MEDICATIONS: Yet Another So Called “Terrorist” on Meds!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Take away these serotonergic medications on both sides of this war and
there would be no war, and likely never would have been a war – except for those
determined to have one for profits only!
From the LA Times report just three months after 9/11 we learned
that the Taliban psychiatrist had posters of antidepressants all over his
office and he was reported as saying that what the Taliban needed was not more
guns, but more Prozac. Of course it follows that if they needed
more, he already had them on antidepressants. He then made this
chilling statement that clearly says anyone he saw would be prescribed
one of these drugs: “Allah has given these drugs great power. Taking them
is like swallowing a little piece of God.”
We now have so many of our US military on these drugs that for several
years now we have lost more soldiers to suicide than we have in combat.
Even those that make it back home are lucky to wake up in the mornings because
so many of them are dying in their sleep from the drug combos they are
being prescribed by the VA.
On top of all that we have those like this fellow being arrested as a
terrorist” because of his reactions to his medications‘ It reminds me of the
young man I attempted to help in Israel several years ago. He was so painfully
shy that his doctor gave him Paxil to treat his Social Anxiety Disorder. His
family read my book and were alarmed and very concerned, but the young man
“seemed to be doing okay” on the drug and they thought that if they just
watched him carefully he would be okay. So they watched carefully, they thought,
until he got up in the middle of the night, blew up an Army jeep, and began
ranting and raving about wanting to be a suicide bomber! (Keep in mind that he
went on this drug because he was shy!) Needless to say no one was more
embarrassed and shocked by his behavior than he was!
_________________________________________
Speaking out in her son’s defense, Nadia Alessa admitted he suffered from
severe anger management issues, but insisted he does not pose a threat to the
country where he was born to Palestinian immigrants.

“Anything makes him
angry,” Nadia Alessa, told CNN of her son. “But he’s not a terrorist; he’s a
stupid kid.”

In interviews with CNN and The New York Times, Alessa said her
son was so full of rage, he began seeing psychiatrists and taking medications to
control his moods at age 6. The boy known for screaming at his mother and
roughing up his father’s car changed schools no less than 10 times, the Times
reported.

Who Are the Alleged New Jersey Jihadists?

Updated: 1 hour 15 minutes ago

Michelle Ruiz

Michelle Ruiz Contributor

AOL
News

(June 13) — The two New
Jersey men arrested at New York’s John F.
Kennedy Airport and charged with conspiring to kill U.S. troops overseas were
troubled, rebellious teens, according to reports. The pair’s brushes with the
law and extreme anti-American sentiments eventually sparked an elaborate
take-down by the FBI.

Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, 20, of North Bergen, N.J.,
and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, 24, of Elmwood Park, N.J., were reportedly nabbed
with help from an undercover rookie New York policeman of Egyptian descent, The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.,
reported
. Alessa’s mother, Nadia Alessa, told CNN she thought the man Alessa
and Almonte called “Bassim” recorded provocative remarks the pair made and built
a case against them.

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Marshals on Wednesday June 9, 2010 shows Mohamed Mahmoud Alessa (left) and Carlos Eduardo Almonte (right).

U.S. Marshals/AP
Family and friends of the alleged New Jersey jihadists,
Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, left, and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, say the pair were
rebellious teens. Alessa and Almonte were arrested June 5 at New York’s JFK
airport, where they planned to fly separately to Somalia by way of Egypt to join
a terrorist organization, the FBI said.

In November 2009, the
officer’s wire captured potentially damning conversations between Alessa and
Almonte.

“A lot of people need to get killed, bro. Swear to God. I have
to get an assault rifle and just kill anyone that even looks at me the wrong
way, bro,” Alessa said, according to transcripts included in the criminal
complaint. “My soul cannot rest until I shed blood. I wanna, like, be the
world’s known terrorist. I swear to God.”

Speaking out in her son’s
defense, Nadia Alessa admitted he suffered from severe anger management issues,
but insisted he does not pose a threat to the country where he was born to
Palestinian immigrants.

“Anything makes him angry,” Nadia Alessa, told
CNN of her son. “But he’s not a terrorist; he’s a stupid kid.”

In
interviews with CNN and The New York Times, Alessa said her
son was so full of rage, he began seeing psychiatrists and taking medications to
control his moods at age 6. The boy known for screaming at his mother and
roughing up his father’s car changed schools no less than 10 times, the Times
reported.
Alessa alarmed students and
staffers at two public high schools — North Bergen and KAS Prep in 2005 and
2006, after threatening to “blow up the school, mutilate gays and punish women
who were not subordinate to men,” school officials told the Times.

The
Department of Homeland Security was alerted and North Bergen relegated Alessa to
a public library to receive his lessons under the watchful eye of a security
guard, a school spokesman said, because “administrators felt that his presence
in school posed a safety threat to other students and staff.”

Despite his
behavioral issues, Alessa’s mother said she gave her son new clothes and cell
phones.

“He was a spoiled kid,” she told the Times. “He acted like a
teenager. He thought he was a king.”

In 2005, Alessa reportedly met
Almonte, a naturalized citizen of Dominican descent who in the previous year had
converted from Catholicism to Islam. Almonte, who had been arrested for bringing
a knife to school and drinking beer in a public park, reportedly visited local
mosques and called himself Omar.

A year later, the FBI received a tip
that the two men discussed holy war and killing non-Muslims, prompting
authorities to begin to “keep a watch” on them, according to the Times. The men
traveled to Jordan in February 2007 hoping to be recruited by a militant
jihadist group, the FBI said. By 2008, Almonte was posting quotations from
jihadist clerics on his Facebook page and searches of his computer revealed he
was following teachings from al-Qaida leaders, including Osama bin
Laden.

The undercover New York policeman infiltrated their inner circle
in 2009, The Star-Ledger reported. Nadia Alessa told CNN she told her son she
was suspicious of his new friend.

“Since I saw him, I warned my son and
Carlos,” she said. “But my son say, ‘Always you say about my friends they are
undercover.’ ”

Authorities allege that Alessa and Almonte’s separate
flights to Egypt on June 5 were part of their plot to go to Somalia to join
al-Shabaab, which in 2008 was designated a terrorist organization by the U.S.
government. The men were arrested and charged with conspiring to kill, maim and
kidnap persons outside the country. They were denied bail last week by a federal
judge who called them a flight risk and a potential danger to the
public.

A Swedish woman claiming to be Alessa’s fiancee, 19-year-old
Siham Abedar, 19, told New Jersey’s The Record she broke
down in tears after learning of his arrest. She said she was waiting for him in
Egypt, where they planned to marry. She denied Alessa wanted to “do jihad or
whatever.”

“I know it’s not true,” she said. “I know he wanted to get
married. He wanted to have kids. He wanted to do a lot of things.”

Filed under: Nation, Crime, Top
Stories

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PAXIL: Athlete Wrongly Given Pacemaker for Paxil-Induced Heart Malfunction – FL

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Although Paul’s case is an older case I have only this week found my copy
of excellent this article so had not been able to send it out before now,
but feel it is extremely important to include in our database. Others need to be
aware of the effects of SSRI antidepressants upon the heart, even in those who
are in excellent physical condition. I would encourage you to read the entire
article as it is full of very important information of drug approvals, financial
ties between drug companies and the FDA, Paxil withdrawal effects, the common
ignorance of doctors about these adverse effects and their unwillingness to
admit them even in the face of glaring evidence.
___________________________________________
His “abnormal” heart rhythms come from having the benign “athletic
heart syndrome,” a sign of a super heart. The original fainting was probably due
to taking Paxil; the later problems were likely due to withdrawal from it.
Even with this confirmation, Paul had to go to more than 20 doctors
before he found one who would remove the pacemaker. Paul is recovering from his
ordeal; he is able to walk a mile now, although previously he could run 50.

www.purewatergazette.net/scienceofdeceit.htm

The Science
of Deceit

by Burton Goldberg

The mainstream media
regularly reports on the “dangers” of “unproven” herbal remedies and
supplements. But what is the reported number of people who have died from using
herbs and supplements? According to the FDA, between 1993 and 1998, federal,
state and local agencies reported a total of 184 deaths, most of which were
associated with weight loss formulas. Compare that to the reported number of
people who die in hospitals because of the side effects of properly prescribed
pharmaceutical drugs: more than 100,000, every year. You can add to that the
number of patients killed in hospitals because of “medical errors”: another
100,000 or so. Those statistics are from the Journal of the American Medical
Association (JAMA). This means that the ordained guardians of our health kill as
many people every week as died in the September 11 terrorist attacks.

And that number only includes people who died in hospitals. A 1998
JAMA article estimated that more than 2 million people require hospitalization
every year because of the adverse side effects of drugs. Moreover, it is widely
conceded that the number of adverse reactions and fatalities attributable to
prescription drugs is actually many times the number
reported.

Statistics aside, let’s put a face on what I’m
talking about. Paul Domb is the son of a dear friend of mine. Two years ago,
Paul was a 41-year-old endurance athlete who had run thousands of road races,
hundreds of triathlons and other world-class endurance events. Paul had
regularly trained twice a day for 20 years to stay in competitive shape, so it
was hard for him to understand why he should begin to experience anxiety and
panic attacks. He went to a psychologist who, after a few sessions, recommended
that Paul take the antidepressant drug Paxil. Paul was reluctant, but his
anxiety was affecting his work in corporate real estate, so he started taking a
daily dose of 20 mg.

About three weeks later, Paul was set to begin
an early morning swim when he felt his heart suddenly speed up. For the first
time in his life, he felt faint and lost consciousness. He fell backward,
crashing onto a metal pool chair. He revived after several seconds, and felt
ready to continue his workout, but his training partner convinced him to take it
easy and go home. Paul related the incident to his wife, who insisted he go to
the hospital for an examination.

At the hospital, he underwent an
extensive battery of tests. They took Paul’s medical history, asking what
medications he was on, and took brain scans, electrocardiograms and various
other tests. Paul’s electrocardiogram measuring his heartbeat rhythms showed an
unusual pattern. A cardiologist specializing in heart rhythms was called in. He
told Paul that he needed to put a catheter up Paul’s groin to stimulate the

heart in an effort to reproduce the earlier arrhythmia. Paul refused, but the
physician told him that a previous patient with the same symptoms who refused
the test died soon after. Scared into it, Paul took the test. Afterward, the
doctor came back with the bad news: Paul had a rare disorder called Brugada
Syndrome. Without having a pacemaker/defibrillator inserted, he was told, his
heart could suddenly stop and he could drop dead at any moment.

There was worse news: The disease was genetic and the possibility
existed that Paul’s 5-year-old daughter had the same condition and could die at
any time.

Paul had the pacemaker inserted. Unfortunately, his
doctors did not take into account that he was a competitive athlete, and they
set the parameters of the pacemaker wrong. Whenever Paul went to sleep, his

heart rate dropped below “standard,” and the device would rapidly pace his
heart. Paul was unable to get more than two hours of sleep at a time. Although
the doctors eventually reset his pacemaker, that was just the beginning of what
became almost six months of physical and emotional hell. He was nauseated, but
vomiting brought no relief. He frequently had convulsions. Electric shocks would
shoot through his body 30 or 40 times a day, sometimes violent enough to cause
him to fall. He started having recurring thoughts of suicide ‹or violence
toward others. And through it all he was tortured by the fear that his daughter
was going to die because of the genes he had passed on to her. Paul traveled the
country, seeking an answer, but no doctor could help him. So Paul buried himself
in research, trying to find a solution to his problems. And then one day he
happened to catch the TV news show 20/20. On it were people describing exactly
the same symptoms as he had, only they didn’t have Brugada Syndrome ‹they were
suffering side effects of trying to withdraw from Paxil.

Paul could
hardly believe it. His doctor had told him to stop taking Paxil before his heart
surgery. Paul started studying Paxil, and what he found shocked and enraged him.
He discovered an astounding pattern of apparently deliberate deception by
SmithKline Beecham (now called GlaxoSmithKline), the manufacturer of Paxil,
withholding information on the dangers of this drug from the FDA and the medical
community. In June 2001, GlaxoSmithKline lost a lawsuit when a Wyoming jury
awarded $6.4 million to the family of a man who killed three relatives and
himself after taking the antidepressant. The verdict was based on the company’s
failure to sufficiently warn doctors and patients that the effects of the drug
could include violence. It has since come to light that 20% of patients
worldwide who were prescribed Paxil for depression stopped taking it because of
suffering adverse effects. And effects of withdrawal include intense insomnia;
vertigo; electric shocks; profuse night sweats; nausea; extreme confusion;
intense fear of losing sanity; and thoughts of suicide and homicide. A class
action filed in San Diego, representing thousands of victims of Paxil is
pending.

Paul then went to an expert: Pedro Brugada, the physician
son of Dr. Ramon Brugada, for whom the condition is named. Brugada the younger
looked at all of Paul’s records and told him that he didn’t have Brugada
Syndrome. Other experts concurred. Paul was told that the hospital’s original
procedure to reproduce arrhythmia “would’ve brought a horse down.” His
“abnormal” heart rhythms come from having the benign “athletic heart syndrome,”
a sign of a super heart. The original fainting was probably due to taking Paxil;
the later problems were likely due to withdrawal from it.

Even with
this confirmation, Paul had to go to more than 20 doctors before he found one
who would remove the pacemaker. Paul is recovering from his ordeal; he is able
to walk a mile now, although previously he could run 50. Despite off-the-record
confirmations of incompetence and negligence in Paul’s misdiagnosis and
treatment, not one physician would sign a letter to that effect, or agree to
testify on his behalf. Now, multiply Paul’s story by thousands, by millions,
every year, and you can understand my anger over sensationalistic headlines
about the “dangers” of taking herbs like St. John’s wort.

Here are
some truths about the “scientific” testing of pharmaceutical drugs that you
probably are not aware of. Did you know that the research information contained
in the Physicians’ Desk Reference  (the pharmaceutical bible used by M.D.s
)is supplied by the drug manufacturers themselves? Did you know that the FDA
approves drugs not by actually doing the testing, but simply by reviewing
studies submitted by the drug manufacturers? Did you know that a drug
manufacturer needs to submit only two studies showing satisfactory results to
get a drug approved by the FDA‹even if there are even more studies showing the
drug causes adverse reactions in an unacceptably high number of cases?

Did you know that most of the articles discussing the efficacy of
drugs that are published in medical journals are studies paid for by the drug
manufacturer? And that often, as the New York Times reported last summer, the
academic scientists listed as lead authors are often just “window dressing, to
lend credibility to papers that are really the work of drug companies. The
academic scientists’ main role in such studies is to recruit patients and
administer experimental treatments. The scientists or their universities are
paid for this work.”

And did you know that a study conducted by USA
Today found that more than half of the experts hired to advise the government on
the safety and effectiveness of medicine had a direct financial interest in the
drug or topic were asked to evaluate? An analysis of financial conflicts of
interest at 159 FDA advisory committee meetings from January 1, 1998, through
June 30, 2000, found that at 92% of the meetings, at least one member had a
financial conflict of interest, while at 55% of meetings, half or more of the
FDA advisers had conflicts of interest. These conflicts included helping a
pharmaceutical company develop a medicine, then serving on an FDA advisory
committee that judges the drug.

You may not know that a significant
portion of your tax dollars earmarked for healthcare goes to research on
patentable drugs that make billions of dollars for drug companies. The
government should fund research into nontoxic, non-patentable remedies at a much
higher level than it is presently doing. This situation again points out the
need for political action, for campaign reform. For 2001, the budget for the
National Institutes of Health was $20 billion. This amount could be doubled by
2003. Approximately 83% of this is spent on research performed outside the NIH.
This is serious money, and most of it goes to developing patentable drugs.

A recent article in the New York Times revealed that the
pharmaceutical industry spent $177 million on lobbying in 1999 and 2000: That’s
$50 million more than their nearest rival, the insurance industry. They employ
more lobbyists (625) than there are members of Congress ‹and more than half of
the lobbyists are former members of Congress, congressional staff members or
government employees.

This shows how important it is to get involved
politically, and work for campaign-finance reform. It’s also time for individual
physicians to take responsibility for their actions, and stop being pawns in the
economic games played by the drug and health insurance industries. Physicians
will change only if their patients demand it. Reform will only come from market
forces, which means you: how you spend your money on healthcare, and on
charitable and political donations. Get informed, take responsibility for your
own health, and choose your doctors and medicines wisely.

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PAXIL: Acquitted of DUI: Involuntary Intoxication: Virginia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy
(www.drugawareness.org):

Because the package insert for Paxil
warns that this antidepressant does produce “alcohol cravings” and we know how
common it is for mania to be induced by SSRIs, with one type of mania being
“Dipsomania” – an overwhelming compulsion to drink alcohol” – this
information needs to be spread far and wide ASAP! Patients are NOT warned
of this when they are given this drug! Few are even given the package insert
which is a “failure to warn” on the part of both the drug maker and the
pharmacist. How many DUIs are being caused by the SSRI antidepressants? We know
that DUIs in middle aged women, the main users of SSRIs, have DOUBLED over
a recent 10 year period. Is there a connection? As a society we need to know.
Where is MADD on this issue?
___________________________________________
The Fifth case from the end reads:  “Defendant was on Paxil, an
anti-depressant drug, and had a few drinks after playing golf. He was arrested
and charged with DUI after weaving through traffic.  He was “obviously
impaired” according to his lawyer.  ‘The worst I’d ever seen in 25 years’.”

“An expert testified that Paxil, taken with alcohol, has an “additive
effect” in some people.  The Defendant was never told about this.  The
Court acquitted the Defendant because to self-administer an intoxicant, one must
be aware that they are consuming an intoxicant.

http://virginiadui.poweradvocates.com/dui_defenses.html

4.
Involuntary Intoxication .  Commonwealth v. Moore, February, 2003 (Fairfax
Co. GDC).

Defendant was on Paxil, an anti-depressant drug, and had a few
drinks after playing golf.  He was arrested and charged with DUI after
weaving through traffic.  He was “obviously impaired” according to his
lawyer.  “The worst I’d ever seen in 25 years.”

An expert testified
that Paxil, taken with alcohol, has an “additive effect” in some people.

The Defendant was never told about this.  The Court acquitted the Defendant
because to self-administer an intoxicant, one must be aware that they are
consuming an intoxicant.

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SSRIs: Sharp Drop in Brain Activity + Worsening Depression & Suicidality

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Hopefully if you have followed my work or read my book, “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare,” you know that I have made the argument for a decade and a half that antidepressants are the most similar drugs we have ever seen to dissociative anesthetics like PCP or Ketamine. They just work in a little slower motion is all. This research would confirm that by showing adrop in brain activity within ONLY 48 hours of use! All one needs to do is go to the one color page inmy book with brain wave patterns of a 31 year old male on Prozac for six months. The brain waves show that the patient is in a total anesthetic sleep state and dreaming while talking with those doing the test on him!
_______________________________________
Paragraph five reads:  “Prior research, Hunter said, has shown that between 8 and 14 percent of depressed patients develop thoughts of suicide while taking the most common forms ofdepression drugs, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Although reports have suggested that SSRIs are to blame, no firm link between these drugs and thoughts of suicide has been established.”

Paragraphs seven and eight read:  “The researchers treated 72 people suffering from majordepressive disorder (MDD) with one of two SSRIs, fluoxetine or venlafaxine, or with a placebo. All were evaluated by a clinician using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a standard instrument that assesses the severity of a wide range of depression symptoms. Of the 37 participants on medication,five (13.5 percent) had worsening thoughts of suicide.”

“All of the participants were also examined using QEEG, which evaluates brain function based on thebrain‘s electrical activity. Among the 13.5 percent of participants who got worse, the researchersfound a sharp drop in brain activity within 48 hours of the start of medication. The dropoccurred in the midline and right-frontal sections of the brain, areas known to control emotions.”

SSRI Stories note:  In regard to placebo & suicidality, it should be remembered that the majority of placebo patients are ‘wash-out’ patients from other antidepressants and thus are actually inantidepressant withdrawal which can be extremely dangerous.

http://www.physorg.com/news189972383.html

Simple test can detect signs of suicidal thoughts in people taking antidepressants

April 8, 2010 By Mark Wheeler

(PhysOrg.com) — UCLA researchers have developed a non-invasive biomarker that may serve as a type of early warning system for doctors and patients.

While antidepressant medications have proven to be beneficial in helping people overcome majordepression, it has long been known that a small subset of individuals taking these drugs can actually experience a worsening of mood, and even thoughts of suicide. No clinical test currently exists to make this determination, and only time  usually weeks  can tell before a psychiatrist knows whether a patient is getting better or worse.

Now, UCLA researchers have developed a non-invasive biomarker, or indicator, that may serve as a type of early warning system.

Reporting in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Aimee Hunter, an assistant research psychologist in the UCLA Department of Psychiatry, and colleagues report that by using quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG), a non-invasive measurement of electrical activity in the brain, they were able to observe a sharp reduction of activity in a specific brainregion in individuals who proved susceptible to thoughts of suicide  within 48 hours of the start of treatment.

Prior research, Hunter said, has shown that between 8 and 14 percent of depressed patients develop thoughts of suicide while taking the most common forms of depression drugs, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Although reports have suggested that SSRIs are to blame, no firm link between these drugs and thoughts of suicide has been established.

This study suggests, for the first time, a link between worsening suicidality and specific changes inbrain function while on these medications.

The researchers treated 72 people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD) with one of twoSSRIs, fluoxetine or venlafaxine, or with a placebo. All were evaluated by a clinician using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a standard instrument that assesses the severity of a wide range of depression symptoms. Of the 37 participants on medication, five (13.5 percent) had worseningthoughts of suicide.

All of the participants were also examined using QEEG, which evaluates brain function based on thebrain‘s electrical activity. Among the 13.5 percent of participants who got worse, the researchers found a sharp drop in brain activity within 48 hours of the start of medication. The drop occurred in the midline and right-frontal sections of the brain, areas known to control emotions.

Of note, eight of the 35 participants taking a placebo (22.9 percent) also had increased thoughts of suicide. However, the placebo participants did not show the precipitous drop in brain activity within the first 48 hours.

“This is the first study to show a change in brain function after the start of medication that appears to be linked to the subsequent development of worsening thoughts of suicide during antidepressant treatment,” Hunter said. “Importantly, changes in this biomarker did not predict worsening suicidal thoughts in the placebo-treated subjects, so the results suggest that the biomarker specifically detected medication-related worsening only.”

QEEG is a relatively inexpensive instrument that is non-invasive; measurements are obtained by placing electrodes on the scalp. As a result, Hunter said, further development of this biomarker could potentially lead to a tool that could be used by clinicians to predict, in the early stages of treatment, whether an individual suffering from depression will develop thoughts of suicide.

Provided by University of California Los Angeles

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Girl (11) From Bedwetting to Agitation & Psychotic Break

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

What a TRAGIC case and all too common! It compares with the
case of the 15 year old girl given Zoloft for warts – yes warts – and ended up
committing suicide. Of course Pfizer tried as hard as they could, albeit
unsuccessfully, to convince the court in her wrongful death suit that it
was the warts that drove her to suicide, not the Zoloft! And this case is also
very similar to the case of the little girl I discuss in my book, “Prozac:
Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” who was given Prozac because as
an A student it was felt she spent too much time doing homework! (I thought that
was how you became an A student!) She was described before the meds as an
excellent student and well behaved child.  Yet, within days on
Prozac she was throwing herself downstairs. They then took her off the meds
and then put her back on the meds at higher doses and the Yale
study ends with her pulling her hair out and being locked in a psych
ward where she would jump up and down on her Teddy Bear screaming “Kill, kill!
Die, Die!” As I have asked for years, how many productive and caring lives have
we cut off from us all by these deadly drugs?!
Paragraph three reads:  “He also includes the stories of
individual patients, all of whom fared poorly on psychiatric medications and did
better after coming off them. One was of a young woman from Seattle
prescribed an antidepressant at age 11 to treat her bed-wetting, who then became
agitated and spiraled into full-blown psychosis.
When Whitaker met her
at age 21 she was living in a group home for the severely mentally ill, mute,
and withdrawn. Her story is heartbreaking, and the implication is that her
deterioration was triggered by the medications she was given.”

http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2010/04/14/tying_the_rise_in_mental_illness_to_drugs_used_in_its_treatment/

Tying the rise in mental illness to drugs used in its treatment

By Dennis
Rosen

April 14, 2010

ANATOMY OF AN EPIDEMIC: Magic Bullets,
Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America
By
Robert Whitaker

Crown, 416 pp., $26

In “Anatomy of an Epidemic’’
Whitaker presents his theory that the dramatic increase in mental illness in the
United States since World War II is the direct result of the medicines
psychiatrists have been prescribing to treat it, and that this itself stems from

an unholy alliance between the pharmaceutical industry and corrupt physicians.
However, although extensively researched and drawing upon hundreds of sources,
the gaps in his theory remain too large for him to succeed in making a
convincing argument.

Whitaker cites studies showing better outcomes for
patients with depression or schizophrenia who have come off their medications
than for those who have stayed on them, but doesn’t consider the possibility
that this may be because those with milder disease recovered and no longer
needed medications, while those who were sicker to begin with simply could not
do without them.

He also includes the stories of individual patients, all
of whom fared poorly on psychiatric medications and did better after coming off
them. One was of a young woman from Seattle prescribed an antidepressant at age
11 to treat her bed-wetting, who then became agitated and spiraled into
full-blown psychosis. When Whitaker met her at age 21 she was living in a group
home for the severely mentally ill, mute, and withdrawn. Her story is
heartbreaking, and the implication is that her deterioration was triggered by
the medications she was given.

But how can one be certain of this?
Perhaps she was destined for mental illness through a combination of her genes
and the environment in the same way that some children develop cancer,
irrespective of any medications they may be taking. Perhaps without the
medications given to treat her psychosis her course would have been even worse.
Many children are treated with tricyclics for bed-wetting and the vast majority
do fine. A single case does not prove the rule, and here lies the basic problem
of this book. As Whitaker himself points out, there simply are not enough data

from well-designed, trustworthy studies. And without this information, it is
impossible to conclude anything meaningful about cause and effect.

Though
there remain unanswered questions about the efficacy of some psychiatric
medications in some patients and their long-term consequences, there is no
denying that they have brought about a huge improvement in quality of life for
millions. While it is reasonable for Whitaker to raise his concerns, it is
critical to remember that hypothesis is no substitute for data.

Ignoring
this can lead to disastrous consequences, such as occurred in South Africa at
the turn of this century. Thabo Mbeki, then president of that country, refused

to accept that AIDS was caused by the HIV virus, believing instead that it was a
side effect of malnutrition and the medications used to treat AIDS itself. In
the absence of an effective treatment and prevention program, it is estimated
that 365,000 South Africans died prematurely of AIDS between the years 2000-05
(currently, 18.1 percent of South African adults have HIV/AIDS).

Those
who would seize the opportunity to cast psychiatry as a discipline into the
rubbish heap without consideration for the benefits it has brought to so many
would do well to remember how Mbeki’s inability to distinguish between theory
and fact exacted such an enormous toll in human life and
suffering.

Dr. Dennis Rosen is a pediatric lung and sleep specialist
at Children’s Hospital Boston and an instructor in pediatrics at Harvard Medical
School.
[]
© Copyright 2010 Globe Newspaper
Company.

621 total views, 1 views today

LEXAPRO: Journalist Has Side-Effects: Not Sure Lexapro is Working: U.S…

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

From the last paragraph in the article below I quote the author: “I will say only this: I no longer count on Lexapro to make me well. Which is to say I no longer fret if I miss a day or two, I no longer rush to the drug store to get my refills, and I place far more importance on getting my life in order: regulating my alcohol consumption, getting a decent night’s sleep, exercising (I’m not the only depressive who’s become an amateur triathlete) and, corny as it sounds, pausing at intervals to ponder my blessings.”

Although there are some good ideas mentioned here that I have been recommending forever for depressives such as the great importance of sleep and exercise and counting one’s blessings, there are other things that could produce life-threatening consequences for both the author who is using an SSRI or those around him. Those areas of grave concern are the consumption of alcohol with an antidepressant and the lack of concern about skipping a pill or picking up a refill for his Lexapro – both all too common with antidepressant users.

Why are they common although dangerous? They are common because of two side effects produced by these drugs:

1, Antidepressants can produce overwhelming cravings for alcohol as well as a tolerance for alcohol and then when mixed can produce toxic effects leading to psychotic breaks.

2. Antidepressants produce what the patients call the “I don’t give a damn” attitude leading one to not care about missing a pill or refilling a prescription. The grave concern with this is the warning put in place by the FDA along with the Black Box warning of suicide. That FDA warning is that ANY ABRUPT CHANGE IN DOSE of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis – generally a manic psychosis. Skipping a pill is an abrupt change in dose as is starting or stopping the use of one of these drugs or switching the brand of antidepressant you are taking. If you survive a manic psychosis instead of being told what caused that psychotic break, you will likely be diagnosed as Bipolar and/or spend the rest of your life in prison for what you did while psychotic. The possibilities can be more than just frightening!

Paragraphs 18 through 22 read:

” ‘How’s the Lexapro working’?”

” ‘I don’t know’.”

‘Agnosticism, I’ve found, is a common refrain among my medicated friends. We’re feeling OK, thanks. Is it the pill? Natural cycles? A good week at work? The fact that the sun is shining? Not always apparent. The only thing we’re really clear on, honestly, is our side effects. Nausea, nightmares, hypomania, agitation, headaches, decreased sex drive, decreased sex performance … the list is exquisite in its variation. My first two nights on Lexapro, I lay for hours on the precipice of unconsciousness, unable to take the last plunge. To fall asleep, I had to get a prescription for Ambien, which I then spent another week weaning myself off. To this day, the prospect of sleep holds a mild terror for me that it never did before.’

‘Oddly enough, the side effects are often the pills’ best advocates. If we’re feeling that crappy, we figure something of great moment is happening inside us. What’s harder to accept is the alternative explanation — that, when it comes to depression, we’re still wandering in the dark. As Charles Barber, author of “Comfortably Numb,” argues, scientists don’t really know how antidepressants work. ‘They change the brain chemistry, but the infinite spiral of what they do from there is very unclear’.”

“So if you don’t know how something works, and you can no longer credibly claim it does work (even some industry spokesmen are beginning to qualify their claims), you’re not left with much of a fallback position. The placebo effect is real — the body actually does heal itself when it believes it is being healed — but it is founded on faith, and in the wake of the JAMA study, it’s becoming harder and harder to maintain that faith except through a rather larger act of denial.”

http://www.salon.com/life/feature/2010/04/05/is_my_lexapro_working/

Monday, Apr 5, 2010 04:01 EDT

My antidepressant gets harder to swallow

As studies shed doubt on certain psychiatric drugs, I wonder: Do I really need my little white pill?

By Louis Bayard

Salon

I take it every morning, right after I brush my teeth. A single white pill, with the letters F and L stamped on one side, the number 10 on the other. It’s so small it nearly disappears into the folds of my palm. You could drop it in my orange juice or my breakfast cereal, and I’d swallow it without a hitch.

And, for the last three years, I have been swallowing my Lexapro — and everything that comes along with it. And, apparently, I’m not alone.

Between 1996 and 2005, the number of Americans taking antidepressants doubled. According to the Centers for Disease Control, antidepressants are now the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in the U.S. — ahead of drugs for cholesterol, blood pressure and asthma. Of the 2.4 billion drugs prescribed in 2005, 118 million were for depression. Whether the pills go by the name of Lexapro or Effexor or Prozac or Wellbutrin, we’re downing them, to the tune of $9.6 billion a year, and we’re doing it for a very good and simple reason. They’re supposed to be making us better.

Which leaves a quite massive shoe waiting to drop. What if these costly, widely marketed, bewitchingly commonplace drugs really aren’t fixing our brains?

The implications are troubling, and not just for the pharmaceutical industry. In a study published last January by the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists conducting a meta-analysis of existing research found that antidepressants were unquestionably “useful in cases of severe depression” but frankly not much help for the rest of us. “The magnitude of benefit of antidepressant medication compared with placebo,” the study’s authors concluded, “may be minimal or nonexistent, on average, in patients with mild or moderate symptoms.”

In other words, antidepressants work, but only because we believe they’re working. If we’re not seriously depressed and we’re taking a tricyclic or a serotonin reuptake inhibitor or a norepinephrine booster, we’d fare about as well with a sugar pill. Which means that antidepressants are, to borrow the phraseology of Newsweek writer Martha Begley, “basically expensive Tic Tacs.”

And so, like millions of Americans, I’m left with the problem of it: that little white pill that travels down my gullet every morning. What is it really doing down there — up there? What if it’s not doing anything? Is there any good empirical unassailable reason that I should be swallowing it day after day after day? If I stop believing in it, will it stop working?

More than half a century has passed since the first antidepressants were prescribed, but it’s fair to say that the opposition to them coalesced in the 1990s, with the explosive sales growth of Prozac. As critics like David Healy and Ronald W. Dworkin warned that Big Pharma was medicalizing sadness for profit, the widespread usage of ironic terms like “happy pills” conjured up visions of smiling zombies wandering through sinister dreamscapes. Eric G. Wilson, in his overwrought “Against Happiness,” actually envisioned a day when antidepressants would “destroy dejection completely” and “eradicate depression forever.”

Looking back, we can see that both critics and advocates were working from the same premise: that these drugs change us in some fairly profound way. (Even pro-drug Peter Fisher [Kramer], in his bestselling “Listening to Prozac,” worried about the cost of making people “better than well.”) But as researchers like Irving Kirsch and Guy Sapirstein are increasingly finding, the truth may shade more toward the comic end of the spectrum. Far from transforming us, antidepressants are leaving us pretty much as they found us. Emperors in gleaming new clothes.

The more I ponder my experience, the less surprised I am. I turned to medication because I couldn’t stop crying in public places — Starbucks was a popular spot — or imagining my death. (Crucially, I never got around to planning it.) And because I realized that although I was meeting life’s core requirements, I was not always exceeding them. And because, after a couple of years of sessions with an empathetic therapist, I came to believe that my wiring really had shorted out, that some form of grayer matter had fastened itself to my brain and was hard at work, siphoning away my joy.

I remember watching the camcorder footage of my son’s first birthday party and being shocked by the sight of myself, staring back at the camera with sad eyes. Depression had always been a sporadic companion, but in my 43rd year, it began to take up permanent residence. I felt like I was walking around on rotting floorboards. I cried. I lost my temper on the flimsiest of pretexts. I saw myself dead.

At which point medication seemed like a reasonable alternative. Before another week had passed, I had secured a low-dosage prescription for Lexapro, prescribed not by my therapist but by my primary-care physician. (Even that’s not quite true. It was the doctor who was taking my doctor’s patients while she was on vacation.)

“Who’s going to monitor this drug?” my partner asked.

“Um … you? Me?”

When it came to Lexapro, all my responses had the same interrogative lilt. If someone asked me how I was feeling, I’d say, “Better, I guess?” When asked if I would recommend Lexapro to others, I’d say: “Maybe kind of?”

This was the most surprising part of the whole experience: that the transformation or malformation I had expected to feel never quite arrived, that in the course of ramping up my serotonin levels, I should remain so freakishly myself.

It is, in fact, one of the amusing side effects of living in the age of pharmaceuticals that you can always compare your lack of progress with those nearest and dearest to you in this case, my mother. Not a lunch goes by that one of us doesn’t say to the other:

“How’s the Lexapro working?”

“I don’t know.”

Agnosticism, I’ve found, is a common refrain among my medicated friends. We’re feeling OK, thanks. Is it the pill? Natural cycles? A good week at work? The fact that the sun is shining? Not always apparent. The only thing we’re really clear on, honestly, is our side effects. Nausea, nightmares, hypomania, agitation, headaches, decreased sex drive, decreased sex performance … the list is exquisite in its variation. My first two nights on Lexapro, I lay for hours on the precipice of unconsciousness, unable to take the last plunge. To fall asleep, I had to get a prescription for Ambien, which I then spent another week weaning myself off. To this day, the prospect of sleep holds a mild terror for me that it never did before.

Oddly enough, the side effects are often the pills’ best advocates. If we’re feeling that crappy, we figure something of great moment is happening inside us. What’s harder to accept is the alternative explanation — that, when it comes to depression, we’re still wandering in the dark. As Charles Barber, author of “Comfortably Numb,” argues, scientists don’t really know how antidepressants work. “They change the brain chemistry, but the infinite spiral of what they do from there is very unclear.”

So if you don’t know how something works, and you can no longer credibly claim it does work (even some industry spokesmen are beginning to qualify their claims), you’re not left with much of a fallback position. The placebo effect is real — the body actually does heal itself when it believes it is being healed — but it is founded on faith, and in the wake of the JAMA study, it’s becoming harder and harder to maintain that faith except through a rather larger act of denial.

Of course, even the most ardent critics of antidepressants caution strongly against sudden withdrawal. (Those side effects suck, too.) And few scientists will deny that drugs help people with severe unipolar depression. But what of the rest of us? Should we find some way to make ourselves believe in our little white pills again? Or should we find other things to believe in? Should we, in fact, begin to rethink our relationships with our brains?

I don’t bring much in the way of ideology to these questions. I’ve always felt that the rise of Prozac and its ilk at least had the salutary effect of removing the stigma attached to depression. Reconfigured as a chemical condition, it could now be owned and acknowledged and treated. But by translating it from the personal to the pharmacological, we may have left people even less empowered to combat it.

It’s bracing to see how depression is treated in other countries, where the relationship between drug manufacturers and physicians isn’t quite so hand-in-glove. Great Britain’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, for example, recommends that, before taking antidepressants, people with mild or moderate depression should undergo nine to 12 weeks of guided self-help, nine to 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy, and 10 to 14 weeks of exercise classes. They should, in short, work on themselves before they can be worked upon.

Unfortunately, as Barber notes, that’s work, and not always pleasant. If we are to be honest with ourselves, we should admit that the drug companies aren’t the only ones who want that pill. We want it, too. If every last antidepressant were to vanish from the market today and a new one were to appear tomorrow, promising greater benefits than before, which of us would not line up? There is, after all, a strength in numbers, whereas grappling with yourself — your self — is a lonely business.

But it is, finally, a necessary one. The little white pill sits in my palm. In the glare of the bathroom light, I give it a good hard searching look. And then once more I clap it in my mouth and swallow it down.

Maybe, as one team of researchers has suggested, it’s the triumph of marketing over science. Maybe, as Samuel Johnson once said of second marriages, it’s the triumph of hope over experience. Maybe I’m just weak.

I will say only this: I no longer count on Lexapro to make me well. Which is to say I no longer fret if I miss a day or two, I no longer rush to the drug store to get my refills, and I place far more importance on getting my life in order: regulating my alcohol consumption, getting a decent night’s sleep, exercising (I’m not the only depressive who’s become an amateur triathlete) and, corny as it sounds, pausing at intervals to ponder my blessings. And also appreciating the ways in which my brain and body regulate their own climate through such time-honored techniques as the crying jag. Which is no less effective for happening in the middle of a busy Starbucks.

Three years and however many dollars later, can I honestly say Lexapro has made me a happier person? No. Has it usefully complicated my thinking? Maybe. In my pre-pill days, I regarded happiness as a form of grace, descending upon me whether or not I was worthy of it. Now I think of it as something that, however elusive, is there to be sought. Swallowing a pill every morning is not, in my mind, an act of obedience but a tiny spark of volition, a sign that I’m willing to find the light wherever it’s hiding. My Lexapro may be no better than a Tic Tac, but it’s a daily reminder that I won’t take depression’s shit lying down.

379 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: NC man gets 27 years in mother’s beating death

YET ANOTHER INDICATION OF HOW HORRIFIC
ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL CAN BE. REACHING FOR ILLEGAL DRUGS OR ALCOHOL IN ORDER
TO LESSEN THE WITHDRAWAL EFFECTS WHEN YOU CANNOT GET YOUR ANTIDEPRESSANT IS A
COMMON REPORT.

His attorney says Heath had been drinking and smoking
crack the night of the killing. She also says her client had been waiting for an
appointment at a Veteran’s Affair clinic for a refill of his antidepressant
medication.

NC man gets 27 years in mother’s beating death

The Associated Press
Posted: Friday, Apr. 30, 2010

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A North Carolina man has been sentenced to nearly three
decades in prison in the beating death of his 83-year-old mother.

The Charlotte Observer reported that 56-year-old Jerry Heath was sentenced to
27 years in prison after pleading guilty Thursday to second-degree murder.

Authorities say Heath killed his mother over $35. Prosecutors say Jerry Heath
hit Annie Heath with a lamp in November after she refused to give him more
money.

The Charlotte man wept as his relatives told a judge they weren’t mad at
Heath.

His attorney says Heath had been drinking and smoking crack the night of the
killing. She also says her client had been waiting for an appointment at a
Veteran’s Affair clinic for a refill of his antidepressant medication.

Information from: The Charlotte Observer,
http://www.charlotteobserver.com

Read more: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/04/30/1407185/ncmangets27yearsin-mothers.html#ixzz0mbP8tmbC

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show details Apr 30 (6 days ago)
NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Welcome to abrupt antidepressant withdrawal!!!! Few things are more
dangerous! I have warned of this for 18 years now and in 2005 the FDA warned
that ANY abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide,
hostility and/or psychosis as a result. How tragic that the Heath family has
learned how true that is by first hand experience. To safely withdraw patients
MUST go extremely slowly down off these drugs.
And the fact remains that if Jerry Heath had substance abuse problems
before his use of an antidepressant he should NEVER have been prescribed one and
if he had no substance abuse problems before the prescription, those cravings
were induced by the use of the antidepressant. I AM SO SICK OF SEEING PEOPLE
WITH THESE PROBLEMS BEING GIVEN THESE DEADLY DRUGS WE CALL “ANTIDEPRESSANTS” AND
THE VA ARE AMONG THE VERY WORST AT HANDING THEM OUT LIKE CANDY!

NC man gets 27 years in mother’s beating death

The Associated Press
Posted: Friday, Apr. 30, 2010

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A North Carolina man has been sentenced to nearly three
decades in prison in the beating death of his 83-year-old mother.

The Charlotte Observer reported that 56-year-old Jerry Heath was sentenced to
27 years in prison after pleading guilty Thursday to second-degree murder.

Authorities say Heath killed his mother over $35. Prosecutors say Jerry Heath
hit Annie Heath with a lamp in November after she refused to give him more
money.

The Charlotte man wept as his relatives told a judge they weren’t mad at
Heath.

His attorney says Heath had been drinking and smoking crack the night of the
killing. She also says her client had been waiting for an appointment at a
Veteran’s Affair clinic for a refill of his antidepressant medication.

Information from: The Charlotte Observer,
http://www.charlotteobserver.com

Read more: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/04/30/1407185/ncmangets27yearsin-mothers.html#ixzz0mbmg96tK

753 total views, 2 views today

Time Released Prozac for Dogs Approved in the UK

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

And who did they pay to “cook the books” on this research?!! Was the same
researcher who just plead guilty to falsifying research for GlaxcoThe initial
studies done by Lilly on dogs and cats demonstrated that the animals given

Prozac began to growl and hiss within days on the drug and the behavior
continued until several days AFTER withdrawal of the medication. Those results
would indicate a contraindication for Prozac being given to dogs as they
have for close to two decades now.

The only thing new with Reconcile, the name of the drug in the US, is
that it is a time release Prozac. All the time released change does is make
it FAR MORE difficult to withdraw from. If your dog happens to be a
rapid metabolizer then he/she will metabolize the drug faster than expected and
go into withdrawal before the next dose is given. And according to FDA warnings
you could have a dog that could be going into a withdrawal reactions
of suicide, hostility, or psychosis. . . . We need to do a survey to see
how many dogs are running in front of mack trucks and trains instead of just
chasing cars once they begin taking this medication. 🙂 🙂
🙂 . . . . Back to the seriousness of this issue, this is an
extremely dangerous way for dogs and humans or any other living creature to take
a drug!

____________________________________

At the time, Steve Connell, Eli Lilly’s manager of consumer services for
companion animal health, said that more than 10million US dogs exhibit strange
symptoms from being left alone too long. [Hmmmmm and how many humans and other
living creatures exhibit strange symptoms from being left alone too
long?!!!]

‘Lilly research shows that 10.7million, or up to 17 per cent, of US dogs
suffer from separation anxiety,’ he said. ‘We’re thrilled that our first product
for dogs can help restore the human-pet bond.’

He said research showed that 73 per cent of dogs taking Reconcile and
undergoing therapy showed better behaviour within eight weeks, compared to dogs

receiving therapy alone.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1252672/A-dogs-life-set-easier-day-pet-Prozac-treat-depression.html

A dog’s life set to get easier with once-a-day pet Prozac to treat
depression

By Daniel Martin
Last updated at 8:58 AM on 22nd February
2010

A dog version of the anti-depressant Prozac has been approved for sale to
British pet owners.

The one-a-day tablet, which tastes of beef, is said to help cure ‘canine
compulsive disorder’ and ‘separation anxiety’ brought on by owners’ long
absences during the day.

Symptoms include poor behaviour, whimpering or tail-chasing.

Spaniel looking sad

Down in the doggy dumps:
Once-a-day chewable tablet, which tastes of beef, has been launched in the US to
help dogs beat depression

The drug, called Reconcile, is also designed to curb the compulsive pacing,
chewing and dribbling which its makers claim is a result of depression brought
on by their owners’ long absences.

The anti-depressant Prozac has been used to cure compulsive behaviour in
humans, and works by increasing the brain’s levels of serotonin, a ‘happiness’
chemical.

Trials involving more than 660 mentally-disturbed pets in Europe and the US
produced improvements in behaviour within eight weeks.

Eli Lilly, the drug’s US manufacturer, said: ‘Treatment for companion animals
is a relatively new area for us.’

They point to research which shows that as many as 8 per cent of dogs suffer
from canine compulsive disorder.

Prozac

Pick me up: Prozac

Critics say dogs are now being diagnosed with ‘lifestyle’ illnesses so that
drugs can be marketed to treat them.

Roger Mugford, an animal psychologist, said: ‘Most breakthroughs in dog
behaviour are achieves by carrying a tidbit and using it wisely, not by
drugs.’

Reconcile has now been granted a license by the UK‘s Veterinary Medicines
Directorate.

However, it was first licensed in the US three years ago for separation
anxiety from being left alone for long periods.

The American Food and Drug Administration said it should be taken with
therapy to modify the dog’s behaviour – and should be taken by puppies as young
as six months.

At the time, Steve Connell, Eli Lilly’s manager of consumer services for
companion animal health, said that more than 10million US dogs exhibit strange
symptoms from being left alone too long.

‘Lilly research shows that 10.7million, or up to 17 per cent, of US dogs
suffer from separation anxiety,’ he said. ‘We’re thrilled that our first product
for dogs can help restore the human-pet bond.’

He said research showed that 73 per cent of dogs taking Reconcile and
undergoing therapy showed better behaviour within eight weeks, compared to dogs
receiving therapy alone.

The drug’s website says: ‘While you may not be familiar with canine
separation anxiety, you are probably familiar with its symptoms.

‘While you are gone, your dog may do one or several of the following: chew
destructively; bark or whine; inappropriate urination and/or defecation; drool;
pace; tremble; vomit – or worse.

‘Separation anxiety is a clinical condition in your dog’s brain. Your pet is
not a bad dog. Your pet’s behaviour is the result of separation
anxiety.’

In Britain, research for Sainsbury’s Bank in 2003 indicated that 632,000 dogs

and cats had suffered from depression in the previous year.

Nearly three times as many had suffered from behavioural problems which could
be linked to depression, such as attacking furniture.

Clare Moyles, Sainsbury’s pet insurance manager, said: ‘People are leading
more stressful lives and unfortunately this can have an adverse effect on the
health of our pets.

‘Cats and dogs can be very susceptible to their owner’s feelings and if they
sense that they are unhappy they can become agitated or depressed.’

Side effects of Reconcile can include lethargy, reduced appetite, vomiting,
shaking, diarrhoea, restlessness, excessive barking, aggression and seizures in
a small number of dogs.

785 total views, no views today

Medical examiner confirms death of 9-yr-old Colony, TX boy was

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This suicide is much too similar to little Gabriel Myers’ (7) suicide
in Florida last year – while in the custody of CPS! He too was on
similar medications when he impulsively hung himself with a shower
hose in the bathroom.

Both types of medications have an FDA black box warning for suicide
for this age group. WHY?!!! Want to talk about him being exposed to
something toxic? This is it! Why as a society do we allow this to
continue?!!! Why is it okay for doctors to give patients drugs that
could cause suicide?

Here is the warning given for Strattera which is prescribed for ADHD.
[And a similar warning was given to all antidepressant and mood
stablizing medications (which Montana was also taking).]

9/05 From Web MD: “The FDA is advising health care providers and
caregivers that children and adolescents being treated with Strattera
should be closely monitored for worsening of symptoms as well as
agitation, irritability, SUICIDAL THINKING OR BEHAVIORS, and unusual
changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of
therapy or when the dose is changed (either increased or decreased).”

“THIS MONITORING SHOULD INCLUDE DAILY OBSERVATION BY FAMILIES AND
CAREGIVERS AND FREQUENT CONTACT WITH THE PHYSICIAN, says the FDA.”
[Emphasis added]

What kind of close monitoring is this when he hangs himself in a
nurses office?! Why did none of the professionals working with Montana
withdraw him from the medications which had been producing these
suicidal thoughts for some time BEFORE he lost his life? I see these
FAR TOO OFTEN and the children are getting younger and younger as
those who should be caring for them ignore these strong FDA warnings
that are the next closest thing there is to banning a group of drugs!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/021710dnmetlancesuicide.12e83ee14.html?so=TimeStampAscending&ocp=5#slcgm_comments_anchor

Medical examiner confirms death of 9-year-old Colony boy was suicide

11:13 PM CST on Thursday, February 18, 2010

By WENDY HUNDLEY/The Dallas Morning News
whundley@dallasnews.com

The Tarrant County medical examiner’s office ruled Thursday that a
9-year-old boy from The Colony committed suicide.

Montana Lance

The determination rules out speculation that Montana Lance’s death was
an accident.

Montana was found hanging in a bathroom at Stewart’s Creek Elementary
School around 1 p.m. Jan. 21. He was taken to Baylor Medical Center at
Carrollton, where he was pronounced dead.

Lt. Darren Brockway of The Colony police said the medical examiner’s
ruling is consistent with police conclusions about the death.

“He’d gotten in trouble at school and panicked,” Brockway said. “He
just felt there was no other way out.”

There had been speculation that Montana watched a television show
about teen suicide the night before his death and was copying what he
saw with no real intention to kill himself.

“We ruled that out as an option after talking to his parents,”
Brockway said. “He didn’t watch that show.”

Also Online

01/25/10: Friends, family stunned by apparent suicide of 9-year-old boy

Link: Leave your condolences for the family of Montana Lance

Still, experts say children as young as Montana may not fully
comprehend the consequences of their actions. A suicidal act may be a
spur-of-the-moment act, like an outburst or a tantrum, they say.

“It was more of a conscious decision he made in a moment of high
anxiety,” Brockway said.

A spokesman for the Lance family could not be reached for comment
Thursday. A police report says Montana’s father had insisted the death
was accidental.

Brockway said Montana had been upset on the day of his death after he
was sent to the office for misbehaving in class. He locked himself in
the school nurse’s restroom and didn’t come out.

After about 10 minutes, the nurse got a key to open the door and found
the child unconscious.

Montana had attached the buckle of a brown cloth belt to a hook of a
device used to help disabled people use the restroom, according to a
police report. He was found with the belt around his neck with his
feet off the floor. Police found no notes or messages.

He had been taking medication for mood swings and for attention
deficit hyperactivity disorder, and had been having suicidal thoughts
for about two years, the police report states.

In 2007, Montana’s parents, Jason and Debbie Lance, sought treatment
for their son for ADHD.

In 2008, they told the doctor that the boy had been talking about
committing suicide, and he was referred to a psychiatrist, according
to the police report.

After Montana’s death, Child Protective Services opened an
investigation to determine whether abuse or neglect were contributing
factors.

That investigation has not been completed, but the family’s other two
children have not been removed from the home, CPS spokeswoman Marissa
Gonzales said.

Gonzales said CPS has had no prior involvement with the Lances and
routinely investigates child fatalities.

With the medical examiner’s ruling, police plan to close their
investigation with no charges filed, Brockway said.

555 total views, 1 views today

SEROQUEL: Man accused of drugging, raping Orem woman – UT

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): ALWAYS KEEP IN
MIND THAT THERE IS LITTLE DIFFERENCE IN THESE ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS AND SNRI
ANTIDEPRESSANTS. THEY ARE VERY POWERFUL SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS INHIBITING
MULTIPLE SEROTONIN RECEPTORS!!! AND ON TOP OF THAT ARE SEROTONIN AGONISTS
AS WELL.

Police say the drug Christensen gave to the victim was a 300 mg
Seroquel, a medication for which he has prescription. The drug is
given to bipolar disorder and is an antipsychotic
medication.

Police say one of the side effects of the drug is
impaired thinking and reactions, and that people should also avoid alcohol
when taking it.

Man accused of drugging, raping Orem woman

Last Update:
2/18 3:20 pm

OREM, Utah (ABC 4 News) – Police say a Utah
County man drugged a woman he met at a bar and raped her.

Police say on
Friday February 12, Orem officers responded to a report of a rape that
had been reported from the night before.

Police say the victim
is a 24-year-old woman from southwest Orem.

According to
police, the victim met 26-year-old Jason Christensen at a bar in
Provo.

Police say both the suspect and alleged victim had been
drinking and went back to her apartment when Christensen gave her a pill to help
her sleep.

After taking the pill, police say the only thing the
victim remembered was waking up for a moment while the
suspect was sexually assaulting her.

After that, police say the
victim doesn’t remember anything for several hours until she woke up and
was undressed.

According to police, Christensen gave the victim the
pill at about 3:00 a.m. on the 11th and she didn’t wake up until 11:00 a.m. the
same day.

Police say the drug Christensen gave to the victim was a
300 mg Seroquel, a medication for which he has prescription.
The drug is given to bipolar disorder and is an
antipsychotic medication.

Police say one of the side effects

of the drug is impaired thinking and reactions, and that people should also
avoid alcohol when taking it.

Detectives caught up with Jason on
Wednesday at the City Center Motel in Provo where he was staying. He was
arrested and charged with Rape and Distribution of a
Prescription.

—-Information from: Orem
Police

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