ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Attacks Prime Minister of Italy

Paragraph one reads:  “The electronics engineer who
attacked Silvio Berlusconi at a rally in Milan on Sunday
believed that
the Prime Minister was ruining Italy.”

Paragraph six reads:  “Mr
Tartaglia’s father said that his son was having psychiatric treatment
and on antidepressants at the time of
the attack
.  Mr Tartaglia sent a letter to Mr Berlusconi
apologising for his  ‘superficial, cowardly and thoughtless
action’.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article6958069.ece

Silvio Berlusconi is ruining Italy, Massimo Tartaglia felt before
attack

Massimo Tartaglia has support on Facebook after his
attack
Richard Owen in Rome

The electronics engineer who attacked
Silvio Berlusconi at a rally in Milan on Sunday believed that the Prime Minister
was ruining Italy.

Massimo Tartaglia, 42, who has been kept in isolation
after throwing a marble and metal souvenir into Mr Berlusconi’s face, told
police that he hated the Prime Minister because “that man is ruining Italy. I
don’t agree with anything he says”.

He told police that he had decided to
leave the cathedral square “but I heard people shouting, so I went back again. I
turned into a narrow side street, I turned round and I saw him just a few steps
away from me. He was coming through the barriers. I had a rush of blood to the
head. At that point I just wanted to hit him with all my strength. I wanted to
make my protest too”.

He added: “I did it all by myself. I am no one’s
hitman.”

Doctors said that Mr Berlusconi, 73, would spend a third night
in hospital. He lost nearly a pint of blood when his nose was broken. Two teeth
were also damaged and he suffered cuts. His treatment is expected to last at
least 25 days and he has been told to rest for two weeks. His doctor said that
he would not be left with scars.

Mr Tartaglia’s father said that his son
was having psychiatric treatment and on antidepressants at the time of the
attack. Mr Tartaglia sent a letter to Mr Berlusconi apologising for his
“superficial, cowardly and thoughtless action”.

He was not a member of a
political party but had told friends and customers in a bar that he could not
stand Mr Berlusconi. He bought the model of Milan’s cathedral, which he threw at
Mr Berlusconi, from a souvenir stall. Stallholders in the city said that model
replicas of the Duomo di Milano, like the one used in the attack, were selling
faster than normal.

Mr Tartaglia faces five years in jail or in a
psychiatric ward if convicted of assaulting a public official. Former teachers
described him as good at computers but said that he had begun to suffer an
identity crisis in his final year at school. He enrolled at the Milan
polytechnic but left after a few months and joined his father’s
company.

In 1995 he was interviewed by national newspapers after
inventing Music Pictures, a game in which images change colour in
response to different music.

Daniela Insalaco, Mr Tartaglia’s lawyer,
told reporters outside San Vittore prison in Milan that she was awaiting a
ruling on whether Mr Tartaglia should be sent to a psychiatric
unit.

Roberto Maroni, the Italian Interior Minister, told parliament that
police believed the attack was premeditated. When asked about reports that
police had been warned that Mr Tartaglia was behaving strangely before the
attack, he said that members of the public had “simply indicated to the police
that there was a mad person disturbing passers-by”.

He said that Mr
Tartaglia had been in the Piazza Duomo since 11am ­ hours before Mr
Berlusconi arrived. Despite Mr Tartaglia’s assertion that he acted alone ­ a
claim supported by the Prime Minister’s office ­ the newspaper Il
Giornale
said that the attack was part of a conspiracy.

Investigators
are due to question Andrea Di Sorte, the youth co-ordinator for Mr Berlusconi’s
party, after he told an Italian news agency that he thought that someone behind
Mr Tartaglia passed him the souvenir.

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AMITRIPTYLINE: Murder: Mother Kills Baby: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Keep in mind that the tricyclic antidepressants, like Amitriptyline, (the cause
of this child’s death) Imipramine, etc. have been given to small children for
decades now for bed wetting!

These tricyclic antidepressants have an almost identical
effect in increasing serotonin levels. When you interfere with the metabolism of
serotonin you increase the level of serotonin because it then begins to back up
causing serotonin levels to rise. (See the chapter “Serotonin Doubletalk” in the
book “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” to learn the
amazing deception behind the serotonin reuptake theory.
)
In fact Amitriptyline interferes with the
metabolism of serotonin at anywhere from 21% – 37% depending on the study
you refer to. In comparison one of the newest and most powerful SSRI
antidepressants, Celexa, interferes with serotonin metabolism at the
rate of 29%. They are very similar in this respect.
When serotonin metabolism is interfered with, thus producing
increases in serotonin levels, many adverse reactions can occur. As you keep in
mind that the main function of serotonin is constriction of smooth muscle
tissue, such as the bronchial tubes, all the major organs of the body, you can
quickly understand why this little child could no longer breathe. High levels of
Amitriptyline would have interfered with the metabolism of serotonin to the
extent as to shut the lungs down due to the high levels of serotonin
backing up in his system. The condition is known medically as Serotonin
Syndrome. And as you see from this case, Serotonin Syndrome can be
fatal.
Paragraph two reads:  “Laura-Jane Vestuto, 28, crushed
anti-depressant
pills prescribed to her

and
fed them to toddler Renzo.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/crime/article6825876.ece

From Times Online
September 8, 2009

Mother jailed for killing baby with antidepressants

Times Online

A mother was jailed for six years today
for killing her 20-month-old son by doping him to make him sleep.

Laura-Jane Vestuto, 28, crushed anti-depressant pills prescribed to her
and fed them to toddler Renzo.

She had been giving the medication to
Renzo for weeks before he developed breathing problems and died after being
taken to hospital in September 2007.

Tests showed the drug had built up
in his body and he had ten times the safe adult dose in his system, the Old
Bailey heard.

Traces of Amitriptyline were found on baby medicine
feeders but police believe he may have also been given the drug in his juice or
milk.

Judge Peter Thornton told Vestuto she had given Renzo sedatives to
make life easier for herself.

He said: “Instead of bearing the everyday
responsibility of being a parent, caring and loving for your son, you embarked
on a deliberate course of administering adult drugs, knowing that was wrong and
risky.

“You gave him drugs for purely selfish, self-centred reasons,
thinking only of yourself.”

The judge said Vestuto had been prescribed
the drug seven times in the months leading up to the boy’s death, but was not
taking it herself when Renzo died.

Traces of other drugs, including
painkillers, were also found in his system.

Judge Thornton added: “You
repeatedly administered these drugs, calmly and deliberately, knowing it was
wrong and not the way to care for children.”

He said Vestuto had shown
little emotion when her son died after being taken to hospital.

She had
compounded the suffering of her mother and former husband by denying given Renzo
the medication – and trying to throw the blame on them.

Sarah
Whitehouse, prosecuting, said Vestuto had been prescribed the drug for backache
and to make her sleep.

She told a neighbour that Renzo had been given
medicine by her GP to make him sleep while he was teething – but the doctor said
he was never consulted about teething problems.

Miss Whitehouse said it
was not possible to say how long Vestuto had been giving the drug to the boy.

Isabella Forshall, defending, said Vestuto had not intended to harm the
boy.

Miss Forshall said: “She meant it to help Renzo. There were a
number of small doses which suddenly overwhelmed poor Renzo.

“All she
wanted to be was a mum and housewife. Renzo was well-nourished and looked after.

“Like any parent, she was distressed when he was teething and miserable,
and that is why she took the step she did – a desperately reckless one.”

Vestuto, of Clapton, east London, pleaded guilty in July to causing or
allowing Renzo’s death.

An alternative charge of manslaughter was left
to lie on file after she pleaded not guilty.

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