ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Doctor Murders his 9 Year Old Son: Oklahoma

Last thee paragraphs read:  “He wrote he continued
psychotherapy until his graduation from medical school in June 1988.”

“He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized again for three days
in 1995 for acute depression.”

” ‘I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,’  Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. ‘I returned to work after my hospitalization on
adjusted dosages of
antidepressants
‘.”

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Wolf was seeing
a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication,

The Oklahoman has learned. His mental issues
date back to his first year of medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized
for major depression, his medical records show.”

http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten

Affidavit, calls detail brutal death of Nichols Hills boy, 9
Doctor,
arrested in son’s stabbing, battled mental problems, records show

BY NOLAN CLAY
Published: November 18,
2009

NICHOLS
HILLS
­ A doctor who has battled mental issues for years said his son

was the devil as he stabbed the boy to death Monday morning at their home,
according to a police affidavit and a 911 recording.
[]
Stephen
Paul Wolf The 51-yearold is being held in the Oklahoma County jail on a murder
complaint.

What the affidavit states …
Here is a description
from a police affidavit of events Monday morning when police officer Michael
Puckett arrived at Dr. Stephen P. Wolf’s Nichols Hills home:

The officer
was dispatched at 3:52 a.m. Monday to the house of a neighbor who called police
after Mary Wolf banged on the neighbor’s front door. The officer heard screaming
from Wolf’s house and met Mary Wolf at the open front door. She told the
officer, “He’s killing my son. He’s killing my son.”

The officer drew

his gun and went through the house, finding the doctor on his knees “wrestling
with something up against a cabinet door and a dishwasher.”

The officer
ordered Wolf to put his hands up. “At that time Mr. Wolf raised his hands to
about head level and looked back at Officer Puckett and said, ‘He’s got the
devil in him and you know it’ several times.”

The officer ordered Wolf,
who was covered in blood, to get on his stomach. Wolf complied. The officer then
saw the victim, Tommy, with a knife in his head and a knife in his chest.

“Mr. Wolf again started saying, ‘You know he’s got the devil in him’
several times over.”

The boy then began to convulse and “Mr. Wolf leapt
up off the floor and said, ‘He’s not dead’ and tried (to) grab a knife from the
body to continue the assault.” The police officer pulled Wolf by the neck and
shirt and Wolf fell and dropped a knife.

The officer kicked Wolf in the
head as Wolf tried to reach for the knife and punched him in the jaw when Wolf
tried to reach for the knife again. The officer then was able to toss the knife
away.

Another officer arrived and handcuffed the doctor.

Slain boy remembered
Tommy Wolf, 9, was remembered Tuesday as
a sweet boy.

“He was always creative and feisty,” said Kristin Moyer,
26, of Oklahoma City, who was a counselor at an after-school program at Casady
School when Tommy was a student in 2006.

“He was a little feisty kid,
but he wasn’t bad. Just a typical boy. He loved having fun with the rest of his

friends,” she said.

“He was a real sweet kid. He did have his share of
timeouts, just like the rest of them. But I really enjoyed him.”

Others
who knew the boy made similar comments online at NewsOK.com.

“I knew
Tommy through Cub Scouts,” wrote Cheldrea Mollett of Oklahoma City. “He was a
lovely, sweet and wonderful boy. God has him now, and he is at peace.”

NewsOK Related Articles

Stephen
Paul Wolf
, 51, is in the Oklahoma
County
jail on a murder complaint. His son, Tommy, was 9.

Wolf was
seeing a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication, The
Oklahoman
has learned. His mental issues date back to his first year of
medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized for major depression, his

medical records show.

He repeatedly told the police officer who broke up
the attack on his son, “He’s got the devil in him and you know it,” according to
the police arrest affidavit.

His wife, Mary
Wolf
, was making a 911 call during the attack. Police officer Michael
Puckett
can be heard on the recording telling the doctor, “Put your hands
behind your ——- back now!”

The doctor can be heard saying, “Mary,
he’s the devil.” Mary Wolf replies, “He’s not the devil.” She then says,
“Tommy.”

The doctor tried to stab his son again when the boy began
convulsing, even though the officer had his gun drawn, police reported. The
officer pulled the doctor away and then had to kick and strike the doctor in the
head to keep the doctor from getting a knife again.

The doctor attacked

his son in the kitchen of their $500,000 house at 1715 Elmhurst Ave., police
reported.

Wolf ­ covered in blood ­ was on top of his son when
the officer arrived shortly before 4 a.m. Monday, police reported. The victim
had “a knife lodged in the left upper section of his head and a knife stuck in
the upper right part of the chest,” police reported. The boy died at the home.
Mary Wolf was treated for cuts on her hands and face.

A neighbor, Douglas
Woodson
, told police the doctor “was under review at his hospital for anger
issues,” police reported in the affidavit. The neighbor also told police the

doctor “was supposed to go to a rehab facility for the anger plus drug and
alcohol abuse.”

Tommy was in the third grade at Christ the King
Catholic School
. His funeral is tentatively planned for Friday.

History of depression
The doctor specialized in internal medicine. St.
Anthony Hospital
said arrangements have been made with other doctors to
provide medical care to his patients.

The doctor’s attorney, Mack
Martin
, declined comment.

The doctor in 1991 told the medical
licensure board that he began psychotherapy when he was hospitalized for
depression during his first year of medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
. He said he took a year off from medical school.

“Through continuing psychotherapy unresolved conflicts from my early
childhood and adolescence were discovered,” he wrote in 1991. “I grieved for my
father for the first time. He died in an airplane crash three weeks before my
third birthday in 1961. I experienced the pain and loss of failed relationships
in high school. I felt anger toward my mother and stepfather because of problems
in our relationship.”

He wrote he continued psychotherapy until his
graduation from medical school in June 1988.

He told the board in 1996
that he was hospitalized again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a result of all of the stress in my busy practice of
internal medicine and all the demands in making the final arrangements for my
marriage,” Wolf wrote in a letter to the board. “I returned to work after my
hospitalization on adjusted dosages of antidepressants.”

Read more:
http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten#ixzz0XEj9aNVs

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PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

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PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

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