PROZAC WITHDRAWAL: Woman Runs Away From Home: Kentucky

Paragraphs six and seven  read:  “Kelsey had been depressed and was taking
several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey,
particularly Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.”

“The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only $80
in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her medication
with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard from her.”

http://www.cadizrecord.com/articles/stories/public/200909/10/04SG_news.html

BREAKING NEWS: Authorities looking
for missing Trigg County woman

Franklin Clark, Reporter — fclark@cadizrecord.com

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Authorities are looking for Trigg
County woman who has been missing since the night of Wednesday, Sept. 2, and
they are asking for the public’s help.

Betty Kelsey, 61, was last seen
driving a 2002 red Chevrolet Avalanche pickup truck, according to Trigg County
Sheriff Randy Clark.

Her husband Larry Kelsey reported on Wednesday,
Sept. 2, at about 8 p.m. that he couldn’t locate her, and a BOLO (Be On the Look
Out) was put out nationwide, Clark said, adding that she was placed on the NCIC
around the state and country with her description the next night.

“We
are very concerned about her well-being,” Clark said.

Larry Kelsey said
she is about five and a half feet tall and about 185 pounds, and added that she
had been talking about driving to Land Between the Lake. He also she had been
talking about seeing a friend in Michigan, but went on to say that her friend
hasn’t seen her, either.

Kelsey had been depressed and was taking
several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey, particularly

Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.

The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only
$80 in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her
medication with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard
from her.

Clark said that both the U.S. Forest Service and the Kentucky
State Police have chased down leads, but none of them have lead to Kelsey.
“Hopefully we can turn something up,” the sheriff said.

Clark said
anyone with information that may help find Kelsey is asked to call the Trigg
County Sheriff’s Department at 522-6014.

(For the full, updated story,
check out the Wednesday, Sept. 16, edition of the Cadiz Record.)

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman is 23rd France Telecom Employee to Commit Suidie

Fourth paragraph from the end reads:  “The young woman’s
parents told
Paris Match their daughter had been taking anti-depressant medication for the past five
years.”

http://www.news.com.au/business/story/0,27753,26090474-462,00.html

Letter emerges in 23rd France Telecom suicide

From
correspondents in Paris

Agence France-Presse

September 18, 2009
08:23am

  • Spate of suicides at France Telecom
  • Letter emerges in 23rd case


THE controversy over a spate of
suicides at the communications giant France
Telecom
took a macabre turn overnight with the publication of a suicide
letter sent by the latest woman to die.

“I’m going to become the 23rd
staff member to commit suicide,” 32-year-old Stephanie wrote in an e-mail sent
to her father just moments before she flung herself out of her fourth storey
office window.

Her father passed the final communication to Paris
Match
magazine
(French language), which published it in full yesterday amid a national scandal
over what the firm has itself admitted is an “infernal spiral” of suicides among
its employees.

“When I called you this morning, you said I didn’t seem
quite right. You were right. My suicidal impulses are taking over again. I’ve
decided to act upon them tonight,” the Parisian law graduate wrote.

“Oh,
it’s pointless calling my landlord and getting him to check on me, because I’m
going to end my days in the office,” she added, according to the print out of
the mail reproduced in Paris Match.

I haven’t told my boss, obviously, but I’m going to become the 23rd staff
member to commit suicide,” she said.

France
Telecom has lost 23 workers
in this way since February 2008.

“I can’t
accept the new reorganisation in my department. I’m getting a new boss and I’d
rather die. I’m leaving my handbag with my mobiles and keys in the office, but
I’ll take my donor card with me, you never know,” she wrote.

“Aside from
that, don’t forget to got to my place to pick up Zebulon and Frimousse and to
feed them,” she added, referring to her pet rabbit and cat.

“I’m sorry
that you had to get this kind of message but I’m more than lost.”

The
note was sent at 5:10 pm on September 11. Minutes later, Stephanie dropped from
her office window in a French Telecom client services office in Paris.
Critically wounded, she died two hours later.

The young woman’s parents
told Paris
Match
their daughter had been taking anti-depressant medication for the past
five years.

France Telecom, a former state monopoly now competing in a
deregulated market, has undergone several large-scale reorganisations in recent
years, leading to widespread complaints of stress among workers.

On
Tuesday, following the latest in a round of suicides and attempted suicides,
management promised to look again at its personnel policies.

The firm has
100,000 employees and the rate of suicides among staff is not much higher than
in the general population, but several of those who killed themselves did so at
work or after blaming the firm for their despair.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Commits Suicide: Husband Charged: Florida

Paragraph asix reads:  “Deputies say Ragan and his wife
were having marital problems and his wife was on
anti-depressants.
She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.”

http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpp/news/brevard_news/091409_assisted_suicide_charge

Brevard man charged with assisted suicide

Updated:
Tuesday, 15 Sep 2009, 12:23 AM EDT
Published : Monday, 14 Sep 2009, 5:15 PM
EDT

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) – A Brevard County man has been

charged with assisted suicide after police say he helped his wife kill herself.
Investigators say this is one of the more bizarre cases they’ve ever
seen.

A 4-year-old child was left without his mom after she took her own
life and now he could lose his father too. Kevin Ragan was arrested for helping
his wife commit suicide.

In the frantic 911 call he told a dispatcher his
30-year-old wife was depressed and had been drinking. He says she threatened to
kill herself and admits offering her some loaded guns.

Ragan on 911 Call:
“I was being a smart a** and threw like three guns on the bed. I’m like, then do
it. And, she just picked the 40 caliber hand gun up.”

The rest of the 911
call on that sad day is too graphic to air, a distraught ragan crying and asking
for an ambulance.

Deputies say Ragan and his wife were having marital
problems and his wife was on anti-depressants. She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.

Now more than three months later, after deputies got
confirmation from the medical examiner that the death was in fact a suicide,
they charged Ragan with assisting a suicide. He was arrested and bonded
out.

No one was home on Monday when a FOX 35 crew went to the Ragan home
but neighbors say they are stunned.

FOX 35 checked and found that Ragan
has no criminal history in Brevard
County. 
 

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: WOMAN ATTACKS ANOTHER WOMAN: JAILED 1 Year: UK

Last two paragraphs read:  “He said: “She was on
anti-depressants at the time.
It seems the combination of those
circumstances and difficulties at the time led her to flare up in an
inappropriate, serious manner.”

” ‘There was a conversation and she
reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner’.”

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Mum-jailed-vicious-city-centre-attack/article-1331385-detail/article.html

Mum-of-three jailed after vicious city centre attack

Saturday, September 12, 2009, 07:00

20 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A MOTHER-OF-THREE has been jailed for a
year after attacking a woman she accused of being a prostitute.

Kerrie
Thomas, 31, of Stotfield Road, Bilborough, repeatedly punched the woman in the
face and kicked her.

The victim, who had been out with a friend on
Valentine’s Night, lost her little fingernails as she defended herself and had
scratches to her jaw and a swollen nose.

Police came to her rescue and
tracked down and arrested Thomas.

At Nottingham Crown Court, Thomas
pleaded guilty to assault causing actual bodily harm.

Judge Dudley
Bennett said she would get credit for her plea, but added: “This was a very
serious assault. It was a gratuitous assault, unprovoked, upon another woman of
a similar sort of age.

“You punched her and kicked her in the face on the
floor, and it has had a profound effect on her. The fact remains you have a
number of prior convictions for violence, house burglary, robbery and wounding
in 2001. This kind of gratuitous violence cannot be tolerated.”

The
victim, aged 36, had been with a friend at 2am on Sunday, February 15, when she
was attacked.

She was eating food in St James’s Street, Nottingham city
centre, when she saw Thomas with an elderly friend and went to check he was OK
as she thought he was vulnerable.

Thomas came over, said, “how dare you”,
and accused the woman of being a prostitute and taking advantage of the man, the
court heard.

Robbie Singh, prosecuting, said after Thomas punched the

woman in the face, she fell to the floor and curled up in a ball. She was then
kicked in the face. Afterwards, the victim had bruising to her head and could
not brush her hair or speak properly for a week.

“In April this year she
said she was nervous, her confidence has gone and she has to be met in town if
she catches a bus on her own,” said Mr Singh.

Andrew Wesley, mitigating,
said Thomas was previously in a long-term relationship that broke up against a
background of domestic violence.

He said: “She was on anti-depressants at
the time. It seems the combination of those circumstances and difficulties at
the time led her to flare up in an inappropriate, serious manner.

“There
was a conversation and she reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost

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PROZAC WITHDRAWAL: Woman Runs Away From Home: Kentucky

Paragraphs six and seven  read:  “Kelsey had been depressed and was taking several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey, particularly Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.”

“The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only $80 in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her medication with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard from her.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs 20 through 22 read: “Her fiance told the court they were arguing because he disapproved of her drinking. A Type 1 diabetic, Maitland was also taking medication for anxiety and depression.”

“She said she had not taken her scheduled insulin that night. She told the judge that the medication she’s taken for seven years to treat anxiety and depression affects her memory.”

“‘It makes things a little more fuzzy,’ she said.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.


http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/aug31_09arm.html#Scene_1

Charged for flicking blood

 Ebony Maitland is accused of mischief and assaulting a police bloodElizabeth McMillan
Northern News Services
Published Monday, August 31, 2009

SOMBA K’E/YELLOWKNIFE – A woman accused of assaulting a police officer told a judge Thursday that after responding to an RCMP officer’s request to see her bleeding wrist, he pepper sprayed her, and dragged her to a police cruiser by her hair.

Ebony Maitland is accused of mischief and assaulting a police officer after her blood made contact with an officer during her arrest on July 6, 2008. – Elizabeth McMillan/NNSL photo

Thirty-year-old Ebony Maitland is also on trial by judge in Territorial Court for a charge of mischief.

The assault charge stems from an allegation by police that when she extended her arm, she flicked blood onto RCMP Const. Phil Unger’s face, who was standing about a metre away.

The woman told Chief Judge Brian Bruser she had cut her arm in two places after smashing it through a window during a night of heavy drinking and arguing with her fiance.

During cross examination, Crown prosecutor Diane Keats did not dispute Maitland’s claims about the pepper spray, and being dragged into the police cruiser by her hair, but questioned the accused’s memory about the nature of the interaction between herself and Unger and the manner in which she moved her arm.

Maitland said she recalled being told she was under arrest for causing a disturbance when Unger asked to see her injury. She said she extended her arm with her palm facing upwards.

“He wanted to know how bad it was,” she said. “We didn’t have a conversation. He just asked to see my wrist.”

Unger and another RCMP officer, Const. Jarret MacDonald, responded to a call of a domestic disturbance at Ptarmigan Apartments on July 6, 2008 at around 5 a.m., according to Keats. Maitland was in the parking lot when they arrived, said the prosecutor.

The five-foot-seven, 150-pound woman was barefoot and wearing only shorts and a T-shirt when she was arrested.

Maitland said she was pepper sprayed again while she was sitting in the back of the police cruiser. Keats said it was because Maitland was yelling and smearing blood from her injury on the inside of the vehicle.

The prosecutor said Maitland was behaving aggressively – screaming, swearing and waving her arms in the air when Const. Unger tried to arrest her.

Maitland told the court that Const. Unger threw her against the cruiser before forcing her into the vehicle. “They opened the door and threw me in head first … then they kicked me in the butt,” she told the court.

Keats asked for details about the hours leading up to the parking lot altercation and the soft-spoken woman said she didn’t remember much of the evening.

She told the court she’d been to the Raven pub for several hours that night.

An ambulance attendant testified she told him she had consumed 12 beer.

Keats told the court the two officers had previously responded to a call to the woman’s apartment that evening where Maitland and her fiance were fighting loudly.

Maitland testified she had no memory of their initial visit.

After police left, Maitland and her fiance continued arguing. Maitland said she cut her arm in two places when she hit a window twice. Both Maitland and her fiance said her arm was bleeding profusely when she left the apartment.

Her fiance told the court they were arguing because he disapproved of her drinking. A Type 1 diabetic, Maitland was also taking medication for anxiety and depression.

She said she had not taken her scheduled insulin that night. She told the judge that the medication she’s taken for seven years to treat anxiety and depression affects her memory.

“It makes things a little more fuzzy,” she said.

The fiance said Maitland was extremely intoxicated and he’d been unable to control her. He became flushed and cried as he told the court about watching Maitland interact with the police after she’d been pepper sprayed the first time.

“I couldn’t believe what I was witnessing,” he told the court. “He lifted his boot and kicked her in the butt and started laughing to the other officer.”

An ambulance arrived after Maitland was restrained in the police cruiser. The fiance said he told the driver of the ambulance about Maitland’s medical condition.

Another ambulance attendant, Craig MacLean, testified Maitland resisted treatment, and was swearing and spitting as he tried to assist her.

When questioned by defence lawyer Jay Bran, MacLean said her combative attitude may have been caused by her diabetic state.

When asked about her behaviour in the police cruiser, the ambulance and the hospital, Maitland said she was confused and couldn’t see because the pepper spray had gotten in her eyes.

“I’m not really sure what I was doing because I couldn’t see … I was yelling and screaming because I was in pain,” she said. “My head hurt, my neck hurt, my throat, eyes (and) nose were burning,”

She said she regained her vision after a doctor treated her at the hospital. The injury to her wrist required eight stitches.

After being treated at the hospital, Maitland spent more than eight hours in the drunk tank.

She testified she later received medical attention for an injured toe, which she said was broken by one of the police officers during her arrest.

Maitland said she couldn’t work for two weeks because her job as a cleaner at the hospital required her to be on her feet for long periods of time.

The trial had originally begun April 2, but was adjourned until Aug. 26 and continued until last Friday. The trial resumes Sept. 11.

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PROZAC: Woman Develops Hypomania: Later Diagnosed as Bipolar as They All Are!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): This little piece on antidepressant-induced bipolar disorder ends with the following questions: “What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?”

When you consider that the rate of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by 4000% in a recent 10 year period that the numbers of those answering a resounding YES to those questions is VERY HIGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have publicly stated over and over again and will say it once again, “Antidepressants are the biggest CAUSE of Bipolar Disorder on the planet!”

1. Mania is a continuous series of mild seizures in the brain.

2. Seizures come from over stimulation of the brain.

3. ANTI – depressants, or the opposite of a depressant – a stimulant.

4. The over stimulation of the brain (especially from the shock of abrupt withdrawal from an antidepressant) leads to mania and the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder.

Fourth sentence reads: “. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania.”

http://bipolar.about.com/b/2009/08/31/bipolar-depression-and-antidepressants.htm

Bipolar Depression and Antidepressants

Monday August 31, 2009

My first psychiatric diagnosis was major depression, and my first psychiatric medication was Prozac. It was prescribed by my GP, not by a psychiatrist. I had a one-week follow-up visit, and then I was turned loose. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania. Someone even called me “the poster child for Prozac.” This was in 1994, and I wasn’t diagnosed with bipolar disorder until 1999, after another antidepressant did a similar thing.

What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?

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DEPRESSION MED: Amnesia: Woman Can’t Remember Taking Money: Canada

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.”

SSRI Stories note:  Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side-effect of SSRI antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference.

http://bugleobserver.canadaeast.com/news/article/770522

Woman shows up for trial with ‘lost’ cash

Published Tuesday August 25th, 2009

Nackawic woman found not guilty of stealing community fundraising, but judge finds her story ‘fishy’

A provincial court judge said he could not convict a Nackawic woman of theft, despite finding her testimony unbelievable.

Judge John J. Walsh announced his decision in a Woodstock courtroom Friday morning, finding Julie Boone, 34, not guilty of the crime of theft under $5,000.

“Her explanations were not logical, nor were they rational,” the judge said as he read his decision.

Boone’s trial began in May, as former members of the Nackawic Community Days committee took the stand, testifying about the disappearance of approximately $800 raised at a dance in 2007, a dance held to raise money for Nackawic Community Days, a dance where Boone worked the door and was supposed to deposit the funds raised into an account for the committee.

But somewhere along the way, the money was lost, or, as the Crown alleged, stolen by Boone.

On the first day of the trial back in May, another former committee member, Julie Brown, testified the dance had been Boone’s idea.

Brown said when the committee met following the dance, in June 2007, Boone told the committee she’d dropped the money in the night deposit box at the Scotiabank branch in Nackawic, a total of about $800.

But according to Brown, a bank statement didn’t show the deposit.

Later on, it was learned an envelope containing receipts had been dropped in the night deposit slot at the CIBC branch in Nackawic, which is situated in the same mall as the Scotiabank.

Brown told the court Boone was evasive as the committee tried to track the money down.

“Every time I talked to her there was a new excuse,” Brown said.

Brown said the money was never found or recovered.

The trial was adjourned to Aug. 19, at which time, Boone took the stand in her own defence.

According to Boone, she had worked the door at the Saturday dance by herself, although she said there were supposed to be two other volunteers, but they didn’t show up.

Following the dance, Boone said she’d placed the money in an envelope, which she would deposit the following Monday.

Boone said she’d placed the envelope under the front seat of her car for safekeeping.

The day after the dance, a Sunday, Boone said she decided she’d deposit the money. She said she’d been told by a neighbour about a series of break-ins to vehicles in the area, and decided the money should go to the bank sooner rather than later.

“In my haste, I put it in the wrong bank,” Boone said, offering an explanation as to why an envelope containing receipts and not the money from the dance ended up at the CIBC.

Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.

Boone said she thought she may have sent the money out west by accident. She said she had sent some photos of one of her children to the father of the child, but thought she may have sent the money. She said after communication with the father, she determined the money had not gone west.

So from June 2007 to January 2009, the money remained missing.

But Boone made a startling revelation during her testimony.

It seems the vehicle she’d been driving at the time of the dance had been passed to her sister, then to her father, and in January 2009, was at her parents’ home.

Boone said she had been trying to retrace her steps, contacting anyone she may have dealt with in June 2007 as she continued to try and locate the money.

Boone said she had gone to the vehicle and thoroughly searched it. She said under the trunk of the car, where the spare tire is kept, she located a file folder. According to Boone, the folder contained papers relating to her work on the Community Days committee. She said there was also an envelope containing a significant sum of money, which she said she realized was the money from the dance.

Boone said she had no explanation for how the envelope ended up in the trunk of her car.

“I wish I did,” she said.

Boone produced the envelope in court, to the surprise of Crown prosecutor Christopher Lavigne.

Lavigne told Judge Walsh he’d never seen the envelope before, and wouldn’t be able to consent to entering the envelope into evidence without an opportunity to examine the contents.

Upon examining the contents, Lavigne found the envelope contained $780.50. Of that total, $20.50 was what remained of a float Boone had the night of the dance. The rest was from ticket sales.

During cross-examination, Lavigne said he found it unusual that every bill in the envelope was dated 2004. Boone said she’d never taken the money out of the envelope after she found it, and had never looked at the dates on the bills.

In making final arguments, Boone’s lawyer, Brent Dickinson, said his client’s story was consistent throughout her testimony, despite the Crown’s attempts to poke holes in it.

While the judge agreed the story was consistent, he still found it troubling. “Her story is, quite frankly, fishy,” Judge Walsh said. “It raises a lot of alarm bells.”

But when giving his decision, Judge Walsh said he had reasonable doubt about Boone’s guilt.

“Can I reject her evidence outright?” the judge asked. “I find I can’t.”

Based on the reasonable doubt, Boone was found not guilty. Both Lavigne and Dickinson agreed the money should be returned to the Nackawic Community Days committee.

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ZOLOFT WITHDRAWAL: Nervous Breakdown & Woman Runs Away: Arizona

Second paragraph reads: “Chandler police said Carol Roby, 62, suffered a nervous breakdown after going off her Zoloft, an anti-depressant medication. Her family noticed her missing Saturday when she didn’t meet them for a 2 p.m. meeting. She also didn’t make an 8 a.m. work appointment, police said.”

FROM THE WARNING ON OUR www.drugawareness.org WEBSITE FROM ITS INCEPTIONIN 1997:
Withdrawal can often be more dangerous than continuing on a medication. It is important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs (usually over a period of a year or more depending upon the length of use of antidepressant medications).

http://www.azcentral.com/community/chandler/articles/2009/08/10/20090810cr-adultfound0810.html

Chandler woman reported missing calls family from Tucson

8 commentsby Megan Boehnke – Aug. 10, 2009 10:01 AM
The Arizona Republic

A Chandler woman who was missing over the weekend called her family late Sunday from a hotel in Tucson.

Chandler police said Carol Roby, 62, suffered a nervous breakdown after going off her Zoloft, an anti-depressant medication. Her family noticed her missing Saturday when she didn’t meet them for a 2 p.m. meeting. She also didn’t make an 8 a.m. work appointment, police said.

She left behind her medication and insulin kit.

Roby drove to Tucson and checked herself into a hotel before eventually calling her family.

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PROZAC: Woman Threatens State Patrolman: Missouri

HOW SAD!!! Reminds me of a talk I had with parents in Louisiana just last week who are completely overwhelmed dealing with a daughter with similar problems – ALL BECAUSE OF THE WIDESPREAD PRESCRIBING OF THESE DEADLY AND VERY ADDICTIVE PRESCRIPTION DRUGS!!!! They know she can get them from just about any doctor around.
Doctors have truly become our biggest drug pushers in this country! What on earth are we doing to our children?!!! How can so many families be left alone to deal with this – never knowing from one minute to the next if they are going to find their child unresponsive and dying due to yet another overdose of these drugs?
This country is in SO MUCH trouble and it has NOTHING to do with any outside threat to our nation – it is within.
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac (ETC): Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare! & Audio: Help! I Can’t Get Off
My Antidepressant/Antipsychotic, ect. ()
Paragraphs three & four read:  “According to the criminal complaint, when Parsley made contact with West  ‘her speech was slurred and her eyes were bloodshot and glassy.’  He adds that he did not notice an odor of intoxicants on her.”SSRI Stories note:  “

 

“West reportedly admitted she had taken Xanax and Prozac at 6 a.m. After failing sobriety tests, West was placed under arrest.”

Hostility”  is listed as an Infrequent, but not Rare, reaction to Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

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