Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications & heart risks

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Although there have been concerns voiced and many other
studies released on this issue here is a study that was just released yesterday
morning – the morning after Britney Murphey’s sudden death.
____________________________________
Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may increase the
risk of heart disease, heart attacks and stroke in women, a new study
indicates.

Antidepressants up heart disease risks

[Posted: Mon 21/12/2009 by Olivia Fens]

Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may increase the
risk of heart disease, heart attacks and stroke in women, a new study
indicates.

According to researchers, from Uniformed Services University
in the US, women with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who were taking
antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications had an increased risk of
cardiovascular events, compared to women not taking these
medications.

“It needs to be considered that taking antidepressant and
anti-anxiety medications may not be beneficial, and may in fact be harmful for
some women,” the researchers said.

The authors of the study, however,
said further research was needed to examine whether factors such as underlying
depression and anxiety, and not medications per se, may be responsible for these
results.

Nevertheless, they added that the findings of the study
emphasised the importance of emotional and psychosocial factors in women with
suspected coronary artery disease.

The paper was published in the journal
Heart.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Amnesia & Murder: Man Stabs Wife to Death: Nebraska

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side
effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect
for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.  It is no uncommon to be
unaware of what one has done on these drugs.
Also paranoia is listed as an “Infrequent” side-effect
[but not listed as Rare] in the Physicians Desk Reference for medications for
depression.  A person with paranoia should almost never be given an
antidepressant.
_____________________________
Paragraphs 12 through 16 read:  “The report says
Hollister began experiencing  ‘depressive symptoms,’ including
severe insomnia, in the summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a
relative’s purported involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the
report says.”

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom
he believed were ‘plotting’ against him
,” the report says.  ‘He also
experienced suicidal ideation during that time period’.”

“Hollister
sought help from several medical professionals and was
prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.”

“On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was
dead and a knife was beside her.”


http://www.omaha.com/article/20091031/NEWS01/710319900/-1/FRONTPAGE

Published Saturday October 31,
2009

Man competent for trial in wife’s death

By Todd Cooper
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

His mental
state now stabilized through medication, Robert T. Hollister has been ruled
competent to stand trial in the stabbing death of his wife, Jeanie “Ellie”
Hollister.

What doctors haven’t determined is whether the Omaha man was
sane at the time of his wife’s death on Nov. 3, 2008.

In a recent court
document, Lincoln Regional Center doctors said they needed more time to make
that determination. Hollister has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to

first-degree murder.

“Mr. Hollister is competent to stand trial,” the
regional center report says. “Further evaluation is necessary before an opinion
can be offered regarding Mr. Hollister’s mental status at the time of the
offense.”

Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine acknowledged the rarity of
regional center doctors requesting more time for evaluation because they haven’t
reached a consensus regarding a defendant’s mental state at the time of a
crime.

He said a defendant isn’t necessarily insane just because he has
been battling mental illness. However, he said, attorneys will have to wait for
the further evaluation before deciding how to proceed.

With insanity
defenses, the burden shifts to defense attorneys to prove that their client was
insane at the time of the killing. It will be up to Douglas County District
Judge Marlon Polk to weigh any testimony about Hollister’s mental
state.

If the judge concludes that Hollister was insane, he most likely
would be committed indefinitely to the regional center. If the judge determines
that Hollister was sane, he would proceed to trial and, if convicted, face life
in prison.

The initial regional center report by psychiatrist Klaus
Hartmann and psychologist Mario Scalora shows that Hollister, 59, had been
battling depression for several months before the death of his

wife.

Hollister, who has no criminal record, has a master’s degree in
human resources and was employed at Omaha Bedding Co. from 1994 to
2007.

He then worked at his wife’s vintage clothing store, “Weird Wild
Stuff,” from 2007 until the time of her death.

The report says Hollister
began experiencing “depressive symptoms,” including severe insomnia, in the
summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a relative’s purported
involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the report
says.

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom he
believed were ‘plotting’ against him,” the report says. “He also experienced
suicidal ideation during that time period.”

Hollister sought help from
several medical professionals and was prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.

On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was dead and a
knife was beside her.

Police found Ellie Hollister dead in the couple’s
home at 4705 N. 111th Circle.

Detectives found evidence that Ellie
Hollister, 52, tried to fight off her husband, including scratch marks on Robert
Hollister’s face. Hollister told regional center doctors he had “memory lapses
related to the alleged offense.”

“Hollister demonstrated a desire for
justice,” the report says, “rather than undeserved punishment.”

Contact
the writer:

444-1275,

todd.cooper@owh.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Attempts Suicide After Therapist Had Affair with Her: CT

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Those in the psychiatric community report that 75% of those doctors and nurses they work with are on antidepressants as well. Drug reps are telling them they are in a very stressful profession and sooner or later will need to start on antidepressants so they may as well start now! So chances are high that the therapist was also on medication leading to the affair.
_______________________________

Paragraph 8 reads: “In February 2009, after the therapist broke up with the victim, the woman tried to commit suicide while sitting in her car in Meriden, swallowing numerous anti-depression pills. But, she changed her mind after looking at a picture of her young child, according to the warrant.”

http://www.nhregister.com/articles/2009/10/29/news/shoreline/a1_–_therapist.txt
Therapist faces sex assault charges in affair with patient (with document)
Published: Thursday, October 29, 2009

By Susan Misur, Register Staff

GUILFORD ­ After allegedly engaging in a sexual relationship with a depressed and suicidal patient for more than a year, a New Haven-based therapist was arrested this week on a sexual assault charge, police said Wednesday.

Alan M. Shulik, a 58-year-old town resident, turned himself in to police Monday, and is accused of second-degree sexual assault, Chief Thomas Terribile said. The victim reported the incident Aug. 31.

Shulik met the victim when she and her husband went to Shulik for marriage counseling in Shulik’s New Haven office, Bishop Street Counseling. The Cheshire couple attended four to five sessions together, and Shulik requested the husband and wife come separately to appointments, according to Shulik’s arrest warrant.

He soon told the victim that she should e-mail him daily with her feelings about her marital situation, and he would tell her she was “wonderful and beautiful and her husband was not good to her,” the arrest warrant says. It adds that Shulik found the woman to be clinically depressed and sent her to a psychiatrist for medication.

The woman told Shulik she was beginning to have feelings for and becoming dependent on him, and at a mid-June 2008 therapy session, Shulik “had her sit on his lap, holding her hands, hugging and kissing her,” the warrant continues.

Shulik said he was ending their patient-doctor relationship, and the two started dating in late June 2008, frequently calling, texting and e-mailing each other, and having intercourse at Shulik’s Durham Road home. Shulik allegedly told the victim he would break up with his girlfriend so they could be together and get married, the warrant says.

The pair would meet two to three days a week for intercourse at Shulik’s home and office, and also traveled to Boston, New York City and Meriden to have sex in hotels, the warrant reads.

In February 2009, after the therapist broke up with the victim, the woman tried to commit suicide while sitting in her car in Meriden, swallowing numerous anti-depression pills. But, she changed her mind after looking at a picture of her young child, according to the warrant.

When she saw Shulik in May, they began having sex again, but in August, he sent her a text message to say he was out of the state and newly married to his girlfriend. A few days into his marriage, Shulik sent another text message the victim to say he loved her, the warrant says.

In late August, the two saw each other again, but when the victim saw Shulik with another woman at his home, she decided to report him to police.

The warrant provides therapy notes from the victim’s new therapist that say Shulik “violated her trust by having a sexual and romantic relationship with her … he has devastated this family.”

The warrant says Shulik went to police Oct. 12 and voluntarily told them he had had a consensual sexual relationship with the victim. Terribile said the investigation continues, and police are documenting the trips and hotel visits with receipts.

Second-degree sexual assault is defined as a situation in which a psychotherapist and a patient engage in sexual intercourse during a psychotherapy session; a patient or former patient is emotionally dependent on the psychotherapist; or the patient or former patient have sexual intercourse by means of therapeutic deception.

Shulik was released on a promise to appear and is scheduled to be in court Tuesday.

A message left for Shulik at his office was not returned Wednesday.

Susan Misur can be reached at 789-5742 or smisur@nhregister.com.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sex Abuse: Woman (32) Has Affair with 14 Year Old Boy: PA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Finally someone involved in one of these cases is beginning to
connect the dots back to medication. She thought it was the anti-anxiety drugs
without knowing that it is rare for one of these cases not to involve an
antidepressant, not an anti-anxiety med, even though they would certainly
contribute as well. But antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. One of those types of mania is
nymphomania.
TWO ANTIDEPRESSANTS given together???!!!! When are doctors
ever going to learn that they cannot do that without expecting toxic
reactions?!
_____________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228
Park St., Grove City, told Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove
City psychiatrist
had prescribed her four separate anti-anxiety
medications
and two anti-depressants, all of which she
was to take daily.”

Paragraph 5 reads:  “Defense attorney Veronica
Smith said prior to Mrs. Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal life as a wife, mother,
and worker.”

Published October 28, 2009 10:01 pm –

UPDATE: Woman blames drugs for sex with

boy

By Matt Snyder
Herald Staff Writer

PINE TOWNSHIP ­

A former Pine Township woman facing felony
charges for having sex with a boy while he was 14 and she was 32 blamed her
actions on judgment clouded by taking multiple anti-anxiety
medications.

Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228 Park St., Grove City, told
Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove City psychiatrist had prescribed
her four separate anti-anxiety medications and two anti-depressants, all of
which she was to take daily.

“So, essentially the main responsibility for
this is the medication, not you?” asked a somewhat incredulous Miles K. Karson
Jr., assistant district attorney.

“Essentially, yes,” Woodley replied.
She said she does not think she ever would have slept with the boy or been
involved in other petty criminal cases if not for the meds. “My mind was not
clear,” she said.

Defense attorney Veronica Smith said prior to Mrs.
Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal
life as a wife, mother, and worker.

Reed sentenced Ms. Woodley to 6 to 12
months, just under the standard range for statutory sexual assault and unlawful
contact with a minor. She will be paroled after six months, he said, if she
behaves herself in Mercer County Jail.

Mrs. Woodley will also be on
probation for 16 years and must register as a Megan’s Law sex

offender.

According to police, Mrs. Woodley and the boy, who is now 15,
knew each other through a relative. She started picking him up after school in
September of 2008, and went for rides or walks in the park. Her husband once
said the two acted like “two teenagers in love.”

Mrs. Woodley said things
got out of hand Oct. 27, 2008, and she had sex with the boy against her better
judgment.

“After it was all done, remorse set in and I realized what had
just happened. After that I took him home,” she said.

The boy’s father
told police the next day that Mrs. Woodley had seduced his son. Both parents
attended Mrs. Woodley’s sentencing. They did not speak, but Karson said they
wanted to show their continued desire for a prosecution.

The boy told
police he and Mrs. Woodley kissed and talked about getting serious, but both
acknowledged their age difference.

After charges were filed, Mrs. Woodley
sent a letter to the boy while he was on the school bus through her 8-yearold

son. Charges of intimidating witnesses and corruption of minors were dropped in
that case as part of her plea.

Mrs. Woodley said she had sent the letter
because she wanted to know how he was doing. She said she’d sent him letters
through her son in the past.

As part of her probation, Mrs. Woodley will
not be allowed contact with underage children besides her own, unless a
responsible adult is present to supervise.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTs: Murder: Youth Kills Friend: Oklahoma

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________

Paragraph 16 reads: “While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “’I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them’.”

“Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.”

http://www.chickashanews.com/local/local_story_302093409.html

Published: October 29, 2009 08:34 am

The Express-Star

Ronson Bush’s mother Tina Black took the stand on Wednesday to ask the court to spare her son’s life.

On day two of his trial, Bush admitted killing his friend Billy Harrington but still refuses to say he meant to do it. Because of his refusal, Grady County District Attorney Bret Burns is asking District Judge Richard Van Dyck to hand down a death sentence.

The jury was excused when Bush changed his plea to guilty, and now the decision whether Bush lives or dies in solely in the hands of Van Dyck, who will render his decisiion at 10 a.m. today.

“We had a life before alcohol and drugs, we had laughs and family time and we went to church,” Black said. “If a family has not experienced alcohol and drugs, they had better thank the Lord because they’re an ugly thing that make your child someone you don’t know.”

In her plea to save her son’s life. Black said she is not angry with Ronson for herself, but she is angry for her grandson Brennan, Ronson’s son.

“Brennan loved going out in the truck with his dad,” Black said. “He asked me, ‘If my dad got life, do you think they’d let him go out in the truck one more time?’”

Black said she thinks a person can love their children even if they do not like their actions.

“There was something that fired up that anger, that wasn’t normal,” Black said.

The next witness to testify was Gail Poyner, Ph. D., a licensed psychologist who deals primarily in forensic psychology.

Poyner performed a psychological evaluation of Bush and researched the effects of the medications Bush was taking.

Poyner said members of Bush’s family described him as “flipped out,” “crazy” and “paranoid,” and that Bush experiences anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, severe drug and alcohol problems and says his brain feels “itchy.”

“Likely he was misdiagnosed or not diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder,” Poyner said. “He is severely mentally ill and his involvement with crime is highly correlated with his mental illness.”

Poyner criticized the lack of treatment Bush received after he was admitted to Griffin Memorial Hospital in Norman.

“I very strongly believe at a professional level had Griffin offered a modicum of treatment, this (the murder) could have been possibly avoided,” Poyner said. “They simply did not give him any treatment, no group therapy, no individual therapy. It was documented he was suicidal, yet they did not treat him for that.”

Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.

While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them.”

Dr. David Musick, a full professor of sociology at the University of Northern Colorado, also testified.

Describing Bush’s family as “good folks,” Musick discussed alcoholism as a disease and how the “horrific” drug methamphetamine creates powerful addictions in humans.

“The defendant (Bush) has a serious alcohol problem that is overflowing into violence,” Musick said. “As a child, he was a pawn being pulled back and forth by his family who had different parenting styles which creates unbearable pain so he covers up the pain with alcohol and illicit drugs.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Charges for Shoplifting: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic reactions.
Keep in mind that antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. Two types of mania seem apparent in this case:
Dypsomania – an overwhelming craving for alcohol & Kleptomania – compulsion
to take things that are not yours.
Paragraph eleven reads:  “He suffers from
depression and is taking medication for it and on
this day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t
account for why he did it.”


http://www.nwemail.co.uk/news/asda_shoplifter_was_in_severe_financial_straits_1_628597?referrerPath=news/

Asda shoplifter was in ‘severe financial straits’

Published at 13:10, Monday, 26 October 2009

A MAN tried
to flee a supermarket with £270-worth of goods and only enough cash for a taxi
home, a court heard.

Paul Richard Charnley stole the items from the Asda
store in Barrow.

But the 40-year-old was caught.

On Thursday,
Charnley appeared at Furness Magistrates’ Court over the theft.

Mr Andrew
Dodd, prosecuting, told the court: “He went into the store and went round
looking at various items, filling his trolley with various goods.

“Once
it is full, he goes into the cafe area where there is no CCTV coverage and is
observed placing items into carrier bags and into the top of the trolley and
then proceeds to leave without any intention of paying for any goods.”

Mr
Dodd said Charnley was followed by store staff and detained outside.

The
court heard Charnley was in “severe financial straits” and had been out of work

for 15 months.

He was said to be “hungry” and only had £5 on him that he
intended to use to pay for a taxi back to his home in Laburnum Crescent, Barrow.

Miss Karen Templeton, defending, told the court: “He says he is
absolutely ashamed of himself and he has been worried sick about coming here.

“He suffers from depression and is taking medication for it and on this
day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t account for why he
did it.

“He takes this very seriously and is very remorseful about what
he has done.”

Charnley pleaded guilty to stealing items valued at £270.44
belonging to Asda on October 7.

Presiding magistrate Mr Les Johnson gave
Charnley a six-month conditional discharge.

Mr Johnson did not force
Charnley to pay a fine due to his money problems.

Published by http://www.nwemail.co.uk

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Alcohol Cravings & Assault Lead to Fatal Heart Attack: TN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________________
Paragraphs five and six read:  “The official cause of
death for Oteri was listed as a heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist
inflicted by Fagan, and the publisher’s family members maintained
they did not want Fagan to be prosecuted.

Fagan, who
was high on antidepressants and tequila the night of the fight,

was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation
treatment center

.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.upi.com/Entertainment_News/Music/2009/10/25/Songwriter-Fagan-remembers-lost-friend/UPI-64901256488994/

Songwriter Fagan remembers lost friend

Published: Oct. 25, 2009 at 12:43 PM
Order
reprints

NASHVILLE, Oct. 25 (UPI) — U.S. country songwriter Rich
Fagan says he wants his life to honor his publisher-friend Tom Oteri who died of
a heart attack after Fagan cut him
with a knife.

The (Nashville) Tennessean reported Sunday while Fagan did
not face prosecution for Oteri’s death on April 26, 2008, the songwriter holds
himself responsible.

“Part of me died that night, too, but it wasn’t the
good part,” Fagan told The Tennessean during an interview in Nashville. “If I’m
here for a reason, it’s to carry on Tom’s legacy.”

Fagan has written a
string of top hits recorded by country music stars, including “Americana,”
“Sold (The Grundy County Auction Incident),” “Be My Baby Tonight” and “I Miss
You a Little.”

The official cause of death for Oteri was listed as a

heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist inflicted by Fagan, and the
publisher’s family members maintained they did not want Fagan to be
prosecuted.

Fagan, who was high on antidepressants and tequila the night
of the fight, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation treatment center.

“The last
drink I had was that evening,” Fagan told The Tennessean. “I haven’t had one
since, and haven’t had the obsession to have
one.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Serious Asault for Declining to Shake Hand of Stranger: AU

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Please note that this young man had been given antidepressants
two years before after a car accident that was so serious that they other driver
died at the scene. In such an accident the head is jerked so violently that even
though it may not be apparent there is generally a closed head injury as the
brain slams against the skull. Antidepressants are contraindicated in those with
head injuries and in my opinion should never be given after an accident like
this.
For additional reference on this aspect the warnings
on Wellbutrin seem to be one of the most detailed for those with head
injuries.
Second through fourth paragraphs from the end read:  ”
‘His behaviour on that night was entirely out of character,‘  Mr
Clarke said.”

“ ‘Mr Mansfield does not represent an ongoing threat to the
community’.”

“Mr Clarke said Mansfield had been on

antidepressants since a traffic accident in 2006 when the elderly
driver of the car he collided with died at the scene.”

http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/story/2009/10/17/punch-knocks-teeth-out/

Punch knocks teeth out

Kieran Campbell | 17th October 2009

WHEN a man wouldn’t

shake Daniel Liam Mansfield’s hand during Australia Day celebrations he punched
him so hard it snapped a tooth off at the gum.

Tipping the scales at
150kg, Mansfield, nicknamed Tank by his mates, packed plenty of
punch.

His victim, 80kg Joseph Leonard McLucas, was only hit once but
would still undergo more than $20,000 worth of restorative dental
work.

The pair were strangers to each other when they met on East Street,
Rockhampton, on the morning of January 27 last year.

Mr McLucas, 18,
politely refused to shake hands and walked away before Mansfield, 25, landed the
costly blow.

Mr McLucas fell to his knees and started spitting up blood
and teeth.

One tooth was snapped off at the gum and another was knocked
completely out. Other teeth were chipped and loose.

Mansfield walked past
the teenager, telling him he should have shaken his hand.

He jumped into
his car and was driven to a service station where he washed a cut on his hand

from the attack.

Back on East Street, a mate took off his shirt to apply
pressure to Mr McLucas’s mouth before an ambulance arrived and took him to
Rockhampton Hospital.

Mr McLucas was then taken to a Brisbane hospital to

have his lip reconstructed.

On Thursday Mansfield blubbered in
Rockhampton District Court after he pleaded guilty to causing grievous bodily
harm to Mr McLucas.

He wiped his nose with tissues from his pocket as
barrister Jeff Clarke told the court Mansfield was “a young man of high
character” who was “very sorry for what he did”.

Mansfield was jailed for

two years but he will only spend six months behind bars.

Crown prosecutor
Julie Marsden described the Australia Day incident as an “unprovoked, cowardly
attack on a young man”.

Mansfield was supported in court by his
girlfriend and by his parents, who he lives with at Taroomball, between Yeppoon
and Emu Park on the Capricorn Coast.

Mr Clarke handed up in court a large
series of references for the machinery operator who he said “is not the type of
fellow who goes around looking for trouble”.

“His behaviour on that night
was entirely out of character,” Mr Clarke said.

“Mr Mansfield does not
represent an ongoing threat to the community.

Mr Clarke said Mansfield
had been on antidepressants since a traffic accident in 2006 when the elderly
driver of the car he collided with died at the scene.

Mansfield asked his
barrister to offer a public apology to Mr McLucas.

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PROZAC: Alcohol Cravings & Assault with Amnesia: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

Also applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic reactions.
________________________________

Sentences three through five read: “Flavell’s court-appointed attorney Neil Madden said Flavell takes Prozac and was drinking Captain Morgan rum Thursday. Madden said his client “doesn’t remember entering Massachusetts General Hospital. He remembers being with a friend and he remembers ending up in jail.’’

http://bostonist.com/2009/10/23/boston_blotter_sex_offender_homicid.php

Boston Blotter: Sex offender, homicide, robberies
Blotter siren
— A Level Three sex offender allegedly assaulted a woman in a Massachusetts General Hospital bathroom on Thursday. David C. Flavell was charged with assault with intent to rape and assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon and held without bail until a psychiatric evaluation next Tuesday. Flavell’s court-appointed attorney Neil Madden said Flavell takes Prozac and was drinking Captain Morgan rum Thursday. Madden said his client “doesn’t remember entering Massachusetts General Hospital. He remembers being with a friend and he remembers ending up in jail.’’ The victim is a Mass. General employee. Suffolk Assistant District Attorney David Deakin said Flavell has prior sex crimes convictions. [ Globe, Herald]

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Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion So Far to Settle Various Paxil Lawsuits

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Excellent article! Many would still be alive and many more
would have avoided being damaged had they been able to see this coming as
clearly as I did years ago when I began warning about these drugs. But it is not
over! There will tragically be many more losses due to the ability of drug
manufacturers to buy the silence this doctor from Tufts says below should
not happen. These settlements need to be made public!

The one glaring omission in this article is a case I am very
familiar with Tobin vs Glaxo. This Paxil-induced murder/suicide
case was allowed to go to court, rather than being settled by Glaxo.
And after hearing all the evidence the jury ruled
that it was clear that Paxil was the main cause of this tragic
murder/suicide that cost 4 lives in one WY family. They ordered Glaxo to pay
$6.3 Million – in my opinion a very small amount for four lives!

But it will not be the end of these types of cases being filed.
The authors did not figure the losses Glaxo will face from those cases
of murder/suicide so their losses could be far greater than detailed
below.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepresant!

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings
the number of suicide, birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because
it raises the red flag for both doctors and patients that there might be a
problem,” said Dan Carlat, a psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine
in Boston who writes and edits a
blog and a monthly

Psychiatry
Report
. “It would motivate
doctors to dig into the literature even more before prescribing these
drugs.”

  • About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
    haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
    600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.
  • A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million
    to the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after
    his mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst
    estimated the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect
    cases waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.
  • 600 More Cases
  • “A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
    Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
    Kilker verdict.
  • In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
    combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
    200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to
    pay $4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn
    painkiller.
  • Harris Pogust, an
    attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
    are confidential.
  • The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old
    boy who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham,
    of Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged
    Glaxo suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide
    attempts by adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court
    papers.
  • The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
    attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
    confidential.
  • About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average
    of about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an
    average of $300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits
    were filed, according to the people familiar with the matter.
  • Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a
    Houston-based lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in
    court Dec. 2. The settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar
    with the cases said.
  • Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200
    claims linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases
    said.
  • In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
    “conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who
    alleged they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case,
    filed in Los Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in
    February.
Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion to Settle Paxil

Lawsuits

By Jef Feeley and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) — GlaxoSmithKline Plc has
paid almost $1 billion to resolve lawsuits over Paxil since it introduced the
antidepressant in 1993, including about $390 million for suicides or attempted
suicides said to be linked to the drug, according to court records and people
familiar with the cases.

As part of the total, Glaxo, the U.K.’s largest drugmaker, so far has paid
$200 million to settle Paxil addiction and birth-defect cases and $400 million

to end antitrust, fraud and design claims, according to the people and court
records.

The $1 billion “would be worse than many people are expecting,” said Navid Malik, an analyst
at Matrix Corporate Capital in London. “I don’t think this is within the
boundaries of current assumptions for analysts.”

The London-based company hasn’t disclosed the settlement total in company
filings. It has made public some accords. Glaxo’s provision for legal and other
non-tax disputes as of the end of 2008 was 1.9 billion pounds ($3.09 billion),
according to its latest annual report. This included all legal matters, not just
Paxil. The company said 112 million pounds of this sum would be “reimbursed by
third-party issuers.”

The drugmaker has reduced its insurance coverage to contain costs, “accepting
a greater degree of uninsured exposure,” the annual report states. “Recent
insurance loss experience, including pharmaceutical product-liability exposures,
has increased the cost of, and narrowed the coverage afforded by, insurance for
pharmaceutical companies generally,” Glaxo said.

Glaxo Comment

Glaxo declined to confirm the $1 billion figure. “Paxil has been on the
market in the U.S. since 1993. Like many other pharmaceutical products, it has
been the subject of different kinds of litigation over the years,” said Sarah Alspach, a
spokeswoman for Glaxo, in an e-mailed statement. “It would be inappropriate and
potentially misleading to aggregate payments in these various types of
litigation.”

Chief Executive Officer Andrew Witty has moved
to replace revenue lost to generic versions of drugs such as Paxil. Worldwide,
Paxil generated about 514 million pounds in sales last year, or 2.1 percent of
the total. Glaxo closed up 5 pence to 1,303 pence in London trading Dec. 11,
down 8.8 percent from a year ago.

About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.

A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million to

the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after his
mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst estimated
the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect cases
waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.

600 More Cases

“A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
Kilker verdict. He still recommended buying Glaxo shares because a likely appeal
may reduce the amount paid by the company.

In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to pay
$4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn painkiller.

Harris Pogust, an
attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
are confidential.

Paxil Is Different

Paxil’s been different from most drugs,” said Pogust, a lawyer from
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, who is handling suicide and withdrawal cases.
“You’ve had three major personal injury litigations over one drug — the
suicide, the birth defect and the withdrawal cases. To have three significant
problems with one drug is really unusual.”

The company had $11.7 billion in U.S. Paxil sales for nine years starting in
1997, according to documents made public this year in a Pennsylvania trial. In
2002, the year before Paxil faced generic competition in the U.S., sales of the
drug there were $2.12 billion. Last year, U.S. sales had fallen to $129 million.
Through September of this year, sales were $52 million, down 52 percent from the
same period in 2008.

Since at least 2003, Glaxo has faced claims in U.S. courts that some Paxil
users were subjected to an undisclosed, higher risk for suicide and birth
defects.

A Suicide Settlement

The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old boy
who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham, of
Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged Glaxo

suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide attempts by
adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court papers.

The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
confidential.

About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average of
about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an average of
$300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits were filed,
according to the people familiar with the matter.

Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a Houston-based
lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in court Dec. 2. The
settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar with the cases said.

Hasn’t Specified

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings the number of suicide,
birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because it raises the red flag
for both doctors and patients that there might be a problem,” said Dan Carlat, a
psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston who writes and
edits a blog and a monthly Psychiatry Report. “It would motivate doctors to dig into the
literature even more before prescribing these drugs.”

Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200 claims
linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases said.

In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
“conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who alleged
they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case, filed in Los
Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in February.

Glaxo did not admit liability” in the addiction settlements, the company’s
officials said in a March 2009 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange
Commission.

The Other $400 Million

In one of eight accords unrelated to individual suicide, addiction or
birth-defect claims, Glaxo agreed in 2003 to pay $87.6 million to the U.S. and
49 states over claims it repackaged and privately labeled Paxil and another
drug, Flonase, to a health maintenance organization at discounted prices.

Glaxo, denying liability, agreed in 2004 to pay $165 million to settle two
antitrust suits over allegations it engaged in sham patent infringement
litigation to stall approval of generic versions of the drug, court records
show. Of that total, $100 million was for direct purchasers of Paxil, such as
drug wholesalers, and $65 million was for indirect buyers, the records show.

In the same year, Glaxo agreed to pay $2.5 million to New York to resolve
accusations the company withheld safety data about the antidepressant. The
company, calling the claims unfounded, agreed to release safety studies on the
medicine’s effect on children.

In 2005, the company added a black-box warning to its Paxil label that the
drug increased the risk of suicidal thoughts among adolescents, following a
request by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to do so.

The Philadelphia case is Kilker v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. dba
GlaxoSmithKline, 07-001813, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County,
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia).

To contact the reporters on this story: Jef Feeley in
Wilmington, Delaware, at jfeeley@bloomberg.net and; Margaret Cronin Fisk in
Southfield, Michigan, at mcfisk@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated:
December 14, 2009 00:01 EST

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