ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Jumps From Brooklyner: First Suicide Ever in Bldg…

Paragraph five reads: “Diaz added that Paek reportedly suffered from clinical depression, and that she was on medication.”

http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/33/16/33_16_sb_brooklyner_suicide.html?comm=1

First suicide at Brooklyn’s tallest building

By Stephen Brown
The Brooklyn Paper

A woman jumped to her death from roof of the Brooklyner the borough’s tallest building last week, police said.

Thirty-year-old Jennifer Paek plummeted from the roof of the 51-story building on Lawrence Street between Willoughby Street and Myrtle Avenue in Downtown and landed on the seventh-floor terrace of the Metrotech office building next door at around 12:55 pm.

She was dead on the spot.

NYPD spokeswoman Mindy Diaz said that the dead woman lived on the 18th floor of the distinctive tower with her husband and had left suicide notes in their apartment.

Diaz added that Paek reportedly suffered from clinical depression, and that she was on medication.

The tragic suicide is likely the first of its kind for the Brooklyner, which opened early this year.

©2010 Community Newspaper Group

598 total views, no views today

ZOLOFT & WELLBUTRIN: Teen Attempts Suicide: Louisiana

First two paragraphs read:  “Now drug-free, J.K., a
Narconon Louisiana drug rehabilitation treatment graduate, tells the story of
how his addiction started and how it ended. J.K. spent his adolescent years
under the care of a psychiatrist. He started seeing the doctor when he was
12 or 13 up until the time he was 19 years old. Ten to
fifteen minutes into his first visit
he was diagnosed with bipolar
disorder, anxiety and unstable emotions. He was given Zoloft,
Atavan, and Klonopin as treatment.”

“Not only were J.K.’s
symptoms not helped by the drugs, but because of the side
effects of the Zoloft
he began experiencing suicidal
thoughts.
Due to these side effects his medication was switched to

Welbutrin, which not only increased his suicidal thoughts, but
caused him to overdose on his medications in what would be his
first suicide attempt. The FDA has since placed a black box warning on antidepressants warning of
this occurrence in adolescents and young adults.”

http://www.prleap.com/pr/142396/

Narconon Louisiana drug rehab graduate traces roots of addiction back to
psychiatric medications

DENHAM
SPRINGS, LOUISIANA
October 20, 2009 Health News

(PRLEAP.COM) Now drug-free, J.K., a Narconon
Louisiana drug rehabilitation treatment graduate, tells the story of how his
addiction started and how it ended. J.K. spent his adolescent years under the
care of a psychiatrist. He started seeing the doctor when he was 12 or 13 up
until the time he was 19 years old. Ten to fifteen minutes into his first visit
he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, anxiety and unstable emotions. He was
given Zoloft, Atavan, and Klonopin as treatment.

Not only were J.K.’s
symptoms not helped by the drugs, but because of the side effects of the Zoloft
he began experiencing suicidal thoughts. Due to these side effects his
medication was switched to Welbutrin, which not only increased his suicidal
thoughts, but caused him to overdose on his medications in what would be his
first suicide attempt. The FDA has since placed a black
box warning on antidepressants
warning of this occurrence in adolescents and
young adults.

In a recent interview J.K. explains that because of what he
had been told by his psychiatrist, he began to think that everything he was
thinking or feeling could be controlled by some kind of pill or
substance.

“Most times, these substances could be found in my own home,
inside little orange prescription bottles,” he explains, “[But then] I began
developing addictive personality traits by turning to street drugs, like
marijuana, cocaine, and pain killers to numb my emotions. Why? Because,
essentially, I had been told that having emotions is a disease that requires
treatment, or ‘management’.”

Once J.K. became addicted to street drugs as
well as his prescriptions, his problems continued to escalate. Luckily, before
he lost his life to drugs he found a rehabilitation facility with a totally drug-free
method
called Narconon Riverbend; located in Denham Springs,

Louisiana.

During his treatment he had to come to terms with his past
problems as well as the road that his psychiatric therapy led him
down.

“I had let drugs take over my life to such a huge extent that I was
no longer able to take care of myself or those around me,” he says. “I regret
that I have been lied to by a multi-billion dollar Psychiatric industry. I
regret that I tried to end my own life twice. I’m angry that these events were
the ‘side-effects’ of psychotropic medication. I especially regret the effect
that these events had on my family.”

No longer holding on to regret, J.K.
has now successfully overcome his prescription and street drug addiction and is
happily living life 100% drug-free. Today he is in control of his life – not a
psychiatrist, not street drugs or prescriptions.

J.K. does warn doctors
in the type of medications they prescribe, saying; “Next time you hand out a
prescription for the latest fad in psych meds, remember that your signature
could be the worst thing that ever happened to your ‘patient’”.

The
Narconon program specializes in getting people off all drugs and has helped
thousands become free from medications. If you or someone you know is addicted
to street drugs or prescriptions and is looking for a way to successfully get
off drugs permanently contact Narconon Louisiana today at
866-422-4650.

473 total views, no views today

Zoloft Suicide Attempts and Still Rebuilding My Life

“I will never trust such a self-serving inhumane profession as psychiatry.”

 

Dear Ann Blake-Tracy,

This is my story…if you decide to publish it online or anywhere else, please keep my e-mail, name and ID confidential. I am filing a complaint against my doctor with the state regulatory board and hope someday to find some closure on what was absolutely the most traumatic, horrific experience of my life. Thanks for reading!

First, I should tell you about myself before Zoloft. I have always enjoyed working and being around people. My favorite things are having dinner parties, going to art shows and theatre events. I have never collected unemployment or accepted any type of handout in my life and I take a great deal of pride in both my self-sufficiency and sociability. When I experienced some depression in my late 20’s it confused me. I felt like I wasn’t myself and didn’t really know what to do. So after trying everything from exercise, acupuncture, St. John’s and so forth, I did, for the first time in my 28-year old life, what I thought was the responsible thing to do: I sought “help”.

After six months of psychotherapy, the therapist told me my problem felt “organic” to her meaning not related to psychological problems. I was subsequently referred to a psychiatrist who prescribed ativan and told me I might be unipolar depressive, dysthymic, or possibly bipolar. Actively suicidal after considering what the effect of this diagnosis would have on my life and long-term treatment, I was hospitalized and prescribed Zoloft (100mg/day). Within a month on Zoloft I had experienced my first suicide attempt. This happened after I spent a six hour period running down the street naked underneath a fur coat in the pouring ran without realizing the ridiculousness of what I was doing because I was feeling high all the time, taking ativan liberally, and experiencing intense alcohol cravings. My behavior alienated my family and friends and ruined numerous lifelong alliances I had prior to Zoloft. Everyone thought I had gone off the deep end, including me to some degree. I trusted my doctor completely at that point when he said I had a “chemical imbalance” and that I would take prescribed drugs for “the rest of my life”. After a series of numerous mood-stabilizers and other drugs used to treat manic-depressives I was not doing any better. In fact, my situation had only continues to deteriorate. It was a year later before I started to say to my doctor, “hey! You know what? I’m not getting any better and in fact I’m getting worse!” He couldn’t have agreed less. Said I didn’t have any “insight”.

After frantic calls to his office begging for help to get off the drugs then trying (unsuccessfully) to go off the drugs without his help, I suffered one more suicide attempt. Enough was enough. I knew it was the drugs and didn’t care if no one believed me. I went from gainfully employed, intelligent and self-sufficient to reckless, unemployable, brain-dead and dependent all in a matter of two years. All I can say is, it is your life to lose. If you choose to take Zoloft then realize that your life could seriously be put in danger – and nobody, not even your doctor will be able to save you if all hell breaks loose because he/she doesn’t even really know what the long-term side effects are.

The good news is that I have been off the drugs since and knowing what I know now will never trust such a self-serving inhumane profession as psychiatry. My doctors only stood to make more money by keeping me in the prison of psych drugs so there was little incentive for him provide alternative healing or to try and get me off the drugs he prescribed until it is too late. (By the way he never admitted that he failed to monitor my side effects or reported any of my suicide attempts to the FDA).

Until doctors admit failing their patients miserably on this issue and take strides to prevent drug companies from propagandizing drugs and myths about depression and its treatment, then more and more people like me are going to start coming out of the woodwork. If you care about your families and loved ones please get the word out! SSRI’s can be extremely dangerous and can even be deadly. Take it from me, I know from first hand experience and was lucky enough to survive the ordeal, however many are not as lucky as me.

 

3/14/2002

This is Survivor Story number 39.
Total number of stories in current database is 48

438 total views, no views today