On Your Birthday Diana We Reveal WHO Took Your Life While Your Sons Reveal A Statue In Your Honor

The driver on Dodi and Diana’s  fatal last journey should probably not have been behind the wheel at all that night.

The jury’s verdict placed much of the responsibility for the crash on him, more perhaps than even the coroner had suggested in his summing up.
My main focus in writing my book on antidepressants was to wake up doctors to the problems in the serotonin hypothesis & the dangers of antidepressants to stop them from prescribing SSRI antidepressants & help loved ones to see what these drugs were doing to their family members.
The cravings for alcohol was what first caught my attention & got me to start researching these drugs, shouting warnings about them & writing my book on them now titled, Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? Our Serotonin Nightmare!
I was in the perfect place to see the alcohol cravings…Utah where most were non-drinkers. I had two good friends, neither of which ever knew one another, but both had a prescription for Prozac and very much out of character for both, were drinking alcohol heavily. Both aware of my background in studying health for years knew something was wrong & began repeatingly asking me to look into Prozac. Both were active members of the LDS Church which has a strict health code when it comes to mind altering substances including alcohol.
I had understood for years what Dr. James Milam, author of the best seller, “Under The Influence” had also figured out which is that alcoholism is hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). It is the body’s way of pushing an individual in an attempt to balance sugar levels in order to prevent additional loss of brain cells. Physicians are taught to watch closely for any medications which may be affecting blood sugar because of that potential deadly negative impact upon the brain.
When I finally heard the extreme concern in the voices of both friends I stopped by a local pharmacy & picked up a package insert for Prozac & there it was clear as day in black & white. Both hypoglycemia & diabetes had been reported with the drug. My friends were having hypogycemic reactions to Prozac causing them to reach for alcohol to bring their blood sugar back up! The problem is that although alcohol will bring the sugar level back up quickly, it rebounds dropping the sugar even lower causing the person to crave more & more & more. (The sugar connection is very easy to see if you watch a group of people trying to get sober from alcohol because they are eating sugar, sugar, sugar & more sugar to compensate for what the alcohol was doing.) Of course both alcohol & sugar are the wrong way to go to balance sugar. Several years later Dr. Milam & I connected & of course were very supportive of one another. His work was wonderfully spot on as his clinic was having almost ZERO recidivism by putting people with alcohol issues on a hypoglycemic diet.
So after working with the French police on a very high profile murder/suicide case in France in the early 1990’s I did not hesitate to call the police in Paris. I let them know that in the crash that killed Dodi Fayed & Princess Di they had a driver who must be on Prozac to cause him to drink so heavily that night as to have an over three times the legal limit of alcohol in his system. I told them the clues were clear & detailed those for them below:
#1 His parents were adamant that Henri Paul was a non-drinker & the authorities must have someone else’s blood, yet Henri Paul was drinking so heavily that they had given him a drug like antabuse to help him stop.
#2 He also did not appear drunk which is common when on an antidepressant.
#3 He had excessive amounts of alcohol in his system – over three times the legal limit!
#4 Antidepressants are notorious for causing mania/bipolar. In fact when Prozac was first introduced psychiatrists refused to prescribe it because it so rapidly produced mania. But what most are completely unaware of is that one form of mania, “dipsomania,” is described as having “overwhelming cravings for alcohol”!
#5 And the following I was not aware of until this past year when I first saw the attached photo of Henri Paul taken moments before the fatal crash.
 
In that photo Henri Paul had what has long been called “Prozac eyes” indicating he was at a toxic level of this drug & going off the deep end & becoming very impulsive.
As I often point out people on these antidepressants do not have a meter reader on their foreheads which will flash the warning “Toxic Level” when the serotonin is too high.
The police listened to me explain all this & then checked to find within the week that Henri Paul was indeed on Prozac. That of course explained the compulsions he was having to drink alcohol which were out of character for him. The French authorities announced his Prozac use in Paris the day before the University of Oslo introduced my data on antidepressants causing these overwhelming cravings for alcohol.
Sadly no one paid much attention to that in the news of what happened that fateful night or I have no doubt there would have been a wrongful death suit filed against Eli Lilly!
I have little doubt Pharma helped create all the various conspiracy theories around that crash to distract from the fact the driver was drugged out of his mind & on their most popular drug – a drug that caused him to drink heavily which was totally out of character for him.
Eli Lilly was already working to rebuild their tarnished image in France after French investigators had determined that in the horrific murder/suicide case I had worked with them on there was no guilt of the young man who did the killing of his German fiancee & himself, but it was instead the terrible outcome of the use of the American drug Prozac! Their headline news ran the story that way! I am sure they did not want the negative publicity of the press pointing out that Princess Di’s driver was driven to drink by the American drug, Prozac!
Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have such press herein America?! This nightmare would likely have ended LONG AGO if the press had told the truth in all the following tragic outcomes: SSRIstories.net

LEXAPRO: Vehicular Manslaughter: No Alcohol: Idaho

Paragraph three freads:  “The prosecutor’s office
previously alleged Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol,
or was grossly negligent in causing Redfern’s death.
They alleged he had been involved in four crashes on that day, two prior
to the fatal crash and one immediately afterward.”

Paragraphs
seven and eight read:  Stevens failed two sobriety tests, court documents
allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police questioned him. He
reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant.
A
bottle of Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

“However, tests done on blood taken from Stevens after his arrest
came back negative for intoxicants [alcohol], according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.”

http://www.magicvalley.com/news/local/article_82226ad0-3e75-5e78-95fe-27073b884547.html

Stevens pleads guilty to vehicular manslaughter

By
Ariel Hansen – Times-News writer | Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am |
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HAILEY ­ Nearly a year after Bert Redfern died in a
March 10 car crash on Idaho Highway 75 in Hailey, a Twin Falls man has pleaded
guilty to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter for the fatal crash.

Cody
Stevens, 29, of Twin Falls, had been charged with felony vehicular manslaughter.
On Tuesday, just weeks before his district court trial was set to begin, he
pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor, which carries a penalty of up to a year in
prison and a $2,000 fine.

The prosecutor’s office previously alleged
Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or was grossly
negligent in causing Redfern’s death. They alleged he had been involved in four
crashes on that day, two prior to the fatal crash and one immediately
afterward.

According to court documents, Stevens allegedly left his job
in Jerome after a 12-hour shift at 6 a.m. March 10, and drove north. In Lincoln
County, he was allegedly reported as a reckless driver after he got close enough
to “rub mirrors” with the reporting party at about 7:20 a.m. At about 9:45, he
allegedly hit a tree south of Bellevue, telling police he swerved to avoid a
deer.

After leaving his totaled truck in Bellevue and renting a truck in
Hailey, Stevens returned to a Bellevue body shop. He then headed toward Ketchum
when he allegedly caused the noon-time collision that resulted in Redfern’s
death. He then allegedly flipped his rental truck onto a curb in downtown
Hailey, where police took him into custody.

Stevens failed two sobriety
tests, court documents allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police
questioned him. He reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant. A bottle of
Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

Stevens was taken for blood testing at St. Luke’s Wood River
Regional Medical Center, and he was later taken back to the hospital after
becoming increasingly unresponsive and incoherent during police questioning,
according to court documents.

However, tests done on blood taken from
Stevens after his arrest came back negative for intoxicants, according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.

A civil case for wrongful death is pending against Stevens, filed by
Redfern’s widower, and Stevens’ plea to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter can
be used against him in that case.

The county case has been sent back to
the magistrate court, and a sentencing hearing has not yet been
scheduled.

Ariel Hansen may be reached at ahansen@magicvalley.com or
208-788-3475.

Posted in Local, Crime-and-courts

on Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am Updated: 10:57 pm.
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10/13/1999 – Attempted Murder by Man on Zoloft

This case out of Maryland is so tragic. The perpetrator took Zoloft
and now has no memory of the incident. Even his mother said he
“hallucinated” on the drug. The young couple were deeply in love and
had a great relationship. This story, too, combines elements of “road
rage” with the attempted murder.

This is just one of many stories we continue to review, now almost
daily, on how these drugs can cause psychotic breaks in some
individuals and no memory of the violence later. Notice also, how sleep
deprivation, a known side-effect of these drugs, contributed to this
incident.

Thanks to one of our ICFDA directors for passing this along.

As a reminder to interested subscribers, if you see articles like
these, please bring them to our attention by forwarding them to
<mmiller1@…>.

———–
Sep. 22, 1999, The Capital

Police Say Man Tried to Kill Wife

An Annapolis man with no history of prior violence was charged
yesterday with trying to kill the wife he adored in a car crash near
the State House earlier this month.

In a mysterious case that still puzzles city police, Douglas Lund, 36,
of 1 Colonial Ave., was ordered held without bond on a charge of
attempted second-degree murder.

He awaits a competency evaluation today in the county detention center,
where he’s being held. Another bail review hearing will follow within
the next few days, a spokesman for the State’s Attorney’s Office said.

Police have found no motive for Mr. Lund’s actions on Sept. 7, when he
crashed his car on Bladen Street and allegedly beat his wife, Amy Lund,
32, an assistant state’s attorney for Dorchester County.

“They were doing great,” said city police Detective Jim Bryant, who
investigated the case with the State’s Attorney’s Office. “He never
abused her in any way. This was one of those off-the-wall things.”

But Mr. Lund’s mother, Jo Ann Lund, blames the drug Zoloft, which her
son was taking for depression.

“He took the drug and started hallucinating,” she said.

Mr. Lund, a full-time student at Bowie State University, had been
suffering sleeplessness for several weeks and had asked his wife to go
for a drive.

About 3 a.m., they were headed home when Mrs. Lund saw her husband run
a red light and switch lanes on Rowe Boulevard, heading toward the
State House, police said.

Driving toward construction site barriers on Bladen Street, he
allegedly unfastened his wife’s seat belt before intentionally crashing
his 1990 Honda Accord into a metal fence, running over several “Road
Closed” signs without hitting the brakes, police said.

Mr. Lund forced his wife from the car, grabbed her neck and hair and
beat her head against the pavement several times, police said.

Grunting, but never speaking, he dragged her about 30 feet from the
scene, Detective Bryant said. Then he slung her body over his shoulder
and carried her across the grassy median between Bladen Street and Rowe
Boulevard.

Crossing Rowe Boulevard, he dumped her on the grass behind low-hanging
tree branches and flagged down a passing vehicle.

It took six hours of surgery to repair her shattered vertebrae,
Detective Bryant said. She also suffered a broken collarbone and
finger, abrasions and a black eye.

She was released Sept. 15 from the Shock-Trauma Center at University
Hospital in Baltimore and is no longer staying in the area, police
said.

According to Mr. Lund’s mother, the Lunds had a loving relationship,
still holding hands after 11 years of dating and marriage.

The message on their anniversary cards this summer was identical:
“Thank you for the best six years of my life.”

With no children, the Lunds, who lived in Annapolis sporadically for
eight years, were apparently on a career track. Mr. Lund had just begun
student teaching in his final semester of college.

According to his mother, he never suffered mental problems, other than
worrying too much. His family calls him “Mr. Applesauce” for his
healthy lifestyle and eating habits, she said.

But Mr. Lund is dyslexic and has Attention Deficit Disorder, and in the
past few months his worries and stress over student teaching became
overwhelming, she said.

“He just panicked about going to the board, and the children being able
to spell better than he did,” Mrs. Lund said.

One morning he visited his mother in tears, and gave her his guns for
fear that he might kill himself.

After three weeks without sleeping and eating, Mr. Lund went to a
doctor who prescribed Zoloft — a drug with warnings of fatal reactions
and mental status changes. He was told to take it on a weekly basis.

Mrs. Lund believes her son was overcome by hallucinations on the
morning of the attack.

Mr. Lund was committed to Sheppard Pratt Health System in Baltimore
County following the offense after he told police he felt like hurting
himself, Detective Bryant said.

He told Detective Bryant he was “dazed” and has no memory of the
incident.

“All he remembers is driving down the road and carrying his wife to the
hospital,” Detective Bryant said. “I thought it was strange that he was
headed the wrong way.”

Mr. Lund had no history of violence, and his wife’s main concern was
that the arrest would tarnish his clean record, Detective Bryant said.

Annapolis Attorney Gill Cochran, who is tentatively representing Mr.
Lund, said he plans to seek detention for his client at a medical
facility such as Sheppard Pratt. He will eventually enter a plea of
“not criminally responsible,” he said.

“Psychological difficulties are clearly involved in this case,” he
said.
Copyright © 1999 The Capital, Annapolis, Md.