize how big a problem
depression and mental illness can be,” Ms. Schortemeyer said last week. “It can
affect anyone. I thought my dad was a happy man, and it turns out he had his own
battle with depression.”

The suicide or attempted suicide of a loved one
touches the lives of thousands of Americans each year, AFSC Executive Director
Bob Gebbia said. More than 33,000 people in the United States commit suicide a
year and close to a million attempt suicide, he said.

“If you take the
suicides and the attempted suicides and put them together, you can see that this
is a serious problem,” Mr. Gebbia said.

The Old Westbury Gardens walk is
expected to raise $125,000 for the AFSP to help fund education and research
grants for suicide prevention, Mr. Gebbia said. The money goes toward research
grants for institutions such as Columbia University, and will help fund
investigations into brain chemistry, psychosocial behavior and other symptoms
that can lead to suicide.

The walk in Old Westbury Gardens is one of 190
walks that will occur throughout the country this fall to raise awareness about

suicide prevention. Mr. Gebbia said more than 50,000 people are expected to
participate overall.

One of the foundation’s goals is to break the social
stigma that keeps people from discussing suicide and mental illness with
others.

Suicide is something that is not talked about, it is kept in the
shadows,” said Mr. Gebbia, noting that symptoms relating to suicide can be
treated with medication and therapy. “Suicide is the result of illness, not the
result of character flaws or a personal weakness.”

In Ms. Schortemeyer’s
experience, her father attempted suicide without giving any clear forewarning to
his family and friends. Neither Ms. Schortemeyer or her sister, Sharon, 23, of
Lindenhurst saw any warning signs leading up to the tragedy, Ms. Schortemeyer
said. But in retrospect, Ms. Schortemeyer said, there were “1,000 warning signs”
that her father was battling depression, yet “me and my sister didn’t even
notice it. It just seemed like a funny phase.”

According to Ms.
Schortemeyer, her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic
car aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his children, and
would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on monthly visits when
they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However, Mr. Schortemeyer
suffered from loneliness and was on medication for depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

His second marriage­he married about two weeks before he
attempted suicide­was tumultuous, by Ms. Schortemeyer’s account. “He married
a woman he didn’t know too well,” Ms. Schortemeyer said.

In
conversations, Mr. Schortemeyer often complained of money problems and of his
daughters being so far away from home. In 2007, Sharon was attending college in
Florida and Ann Marie was working as an administrative assistant for a
construction company in Wisconsin.

“He just seemed to be complaining a
lot about credit card bills and the cost of maintaining a home,” Ms.
Schortemeyer said. “I thought it wasn’t anything that big.”

The night
before Mr. Schortemeyer hung himself, he called Ms. Schortemeyer in Wisconsin
and left a voice message to thank her for a Father’s Day card. “He said he
misses me and to please call him soon,” said Ms. Schortemeyer, who reached the
message the following day.

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DEPRESSION MED: Suicide Attempt: Unexpected: Permanent Brain Damage: Ne…

Paragraph 3 reads:  “Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain
damage
and severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead
Park Nursing Home and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his
daughter said.”

Paragraph 14 reads:  “According to Ms. Schortemeyer,
her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic car
aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his
children, and would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on
monthly visits when they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However,
Mr. Schortemeyer suffered from loneliness and was on medication for

depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=232464&town=Sag%20Harbor&n=Sag%20Harbor%20woman%20advocates%20for%20suicide%20prevention%20awareness

Sag Harbor woman advocates for suicide prevention awareness

By Bryan Finlayson
Sep 7, 09 10:32 AM

Two years ago in June, Ann Marie Schortemeyer, 25, was
driving home from work when Karen Mayer, her aunt, phoned with
news.

After an attempted suicide, Edwin Schortemeyer, Ann Marie’s father,
a veteran union plumber from Manorville, was in critical condition at John T.
Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.

Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain damage and
severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead Park Nursing Home
and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his daughter
said.

Now, Ms. Schortemeyer, who lives in Sag Harbor, is on a quiet
mission to spread awareness about suicide prevention on Long Island. She and her
fund-raising group, Eddie’s Angels, which has five members, collect donations
for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention [AFSP], a nationwide
organization that advocates research into the causes of suicide. To date, they
have collected $2,208 for the foundation.

Ms. Schortemeyer is also
participating in a suicide awareness walk at the Old Westbury Gardens in Old
Westbury on October 4, about a month after September 10, which is World Suicide

Prevention Day.

“I don’t think people realize how big a problem
depression and mental illness can be,” Ms. Schortemeyer said last week. “It can
affect anyone. I thought my dad was a happy man, and it turns out he had his own
battle with depression.”

The suicide or attempted suicide of a loved one
touches the lives of thousands of Americans each year, AFSC Executive Director
Bob Gebbia said. More than 33,000 people in the United States commit suicide a
year and close to a million attempt suicide, he said.

“If you take the
suicides and the attempted suicides and put them together, you can see that this
is a serious problem,” Mr. Gebbia said.

The Old Westbury Gardens walk is
expected to raise $125,000 for the AFSP to help fund education and research
grants for suicide prevention, Mr. Gebbia said. The money goes toward research
grants for institutions such as Columbia University, and will help fund
investigations into brain chemistry, psychosocial behavior and other symptoms
that can lead to suicide.

The walk in Old Westbury Gardens is one of 190
walks that will occur throughout the country this fall to raise awareness about

suicide prevention. Mr. Gebbia said more than 50,000 people are expected to
participate overall.

One of the foundation’s goals is to break the social
stigma that keeps people from discussing suicide and mental illness with
others.

Suicide is something that is not talked about, it is kept in the
shadows,” said Mr. Gebbia, noting that symptoms relating to suicide can be
treated with medication and therapy. “Suicide is the result of illness, not the
result of character flaws or a personal weakness.”

In Ms. Schortemeyer’s
experience, her father attempted suicide without giving any clear forewarning to
his family and friends. Neither Ms. Schortemeyer or her sister, Sharon, 23, of
Lindenhurst saw any warning signs leading up to the tragedy, Ms. Schortemeyer
said. But in retrospect, Ms. Schortemeyer said, there were “1,000 warning signs”
that her father was battling depression, yet “me and my sister didn’t even
notice it. It just seemed like a funny phase.”

According to Ms.
Schortemeyer, her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic
car aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his children, and
would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on monthly visits when
they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However, Mr. Schortemeyer
suffered from loneliness and was on medication for depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

His second marriage­he married about two weeks before he
attempted suicide­was tumultuous, by Ms. Schortemeyer’s account. “He married
a woman he didn’t know too well,” Ms. Schortemeyer said.

In
conversations, Mr. Schortemeyer often complained of money problems and of his
daughters being so far away from home. In 2007, Sharon was attending college in
Florida and Ann Marie was working as an administrative assistant for a
construction company in Wisconsin.

“He just seemed to be complaining a
lot about credit card bills and the cost of maintaining a home,” Ms.
Schortemeyer said. “I thought it wasn’t anything that big.”

The night
before Mr. Schortemeyer hung himself, he called Ms. Schortemeyer in Wisconsin
and left a voice message to thank her for a Father’s Day card. “He said he
misses me and to please call him soon,” said Ms. Schortemeyer, who reached the
message the following day.

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