ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Patients Report 20 Times More Side Effects Than Doctors Report

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

In answer to the question asked in the title of this article,
“Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?,” I should remind you of the comment made by the psychiatric nurse who
attended one of my lectures a couple of years ago. After listening to me discuss
the potential side effects of SSRI antidepressants she stood and said, “Dr.
Tracy we never get to hear what you have shared with us here tonight, but I know
it is true because I am on Lexapro and have suffered nearly every one of the

side effects you mentioned. But you do not know what is going on out here. At
least 75% of the doctors and nurses I work with are on these drugs! The drug
reps are telling them they are in a stressful profession and will surely end up
suffering depression as a result so they need to get started on these drugs now
in order to help prevent that.”

Of course my first response was, “With these drugs affecting
the memory so strongly as to cause “amnesia” as a frequent side effect, if you
cannot even remember who you are, how do you remember what your patients
need?”
She admitted that they do not remember and have to constantly
remind one another and then they attribute it to old age setting
in.
So perhaps by the time these doctors get around to reporting
the patientsside effects they have forgotten what those side effects were that
they were to report. Of course these drugs also produce much more business
for the doctors by producing side effects and bringing patients back in for
follow up treatment so there is also a financial incentive to not report and
give the drugs a bad record. No matter the reason it is clear that the
situation is causing a very serious situation for patients and public safety in
general.
Paragraph three reads:  “The investigators followed 300
patients who were in ongoing outpatient treatment for depression
over six weeks. The authors compared what the patient reported on a
standardized scale of 31 different side effects (Toronto Side

Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating psychiatrist
on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect between
psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects
reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris.
When the investigators concentrated on
those side effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still

reported 2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/charting-the-depths/201004/why-dont-psychiatrists-notice-when-patients-experience-medication-si

Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?

If side effects fall in the forest, do they make a sound?

Published on April 20, 2010

A rich scientific study raises more

questions than it answers.

This point is exempified by new work conducted
at Rhode Island Hospital and published in the Journal of Clinical
Psychiatry
.

The investigators followed 300 patients who were in
ongoing outpatient treatment for depression over six weeks. The authors compared
what the patient reported on a standardized scale of 31 different side effects
(Toronto Side Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating
psychiatrist on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect
between psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects

reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris. When the investigators concentrated on those side
effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still reported
2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.

The authors summarize their provocative findings in mild
language, “The findings of the present study indicate that clinicians do not
record in their progress notes most side effects reported on a side effects

questionnaire by psychiatric
outpatients receiving ongoing pharmacological treatment for depression.”

Obviously
all is not well in the state of Demark. Although the findings concern the
treatment of depression, they raise broader questions about the doctor-patient
relationship.

Why is there such a massive disconnect between what
psychiatrists and patients report, on something so basic as whether prescribed
medications are having untoward effects? Do psychiatrists not ask enough
questions about side effects? Do psychiatrists not dig deep enough into

patients‘ responses? Are psychiatrists hearing what patients say, but not
documenting it in their notes? Or is the problem more on the patient side? Are
patients reluctant to speak candidly to their doctors about side effects (i.e.,
yes, I am having problems with sexual functioning)? Or do patients freeze up and
forget their experiences when asked in the heat of the moment (it is easier to
respond to a standardized list of side effects using pencil and paper)? Or is it
the situation that is to blame for this disconnect? Are patient-doctor
interactions in this day and age simply too rushed to insure efficient or
effective transfer of information?

Whatever the explanation,
psychiatrists appear to believe that patients are having fewer problems with
medications than they truly are. It is hard to see how psychiatrists can act in
the best interest of their patients if they do not know what their patients are
experiencing!!!!

The researchers recommend the use of a self-administered
patient questionnaire in clinical practice to improve the recognition of side

effects for patients in treatment. This study reveals a chasm of
misunderstanding between doctors and patients. This recommendation is a
sensible, but baby, step towards narrowing
it…

 1,565 total views,  1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT & PAIN MED: War Vet Kills Self In Front of VA Medical Center: OH

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: If this young man was wanting to make a statement by taking his life I cannot think of a better place to make such a statement than in front of the VA Medical Center! Why? Because they have been one of the very worst at pushing these kinds of meds. They hand them out like candy and have for decades! I am sure he was frustrated with the treatment he was getting from the VA as they continue to push these drugs as the only “answer” when they DO NOT WORK and only make the initial problem worse!

Paragraph five reads:  “Scott Labensky, whose son lived with Huff, agreed. He said the veteran was injured by a ground blast while serving inIraq and received ongoing treatment for a back injury and depression.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The most common treatment for depression is an antidepressant, usually a newer antidepressant such as SSRIs or SNRIs.  The suicide rate among soldiers is now higher than the combat deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan. The FDA Black Box warning for antidepressants and suicidality covers those aged 24 and under. The majority of the soldiers in Iraq/Afghan are 20 to 24 years of age.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/veteran-commits-suicide-infrontof-dayton-vacenter-656012.html

Did war vet kill self to make a statement?

Man had been in VA emergency room earlier in the morning.

By Lucas Sullivan and Margo Rutledge Kissell
Staff Writers Updated 11:23 PM Friday, April 16, 2010

DAYTON  Jesse Charles Huff walked up to the Veterans Affairs Department’s Medical Center on Friday morning wearing U.S. Army fatigues and battling pain from his Iraq war wounds and a recent bout with depression.

The 27-year-old Dayton man had entered the center’s emergency room about 1 a.m. Friday and requested some sort of treatment. But Huff did not get that treatment, police said, and about 5:45 a.m. he reappeared at the center’s entrance, put a military-style rifle to his head and twice pulled the trigger.

Huff fell near the foot of a Civil War statue, his blood covering portions ofthe front steps.

Police would not specify what treatment Huff sought and why he did not receive it. Medical Center spokeswoman Donna Simmons declined to answer questions about Huff’s treatment, citing privacy laws. But police believe Huff killed himself to make a statement.

Scott Labensky, whose son lived with Huff, agreed. He said the veteran was injured by a ground blast while serving in Iraq and received ongoing treatment for a back injury and depression.

“He never got adequate care from the VA he was trying to get,” Labensky said. “I believe he (killed himself) to bring attention to that fact. I saw him two days ago. He was really hurting.”

Simmons said Huff received care at the center since August 2008 and his care was being handled by a case manager.

The suicide rate among 18- to 29-year-old men who have left the military has gone up significantly, the government said in January.

The rate for those veterans rose 26 percent from 2005 to 2007, according to data released by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

The military community also has struggled with an increase in suicides, with the Army seeing a record number last year. Last May, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base focused on suicide recognition and prevention after four apparent suicides involving base personnel within six months.

Huff arrived early Friday in a cream-colored van police found parked about 200 yards from a south entrance of the medical center. The van contained some U.S. Army clothing, a carton of Newport cigarettes and a prescription bottle of Oxycodone with Huff’s name on the side.

Oxycodone is often used to treat severe pain.

As a precaution, bomb squad technicians blew apart a backpack Huff carried before committing suicide.

 2,286 total views,  1 views today

4/30/2001 – Brain Death in Carbon Dioxide Treatment for Depression

Every time I think it can’t get much worse, it does! And every time I think I
have finally heard it all, I hear something like this case reported in the NY
Post as brain dead from carbon dioxide treatment.

ANYONE should know that depriving the brain of oxygen kills brain cells. So,
why would one think, especially one who calls himself a doctor, that would be
beneficial to someone suffering emotional trauma of any kind to give them
carbon dioxide? Will we hear next that they will be holding patient’s heads
under water for 10 minutes to see of what benefit it might be?

Even more alarming is the fact that this man pawned himself off as one who
specializes in environmental medicine and homeopathy. You would think that
someone who is suppose to know anything about environmental medicine would be
well aware of the damage caused by carbon dioxide – one of the greatest
concerns of environmental medicine. And since when did homeopathy include
anything like treating someone with carbon dioxide? Perhaps the problem here
was that the good doc had spent too much time in the same room where he was
treating his patients with the carbon dioxide? 🙂

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org and author of
Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? ()

CIRCARE:
Citizens for Responsible Care & Research
A Human Rights Organization
Tel-212-595-8974 FAX: 212-595-9086
veracare@…

FYI
According to The NY Post, a licensed psychiatrist, James Watt, used carbon
dioxide as a “treatment” for depression. Result: patient is brain dead in a
coma at Bellevue Hospital.

Could it be that James Watt is related to the notorious neurosurgeon, James
Watt, who teamed up with neurologist Walter Freeman, performing 40,000
lobotomies (by 1955) on American men, women, and children ??
[see excerpt, below, from the book Medical Blunders, by Robert Youngson and
Ian Schott.]

The National Institutive of Mental Health sponsors Carbon dioxide
“challenge’ experiments that are being conducted on patients–including
adolescents–who have been diagnosed with panic disorder. Is it ethical to
induce panic attacks (with carbon dioxide or other such non-therapeutic,
dangerous procedures) in order to study panic disorder? Or, do these
experiments demonstrate current “medical blunders” ?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New York Post
Friday April 27, 2001, page 8

GEAR SEIZED FROM COMA WOMAN’S DOC

By MURRAY WEISS and DAVID K. LI

April 27, 2001 — Authorities seized equipment from the office of a
Manhattan psychiatrist yesterday – after one of his patients wound up brain
dead following a session, cops said.

Leah Grove, 38, is in intensive care at Bellevue Hospital, where she was
taken April 19 after something went wrong during “carbon dioxide” therapy at
Dr. James Watt’s office on East 46th Street.

Watt was treating the Queens woman for depression with a combination of
gases, including carbon dioxide, cops said.

Investigators said it was unlikely charges would filed.
_________________________________________________________________

New York Post
Sunday April 29, 2001

CO2-THERAPY VICTIM’S SHATTERED DREAMS

By DAVID K. LI, ANGELA C. ALLEN, MURRY WEISS and DAN MANGAN

April 28, 2001 — The woman left brain-dead after a psychiatric session
involving an unusual gas therapy had been looking forward to a new job in
California, her landlady said yesterday.

Leah Grove, 38, already had moved out of the Sunnyside, Queens,
apartment she had been sharing with a friend in anticipation of her move
west, said landlady Edith Giron.

Grove, a computer saleswoman, remained in a coma yesterday at Bellevue
Hospital with her grief-stricken mother at her bedside.

“Everything is about as can be expected,” said her mother, Lynn Grove,
who was so upset she could barely speak.

Grove was taken to the hospital April 19 after a mishap during
“carbon-dioxide therapy” at Dr. James Watt’s Manhattan office, police said.
She was being treated for stress and mild depression, cops said.

Watt has not been charged, but police and prosecutors searched his East
46th Street office and seized equipment Thursday.

Questions remained yesterday about the nature and purpose of the
therapy by Watt, who could not be reached for comment. Carbon dioxide can
suffocate a person.

Watt, 73, is a licensed psychiatrist whose business card says
he specializes in homeopathic care, including “environmental
detoxification, hormonal replacement, intravenous nutritional
infusions, and anti-aging therapy.”

Originally from New York, he spent time in California, and
returned to New York several years ago, police said.

In addition to carbon dioxide, police said Watt was giving a
mixture including oxygen and nitrous oxide – laughing gas – to Grove as
treatment.

Carbon-dioxide therapy was used in the 1940s and 1950s to
trigger near-death experiences.
_________________________________________________________________

http://www.scc.net/~lkcmn/lobotomy/lobo/brief.html

“the “Freeman-Watts standard lobotomy”; or, as they called it, the
“precision method”. After hand-drilling holes on either side of the head
which were widened by manually breaking away further bits of the skull, the
way would be paved for the knife by the preliminary insertion of a 6 inch
cannula, the tubing from a heavy-gauge hypodermic needle. Put in one hole,
this would be aimed at the other, on the opposite side of the head. Then the
blunt knife would be inserted in the path initially carved by the cannula.
Once inside the brain, the blade would be swung in two cutting arcs,
destroying the targeted nerve matter. “It goes through just like soft
butter,” said Watts. The operation was repeated on the other side of the
head.

Because the technique was “blind” — they could not see what they were
doing — it required both men. Watts manipulated the cannula and blade while
Freeman crouched in front of the patient, like a baseball catcher, using his
knowledge of the internal map of the brain to give Watts instructions such
as “up a bit”, “down a fraction”, or “straight ahead”. Watts enjoyed “flying
on instruments only”, as he put it, and became so expert that, as a special
trick, he could insert a cannula through a 2 millimeter hole in one side of
a patient’s head and thread it through the brain and out of the opposing
hole like a shoelace. “That’s pretty damn dramatic, you know,” he once said.
“And of course it always impressed spectators.”

The best was yet to come. Having observed that the optimum results were
achieved when the lobotomy induced drowsiness and disorientation, Freeman
and Watts decided to see if they could use this information to judge how an
operation was proceeding; they began to perform lobotomies under local
anesthetic. Now they could speak to the patient while cutting the lobe
connections and gauge whether they were being successful. They asked
patients to sing a song, or to perform arithmetic, and if they could see no
signs of disorientation, they chopped away some more until they could.

Initial professional reaction to the 1936 operations was not promising.
Although, privately, the technique aroused great interest, it drew outraged
responses from psychoanalysts and many psychiatrists, though, in keeping
with the medical tradition of discretion, these reservations were not voiced
to the public at the time. Ten years later, everybody would declare that
they had always opposed the lobotomy.” …………..

“As early as 1951, even the Soviet Union, where psychiatric abuse was rife,
had stopped performing the lobotomy on ideological grounds: it produced
unresponsive people who were fixed and unchangeable.”

~~~~~~~
The preceding text was adapted from the book Medical Blunders, by Robert
Youngson and Ian Schott. All reprinted materials are copyrighted by the
original authors; unauthorized reproduction is strictly prohibited. The
information presented at this site is intended for educational purposes
only, consult a professional for additional information. The maintainer of
this site and the original authors assume no responsibility of the misuse of
this information. Suggestions, comments, or questions should be sent to:
vestc@…. Last modification: 11 October 1997.

 1,932 total views,  1 views today