ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Alcohol Cravings & Assault Lead to Fatal Heart Attack: TN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________________
Paragraphs five and six read:  “The official cause of
death for Oteri was listed as a heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist
inflicted by Fagan, and the publisher’s family members maintained
they did not want Fagan to be prosecuted.

Fagan, who
was high on antidepressants and tequila the night of the fight,

was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation
treatment center

.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.upi.com/Entertainment_News/Music/2009/10/25/Songwriter-Fagan-remembers-lost-friend/UPI-64901256488994/

Songwriter Fagan remembers lost friend

Published: Oct. 25, 2009 at 12:43 PM
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NASHVILLE, Oct. 25 (UPI) — U.S. country songwriter Rich
Fagan says he wants his life to honor his publisher-friend Tom Oteri who died of
a heart attack after Fagan cut him
with a knife.

The (Nashville) Tennessean reported Sunday while Fagan did
not face prosecution for Oteri’s death on April 26, 2008, the songwriter holds
himself responsible.

“Part of me died that night, too, but it wasn’t the
good part,” Fagan told The Tennessean during an interview in Nashville. “If I’m
here for a reason, it’s to carry on Tom’s legacy.”

Fagan has written a
string of top hits recorded by country music stars, including “Americana,”
“Sold (The Grundy County Auction Incident),” “Be My Baby Tonight” and “I Miss
You a Little.”

The official cause of death for Oteri was listed as a

heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist inflicted by Fagan, and the
publisher’s family members maintained they did not want Fagan to be
prosecuted.

Fagan, who was high on antidepressants and tequila the night
of the fight, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation treatment center.

“The last
drink I had was that evening,” Fagan told The Tennessean. “I haven’t had one
since, and haven’t had the obsession to have
one.”

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ZOLOFT & WELLBUTRIN: Teen Attempts Suicide: Louisiana

First two paragraphs read:  “Now drug-free, J.K., a
Narconon Louisiana drug rehabilitation treatment graduate, tells the story of
how his addiction started and how it ended. J.K. spent his adolescent years
under the care of a psychiatrist. He started seeing the doctor when he was
12 or 13 up until the time he was 19 years old. Ten to
fifteen minutes into his first visit
he was diagnosed with bipolar
disorder, anxiety and unstable emotions. He was given Zoloft,
Atavan, and Klonopin as treatment.”

“Not only were J.K.’s
symptoms not helped by the drugs, but because of the side
effects of the Zoloft
he began experiencing suicidal
thoughts.
Due to these side effects his medication was switched to

Welbutrin, which not only increased his suicidal thoughts, but
caused him to overdose on his medications in what would be his
first suicide attempt. The FDA has since placed a black box warning on antidepressants warning of
this occurrence in adolescents and young adults.”

http://www.prleap.com/pr/142396/

Narconon Louisiana drug rehab graduate traces roots of addiction back to
psychiatric medications

DENHAM
SPRINGS, LOUISIANA
October 20, 2009 Health News

(PRLEAP.COM) Now drug-free, J.K., a Narconon
Louisiana drug rehabilitation treatment graduate, tells the story of how his
addiction started and how it ended. J.K. spent his adolescent years under the
care of a psychiatrist. He started seeing the doctor when he was 12 or 13 up
until the time he was 19 years old. Ten to fifteen minutes into his first visit
he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, anxiety and unstable emotions. He was
given Zoloft, Atavan, and Klonopin as treatment.

Not only were J.K.’s
symptoms not helped by the drugs, but because of the side effects of the Zoloft
he began experiencing suicidal thoughts. Due to these side effects his
medication was switched to Welbutrin, which not only increased his suicidal
thoughts, but caused him to overdose on his medications in what would be his
first suicide attempt. The FDA has since placed a black
box warning on antidepressants
warning of this occurrence in adolescents and
young adults.

In a recent interview J.K. explains that because of what he
had been told by his psychiatrist, he began to think that everything he was
thinking or feeling could be controlled by some kind of pill or
substance.

“Most times, these substances could be found in my own home,
inside little orange prescription bottles,” he explains, “[But then] I began
developing addictive personality traits by turning to street drugs, like
marijuana, cocaine, and pain killers to numb my emotions. Why? Because,
essentially, I had been told that having emotions is a disease that requires
treatment, or ‘management’.”

Once J.K. became addicted to street drugs as
well as his prescriptions, his problems continued to escalate. Luckily, before
he lost his life to drugs he found a rehabilitation facility with a totally drug-free
method
called Narconon Riverbend; located in Denham Springs,

Louisiana.

During his treatment he had to come to terms with his past
problems as well as the road that his psychiatric therapy led him
down.

“I had let drugs take over my life to such a huge extent that I was
no longer able to take care of myself or those around me,” he says. “I regret
that I have been lied to by a multi-billion dollar Psychiatric industry. I
regret that I tried to end my own life twice. I’m angry that these events were
the ‘side-effects’ of psychotropic medication. I especially regret the effect
that these events had on my family.”

No longer holding on to regret, J.K.
has now successfully overcome his prescription and street drug addiction and is
happily living life 100% drug-free. Today he is in control of his life – not a
psychiatrist, not street drugs or prescriptions.

J.K. does warn doctors
in the type of medications they prescribe, saying; “Next time you hand out a
prescription for the latest fad in psych meds, remember that your signature
could be the worst thing that ever happened to your ‘patient’”.

The
Narconon program specializes in getting people off all drugs and has helped
thousands become free from medications. If you or someone you know is addicted
to street drugs or prescriptions and is looking for a way to successfully get
off drugs permanently contact Narconon Louisiana today at
866-422-4650.

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