Superman Star Margot Kidder, Advocate for Natural Mental Health, Dead at 69

MY COMMENT ON THE ARTICLE CIRCULATING EVERYWHERE THIS MORNING ON THE DEATH OF MARGOT KIDDER…
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Margot did not become an advocate for mental health!!! She became an advocate for natural treatment of mental health issues after suffering a horrific manic episode in 1996!!! From then on she treated her Bipolar naturally after working with orthomolecular psychiatrist Dr. Abram Hoffer.
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Margot was scheduled to lecture at my alma matter, Eastern Arizona College, when she suffered the manic episode & disappeared in 1996. I was asked to take her place for that lecture since I am an expert on antidepressants, (we now have a Facebook group called
Antidepressant induced bipolar and schizophrenia Facebook group,), but out of respect for Margot the event was cancelled instead.
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“I certainly hope that after the passing of Dr. Hoffer several years ago that no one used the standard marketing ploy of talking her into using a “new improved version” of one of these deadly antidepressants – drugs notorious for producing multiple organ failure resulting in death as the serotonin levels go too high thus producing Serotonin Syndrome!”
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Quote from Abram Hoffer MD – “There’s this statement that if you treat someone who is sick [with drugs] you have two problems,” adds Dr. Hoffer, who is the author of several books and maintains a private consultancy in Victoria. “Treat the illness and then treat the results of the treatment.”  Original Article
-Ann Blake-Tracy
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MARGOT KIDDER‘SUPERMAN’ STAR DEAD AT 69

 5/14/2018 9:24 AM PDT

‘Superman’ Star Margot Kidder Dead at 69

EXCLUSIVE

Margot Kidder, the actress who played Lois Lane in “Superman,” died Sunday in Montana … TMZ has learned.

Margot was at her home when she passed away, according to the spokesperson at Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, MT. The cause of death is unknown at this point.

Bruce Becker, the Park County Attorney, tells TMZ … an unknown person called police to report Margot was unconscious and not breathing. Police responded and found her dead. The Livingston Police Chief says foul play is not considered a factor, but her death is now under investigation.  

Margot starred opposite Christopher Reeve in 1978’s “Superman,” and also in the 3 sequels. She continued acting right up until this year, taking small roles in TV shows and movies — but also had stage roles … including “The Vagina Monologues” on Broadway. She reportedly had 2 more roles yet to be released.

Margot had a very public battle with bipolar disorder for years. During her struggle she was briefly homeless in 1996. Margot became an advocate for mental health after that incident.

She’d been married 3 times, although she’d been single since the ’80s.

Margot is survived by a daughter.

RIP

 

‘I’ve had quite a few romances with really great men, more than most people perhaps, and I don’t miss them at all,” confesses Margot Kidder, punctuating her candour with an old-lady cackle. “I’m at a different phase of my life now.”

The Canadian-born actress who shot to fame in the late Seventies as Lois Lane in the Superman movie franchise has more than one saviour these days.

One is middle age, which serves as her cloak. Much of the glamorous thrice-married-and-divorced star, who counted Pierre Elliott Trudeau among her lovers, is hidden beneath a healthy weight gain, loose, comfortable clothes, a curtain of long auburn hair and large horn-rimmed glasses.

At 58, Ms. Kidder feels liberated from the expectations of others. “In middle age, you walk into a room and you don’t exist, and so you go, ‘Wait a minute. I had this identity as this hot young babe.’ You have to re-envision yourself, and I’ve loved it. You can be who you are and say what you think without thinking, ‘Is this going to make me less attractive as a female and am I batting my eyes enough at the guy?'”

The only man she occasionally turns to gaze at fondly is Abram Hoffer, president of the International Schizophrenia Foundation, who sits at the head of a small table in a downtown Toronto hotel where we meet.

He is her other saviour, a 90-year-old Superdoc in a crumpled tan suit, who has plucked patients from the grip of mental illnesses for over 40 years through the use of controversial orthomolecular psychiatry – a belief that the cure is in balancing or correcting a patient’s biochemistry.

By following his advice on supplementing her diet with a tailor-made regimen of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, enzymes, hormones and essential fatty acids – and no longer taking any pharmacological drugs – Ms. Kidder says she has freed herself of the manic depression she suffered all of her life and that caused her embarrassingly public meltdown in 1996.

Found on the streets of Los Angeles in a paranoid state, her hair hacked off and without her dental plate, Ms. Kidder, who had gone off her medication, became the poster girl for mental illness.

Shortly after, she visited her family in Vancouver and visited an acupuncturist who recommended she see Dr. Hoffer, an alternative-medicine pioneer who was born on a Saskatchewan farm in 1917 and likes to call his star patient Margie.

The two now keep in touch and regularly speak at conferences, including a recent one on nutritional medicine in Toronto, presented in part by the International Society for Orthomolecular Medicine.

Asked if she sees her infamous psychotic break as a good thing, Ms. Kidder answers initially with her cackling laugh, while Dr. Hoffer intones softly that “it was very good for the whole world.”

But there is little conversation that she shies away from and so, after a pause, Ms. Kidder leaps right in with her straightforward gaze, her hands on the table, palms face down and sliding back and forth across the smooth surface, as if she wants to brush away any crumb of misunderstanding.

“I had to look at the fact that I was an actress and you’re not allowed to get fat,” she says, leaning into the table. “I would go for one month on hard-boiled eggs and grapefruit and black coffee and then I’d have tequila and hot dogs for a week. There was no food in my brain, and thus it didn’t work.”

Fame was not to blame. “Whether I’d been working in a bank or working as an actress, it would have been the same experience. It’s my body.”

But some people find the manic phase of the illness highly creative. Did it ever help her in her work as an actress?

“I would say that an enormous number of people in the arts could be called bipolar,” she responds. “But these labels are very destructive. Human beings aren’t labels. They’re complex things of mind, body, soul.”

She and Dr. Hoffer then fly off together on a long digression about the malevolence of the medical establishment, talking more to each other than to me.

Ms. Kidder: “Doctors pathologize so many simply human feelings. Now, people in a state of grief automatically take an antidepressant.”

Dr. Hoffer: “When I started in psychiatry, there were 30 or 40 diagnostic terms. Now there are three or four hundred.”

I try to turn the conversation back to her.

“Why don’t you just listen to Dr. Hoffer?” she snaps with the annoyance of a schoolmarm.

They soar off again.

“The great tragedy of Dr. Hoffer’s work is that until the last few years, people turned to it not as the first line of defence, but when they were at the end of their rope,” Ms. Kidder puts in.

“There’s this statement that if you treat someone who is sick [with drugs] you have two problems,” adds Dr. Hoffer, who is the author of several books and maintains a private consultancy in Victoria. “Treat the illness and then treat the results of the treatment.”

“Nobody has ever died from taking too many vitamins,” Ms. Kidder coos as she peers fondly at her hero through her owlish glasses.

Turning to me, she instructs: “Nobody can make a lot of money off anyone getting well naturally, but they can make trillions of dollars getting well off synthetically made drugs.”

I am still wondering how her bouts of mania and depression affected her work.

“I am as good an actress sane as I was crazy, okay?” she says with a forced smile of perfect teeth.

Does she ever wonder if they affected her marriages?

“It’s hard to say,” she allows, relaxing a bit. “Generally, my experience is that you have long periods of being like anyone else and then you have episodes where you are a mess. So, I can’t say whether my first marriage [to writer/director Thomas McGuane, the father of her only child, Maggie]fell apart because of manic depression or if it fell apart because we were both too self-centred and egomaniacal to be able to compromise with each other,” she says, laughing at her assessment of herself.

Ms. Kidder luxuriates in the comfort of her middle-aged skin. A long-time resident of Livingston, Mont., she “gets paid enough from acting to make a living” and likes to spend time with her dog and two grandchildren who live nearby.

“I don’t think any of us who do this [orthomolecular treatment]are so silly as to assume that vitamins are going to cure you from life. You’re going to get some body blows that just happen,” she says as she turns to Dr. Hoffer, who smiles at her benevolently and nods his bald head in agreement. “That’s just called living,” she concludes calmly, still looking at him.

 

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CYMBALTA: Canadian Man in Bathrobe Kills One, Wounds One At Election Celebration

Richard Bain Arrest

“It’s totally different from my character. All my life I worked and helped other people.”

Please read at least this part of this article to see how this poor man became so manic on Cymbalta. Why did no one catch such blatantly obvious manic behavior, indicating a serious toxic reaction to this drug, BEFORE this fatal tragedy?!! If it was subtle hypomanic behavior that would be one thing but this is clearly extreme manic behavior with the wild spending, wild promiscuous behavior, cravings for alcohol, etc. For more information on this antidepressant side effect see my 2006 presentation to the FDA, my DVD “Bipolar, Are You Misdiagnosed Due to the Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant? and come to our Facebook group Antidepressant-Induced Bipolar and Schizophrenia:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/1605446559734283/

BLAMES ANTIDEPRESSANT CYMBALTA

“Richard Bain claimed that he was a responsible, hard-working, caring person but his character changed after taking the anti-depressant Cymbalta in 2009.

“He said he broke off a 20-year relationship with his girlfriend and began visiting strip bars every night, hiring prostitutes and quickly burning through an inheritance and savings of $900,000.

“He told the court he spent a lot of money on “limousines, the best of wine, champagne, strippers.”

“With Cymbalta, you don’t think correctly,” he testified later. “I had all the energy in the world. Things come to my mind and I do it. You don’t think things out. It makes you not responsible.”

“He said video footage of him at the shooting scene wearing a blue bathrobe and ski mask, yelling “The English are waking up,” as police led him away, was unrecognizable. “It’s totally different from my character. All my life I worked and helped other people,” he said. Asked what could explain the change, he said: “To me it was the medications.”

“Bain testified that he had no memory of opening fire outside the celebrations. As the defence opened at his trial for the first-degree murder of lighting technician Denis Blanchette and the attempted murder of stagehand David Courage….

“On Sept. 4, 2012, provincial election day, Bain testified that he drove to Montreal to visit his sister-in-law in hospital and he became upset because she was suffering while she waited for an operation. As he was leaving at around 6:30 p.m., he asked his brother where the Metropolis concert hall was, because he heard that the PQ election-night party would be there. He said he decided to take a look out of curiosity, and he drove by it in his GMC Yukon three times before leaving. That, he told the jury, is where his memory of the day ends. He said his sister-in-law’s suffering affected him deeply.

AN ADDITIONAL EIGHT PILLS CONSUMED BEFORE SHOOTING?!!!

“My depression that day came over me like a wave,” he testified. He said that in addition to his regular dose of one 60 mg Cymbalta capsule taken in the morning, he downed at least eight more after leaving the hospital.

“Shown video footage of his vehicle arriving behind the Metropolis shortly before midnight, of a figure leaving the vehicle and approaching the concert hall’s rear entrance and of his subsequent arrest as police pinned him to the ground, he said he had no memory of the events.”

This reminds me so much of one of the very first cases I worked on in the early 90’s. A teen in Florida living with a couple of friends had become depressed and knew that one of his friends had a bottle of Zoloft sitting on top of the fridge she had decided she did not want to take. He knew it was for depression so he took one to see if it would help. When he did not feel less depressed after 15 minutes he took another, and after 15 more minutes he took another.

After taking eight pills he has no memory of what happened. But the official police record shows that he met a homeless man and stabbed him 100 times with a screwdriver. Last I knew he was given a sentence of life in prison for murder.

It is just so sad that such dangerous drugs are prescribed so freely and with so little concern and are sitting around people’s homes where anyone has access to them with little to no warning of how deadly they can be!!!

A VIDEO OF MR. BAIN’S ARREST THAT FATEFUL NIGHT

TESTIMONIES BEFORE THE FDA DESCRIBE BAIN’S MANIC BEHAVIOR

If you watch the two following video presentations before the FDA you will hear that increasing serotonin has long been known to produce everything this man experienced.

FDA September 13, 2004:

http://www.drugawareness.org/fda-testimony/dr-ann-blake-tracys-september-13-2004-to-the-fda

FDA December 13, 2006:

http://www.drugawareness.org/fda-testimony/dr-ann-blake-tracys-december-13-2006-to-the-fda

And for thousands of other similar bizarre and violent tragedies documented to be linked to antidepressant drugs see our database of cases at www.SSRIStories.Net

READ MORE – ORIGINAL ARTICLE: http://www.montrealgazette.com/News/12066673/story.html

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness

DrugAwareness.org & SSRIstories.NET

Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here:http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships in the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan. For only a $30 membership for one month you can even get 30 days of access to the withdrawal CD with tips on rebuilding after the meds, all six of my DVDs, hundreds of radio interviews, lectures, TV interviews I have done over the years PLUS access to my book on antidepressants (500 plus pages) with more information than you will find anywhere else (that is only $5 more than the book alone would cost) at www.drugawareness.org. (Definitely the best option to save outrageous postage charges for those out of the country!)

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