ANTIDEPRESSANT, COCAINE, DEPAKOTE: Man Kills Mother, 2 Small Children, & Dog

On the morning of May 12, 2008,
Covington was admitted to University Community Hospital for a drug overdose. Tests showed he
had taken cocaine, acetaminophen and salicylate, another anti-inflammatory drug
used for mild to moderate pain, the defense filing states. Doctors also found
tricyclics, which is an antidepressant, and valproic acid, a drug used for
seizures and migraines.

The defense says a psychiatrist who
examined Covington for the case will testify that Covington’s bipolar disorder,
combined with the drugs in his system, rendered him mentally incapable of
forming the intent to commit first-degree murder.

Mental health defense pursued

By ELAINE
SILVESTRINI

esilvestrini@tampatrib.com

Published: February 2, 2010

TAMPA – A man charged with killing
and mutilating his girlfriend and her two children should not face the death
penalty because he was mentally incapable of intending to commit first-degree
murder, his attorneys say.

Lisa Freiberg and her children,
Heather Savannah, 2, and Zachary, 7, were found slain inside their Lutz mobile
home in 2008. The
family dog was also killed.

The deaths were so grisly that
investigators could not identify the bodies by looking at them.

Authorities say Edward Covington was
found huddled in a closet in the mobile home with blood on his hands, feet and
back.

The killings took place between 6
and 11 a.m. May 11, 2008, and it appeared Covington had stayed in the home
overnight, investigators say. He told detectives he killed Freiberg and her
children, according to court records.

Covington’s public
defenders
are asking a judge to allow them to
present evidence at trial about his mental condition at the time of the killings
and his mental health history, which they say dates to when he was
15.

A defense court filing says
Covington, 37, does not intend to use an insanity defense, which would be aimed
at seeking a verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity. Rather, the defense
hopes to persuade jurors to convict Covington of the lesser offense of
second-degree murder, making him ineligible for the death penalty.

Covington, his attorneys say, has
been diagnosed with bipolar disorder; a therapist who examined Covington in
2005, when he was working as a state corrections officer, described “classic
symptoms of rage and anger, and episodes of severe depression.”

On the morning of May 12, 2008,
Covington was admitted to
University Community Hospital for a drug overdose. Tests showed he
had taken cocaine, acetaminophen and salicylate, another anti-inflammatory drug
used for mild to moderate pain, the defense filing states. Doctors also found
tricyclics, which is an antidepressant, and valproic acid, a drug used for
seizures and migraines.

The defense says a psychiatrist who
examined Covington for the case will testify that Covington’s bipolar disorder,
combined with the drugs in his system, rendered him mentally incapable of
forming the intent to commit first-degree murder.

The charges against Covington
include three counts of first-degree murder, three counts of abuse of a dead
human body and one count of felony animal cruelty. Prosecutors are seeking the
death penalty.

Covington is being held without
bail.

According to the defense filing,
Covington tried to shoot himself in the head and was hospitalized under the
state’s Baker Act when he was 16. The next year, he overdosed on
drugs

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CELEXA & EFFEXOR: Suicide: 40 Year Old Woman: New York

Paragraphs three and four read:  “The results of an autopsy and toxicological examination have determined the cause of death to be from respiratory suppression with pulmonary edema, secondary to a drug overdose, a release from the state police says.”

“The drugs present that caused the overdose were determined to be Celexa and Effexor, medications prescribed for depression and anxiety, the release adds. Alcohol was also present.”

http://www.stargazette.com/article/20090826/NEWS01/908260338/Hatch+death+ruled+a+suicide

Hatch death ruled a suicide

August 26, 2009

After a 10-month investigation, the death of Kimberly R. Hatch has been ruled to be a suicide.Advertisement

The 40-year-old woman was found dead in her house at 704 Shady Drive, Endwell on Oct. 11 of last year after troopers responded to a 911 call.

The results of an autopsy and toxicological examination have determined the cause of death to be from respiratory suppression with pulmonary edema, secondary to a drug overdose, a release from the state police says.

The drugs present that caused the overdose were determined to be Celexa and Effexor, medications prescribed for depression and anxiety, the release adds. Alcohol was also present.

Dr. James Hayes, the coroner in the case, has ruled the death to be a suicide, said Cpt. James E. Barnes, of the state police.

Hayes said the investigation took 10 months because police had to consider all aspects in the case, consult with the district attorney and coroner’s offices and brief the family on the developments.

The case is now closed, the release says

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EFFEXOR: Death/Possible Suicide: England

Paragraph four reads:  “Post-mortem tests showed the 44-year-old had three times the fatal dose of the anti-depressant venlafaxine [Effexor] in her body.”

Fourth paragraph from the end reads:  “Mr Williams recorded an open verdict.”

Mr Bray said before her death she seemed “happy as a lord”, even though she had been threatened with eviction from her home.

Family and friends said they could not imagine Miss Jeynes taking an overdose to kill herself, although confirmed she had taken overdoses before.

Coroner quizzes boyfriend in overdose inquest

10:17am Friday 7th August 2009

THE boyfriend of a Malvern woman who died of a drug overdose was asked by a coroner if he had pushed the pills down her throat himself.

Elizabeth Jeynes was found in bed by her boyfriend with her eyes “rolling”, an inquest was told.

She was pronounced dead on arrival at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, Worcester, at about 2pm on Thursday, March 26, after ambulance crews had battled to resuscitate her.

Post-mortem tests showed the 44-year-old had three times the fatal dose of the anti-depressant venlafaxine in her body.

Her boyfriend George Bray said he received a call from Miss Jeynes at 1.30am on the day of her death saying that she was bored.

Mr Bray and friend Alan Cooper went to her home in Langland Avenue, Malvern, and took her back to Mr Cooper’s flat where she was put to bed because they believed she was drunk.

Mr Bray said he had not seen the mother-of-three take any pills or alcohol, although he said he could smell drink on her and that she was “stumbling all over the place”.

When Mr Bray got up at 7am, he noticed something was wrong.

“All I could see was just her eyes rolling and that’s when I called the ambulance,” said Mr Bray.

“I tried to talk to her and put a bit of water on her face.”

Mr Bray said before her death she seemed “happy as a lord”, even though she had been threatened with eviction from her home.

Family and friends said they could not imagine Miss Jeynes taking an overdose to kill herself, although confirmed she had taken overdoses before.

Worcestershire coroner Geraint Williams asked Mr Bray: “Did you hold her down and force tablets down her throat? Did you spike her drink with tablets and force it down her secretly?”

Mr Bray answered “no” to both questions.

Mr Williams told family and friends: “You may think this man has murdered Miss Jeynes, that he’s a liar but I can only go on the evidence. I have no evidence to suggest he’s not telling me the truth.”

Mr Cooper was warned he risked facing a criminal charge of perjury after he gave inconsistent answers about how long he had known Miss Jeynes, the time they arrived at her flat and when the ambulance was called.

Mr Williams said Mr Bray was “unconvincing” and that Mr Cooper was “unreliable” and “evasive”.

“I find both of those witnesses to be unsatisfactory and in some regards, dishonest,” he said.

Mr Williams said if Mr Bray had called an ambulance at about 7am and Miss Jeynes was pronounced dead at 2pm, crews must have been working to revive her for four to five hours inside the flat which was “inconceivable”.

But Mr Williams said he was satisfied that Miss Jeynes took the overdose voluntarily and that the postmortem examination showed no physical injuries to suggest she had been held down.

Mr Williams recorded an open verdict.

After the inquest Miss Jeynes’ daughter Katie said: “My mum was a kind person who would help anyone. She can rest in peace now.”

Miss Jeynes’ mother Hannah Passey said: “I lost my son Kenneth Passey more than 20 years ago in a car crash. Now I have lost my daughter.”

Her best friend, Margaret Ives, of Marsh Close, Malvern, said: “That woman had a heart of gold. She was a goodt-hearted lady.”

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