ANTIDEPRESSANT: Amnesia & Murder: Man Stabs Wife to Death: Nebraska

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side
effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect
for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.  It is no uncommon to be
unaware of what one has done on these drugs.
Also paranoia is listed as an “Infrequent” side-effect
[but not listed as Rare] in the Physicians Desk Reference for medications for
depression.  A person with paranoia should almost never be given an
antidepressant.
_____________________________
Paragraphs 12 through 16 read:  “The report says
Hollister began experiencing  ‘depressive symptoms,’ including
severe insomnia, in the summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a
relative’s purported involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the
report says.”

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom
he believed were ‘plotting’ against him
,” the report says.  ‘He also
experienced suicidal ideation during that time period’.”

“Hollister
sought help from several medical professionals and was
prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.”

“On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was
dead and a knife was beside her.”


http://www.omaha.com/article/20091031/NEWS01/710319900/-1/FRONTPAGE

Published Saturday October 31,
2009

Man competent for trial in wife’s death

By Todd Cooper
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

His mental
state now stabilized through medication, Robert T. Hollister has been ruled
competent to stand trial in the stabbing death of his wife, Jeanie “Ellie”
Hollister.

What doctors haven’t determined is whether the Omaha man was
sane at the time of his wife’s death on Nov. 3, 2008.

In a recent court
document, Lincoln Regional Center doctors said they needed more time to make
that determination. Hollister has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to

first-degree murder.

“Mr. Hollister is competent to stand trial,” the
regional center report says. “Further evaluation is necessary before an opinion
can be offered regarding Mr. Hollister’s mental status at the time of the
offense.”

Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine acknowledged the rarity of
regional center doctors requesting more time for evaluation because they haven’t
reached a consensus regarding a defendant’s mental state at the time of a
crime.

He said a defendant isn’t necessarily insane just because he has
been battling mental illness. However, he said, attorneys will have to wait for
the further evaluation before deciding how to proceed.

With insanity
defenses, the burden shifts to defense attorneys to prove that their client was
insane at the time of the killing. It will be up to Douglas County District
Judge Marlon Polk to weigh any testimony about Hollister’s mental
state.

If the judge concludes that Hollister was insane, he most likely
would be committed indefinitely to the regional center. If the judge determines
that Hollister was sane, he would proceed to trial and, if convicted, face life
in prison.

The initial regional center report by psychiatrist Klaus
Hartmann and psychologist Mario Scalora shows that Hollister, 59, had been
battling depression for several months before the death of his

wife.

Hollister, who has no criminal record, has a master’s degree in
human resources and was employed at Omaha Bedding Co. from 1994 to
2007.

He then worked at his wife’s vintage clothing store, “Weird Wild
Stuff,” from 2007 until the time of her death.

The report says Hollister
began experiencing “depressive symptoms,” including severe insomnia, in the
summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a relative’s purported
involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the report
says.

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom he
believed were ‘plotting’ against him,” the report says. “He also experienced
suicidal ideation during that time period.”

Hollister sought help from
several medical professionals and was prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.

On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was dead and a
knife was beside her.

Police found Ellie Hollister dead in the couple’s
home at 4705 N. 111th Circle.

Detectives found evidence that Ellie
Hollister, 52, tried to fight off her husband, including scratch marks on Robert
Hollister’s face. Hollister told regional center doctors he had “memory lapses
related to the alleged offense.”

“Hollister demonstrated a desire for
justice,” the report says, “rather than undeserved punishment.”

Contact
the writer:

444-1275,

todd.cooper@owh.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault of an officer: Australia

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: This sounds too familiar to the Donald Schell case in
Wyoming that went to trial after he took Paxil for two days and then shot
and killed his wife, daughter, infant granddaughter and himself. The jury
ruled in that case that the two antidepressants were the main cause of that
tragic murder/suicide.

Cases like this immediately make me wonder about the P450 2D6 liver enzyme
that is never tested for in patients before giving them an SSRI. There are
about 7 – 10% of the population who lack that liver enzyme because
genetically they did not inherit it. Without the enzyme you cannot metabolize an
antidepressant and you hit toxic levels rapidly.
____________________________________________________________

Paragraph four reads: "Lawyer Ian Pilgrim said that Warren intended to
plead guilty and had been under significant personal and financial stress. He
had started taking anti-depressants two days before the incident, Mr Pil
grim said."

_http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/07/22/assault-accused-giv
en-bail/_
(http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/07/22/assault-accused-given-bail/)

Assault accused given bail
22nd July 2009

©istockphoto/antb

A MAN who allegedly bashed a female police officer with a pick handle
after she went to his home to attend a domestic dispute was released on bail
yesterday.

Gregory Paul Warren, 38, was charged with assault occasioning bodily harm
while armed and serious assault after allegedly attacking two officers at
Urraween on Sunday afternoon.

He was subdued using capsicum spray.

Lawyer Ian Pilgrim said that Warren intended to plead guilty and had been
under significant personal and financial stress. He had started taking
anti-depressants two days before the incident, Mr Pilgrim said.

Prosecutor Sergeant Kathryn Stagoll opposed bail because of Warren’s
unpredictability and volatility. â

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