ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN KILLERS: Suicide: Woman: England

Paragraph 11 reads:  “A post-mortem examination also
found a mixture of other painkillers and anti-depressants
in therapeutic rather than fatal amounts, but they could have worked
to enhance the effect of the pills.”

http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/s/2065818_grieving_nurse_had_spoken_of_suicide

Grieving nurse had spoken of suicide

February 15,
2010

A nurse who was found dead on her sofa had taken an overdose of her
daughter’s painkillers, an inquest heard.

Lindsay Davies, 50, was
discovered by her 22-year-old daughter at the family home in Southcote on August
26.

She had just finished a 10-day stint of night shifts at the Duchess
of Kent House in West Reading and the inquest heard it was thought she decided
to have a few drinks and fall asleep on the sofa.

Her husband Ian, known
as Terry, woke to the sound of her falling off the sofa at 2am and went
downstairs to pick her up and put her back on the settee at their home in
Worcester Close.

Giving evidence at the inquest on Tuesday, Mr Davies
said that he had left for work at around 6.30am and his wife was still snoring
soundly on the sofa. He said: “She had just finished night shifts and was
exhausted. It was not unusual for her to have a few drinks and relax when she
knew she didn’t have to go to work the next day.

“She had mentioned a few
things about taking her life but it was soon after her mother died and I just
thought it was normal to talk like that. I didn’t think she would actually do
anything, especially not where her family would find her.”

Mrs Davies,
who had a history of depression, had discussed taking her life with her daughter
but had said she would walk into the sea until she drowned and take her beloved
dog Charlie with her.

Her husband found a number of empty pill packets in
the house and some food bags of ham that had been laced with pills. But the dog,
who had been sleeping next to her, showed no signs of
poisoning.

Berkshire coroner Peter Bedford said that Mrs Davies had pills
in her stomach containing a painkiller that was prescribed to her daughter who
also suffered depression.

The pills were a potentially fatal
dose.

A post-mortem examination also found a mixture of other painkillers
and anti-depressants in therapeutic rather than fatal amounts, but they could
have worked to enhance the effect of the pills.

Recording an open
verdict, Mr Bedford said: “There is not enough evidence to allow me to reach a
clear conclusion.

“There is no suicide note, there is only one drug that
she overdosed in her body when you expect someone to try and take all the pills
you could get your hands on, and the fact she had said she would not do it at
home where her daughter would find her.

“There is doubt for me
there.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder : Man Kills Wife with Hammer: England

Paragraph 22 reads:  “Ignatius Hughes, defending, said
that in June 2008 his client was “on the brink” psychologically and had a long
history of depression for which he had been
prescribed medication.”

http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/homepage/Bristol-mum-bludgeoned-death-lump-hammer/article-1449304-detail/article.html

Bristol mum bludgeoned to death with a lump hammer

Saturday, October 24, 2009, 07:00

A man who bludgeoned his partner
to death with a lump hammer while in the grip of psychosis has been told he may
never be released from jail.

Paul Ford, aged 51, told police he thought
he had hit mother-of-five Debra Ford “hundreds and hundreds and hundreds” of
times in the face at the home they shared in Oldland Common.

He was
jailed indefinitely at Bristol Crown Court yesterday for what a judge described
as a “truly terrible” killing, which left his victim unrecognisable.

The
court heard the couple shared the same surname because Mrs Ford, 45, had
previously been married to the defendant’s brother Geoffrey, with whom she had
two children, and had also been married to his brother Steve.

Her three
other children were by another man.

Ford initially faced a murder charge
but pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished
responsibility.

Doctors later confirmed a combination of drug use,
post-accident stress disorder and depression all contributed to his psychosis at
the time.

Imposing an indefinite sentence for public protection, Mr
Justice Royce said Ford would serve a minimum of three years before he could be
considered for release. But he stressed that he considered Ford to be dangerous
and, if it was deemed appropriate by the Parole Board, he could face the rest of
his life behind bars.

Ray Tully, prosecuting, told the court the couple’s
relationship, which had started in 2007, was “volatile on both sides”.

In
the 48 hours leading up to the killing they were seen in two pubs; in one Ford
scuffled with a man and in the other Debra was seen “goading” the
defendant.

Mr Tully said Ford attacked his partner in the living room of
their home at The Clamp, Oldland Common, on the evening of September 3 last
year.

“She was battered round the head with such force her facial
features became indiscernible,” said Mr Tully.

“He walked next door,
still carrying the hammer, he spoke to a neighbour and asked her to call the
police.

“He said: ‘I hit her, I killed her, I done it so my boys will be
safe’.”

Mr Tully said Debra Ford had for a long time associated with a
large number of people who led a criminal lifestyle.

He said that, at the
time of her death, she was waiting to be sentenced for dishonesty and drug
supply, and had been a regular user of amphetamine and cannabis.

Mr Tully
said: “There is clear evidence Debra Ford could be argumentative and
manipulative.

“Her daughter said that she also suffered from bad health,
having had surgery in 2003 for an abscess to her back which made her wheelchair
bound. Thereafter she walked with calipers and used walking sticks to get about
and she was considered frail and vulnerable.”

On the day of the killing
Ford ate with his parents and brothers and told Geoffrey: “You know I’m an angry

man. I’m an angry man at the best of times.”

He was then seen to turn up
at The Clamp, and was alone with Debra when he unleashed the fatal
attack.

The court heard Ford told police: “We had a scuffle and I just
did her. I don’t know where I got it (the hammer) from. I just grabbed it from
something. I thought that there were people upstairs; I thought I was being
trapped and cornered. I’m turning into a paranoid wreck. I’ve had so much
hassle; I thought I was being trapped.”

Ignatius Hughes, defending, said
that in June 2008 his client was “on the brink” psychologically and had a long
history of depression for which he had been prescribed medication.

He
said it would be impossible to establish what degree of real threats Ford
experienced as opposed to his perceived threats because of psychosis.

Mr
Hughes said the relationship was the catalyst, which made a re-occurrence most
unlikely.

The majority of psychiatrists who examined Ford did not
conclude it would be appropriate for him to be treated in a psychiatric
institution.

Passing sentence, Mr Justice Royce told Ford: “This was a
truly terrible killing. The lives of those closest to her have been terribly
scarred in consequence.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN MEDS: Death: Former Woman Soldier: England

Paragraphs two and three read:  “Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers andantidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.”

“Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.”

http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=ENOnline&category=News&tBrand=ENOnline&tCategory=news&itemid=NOED27%20Aug%202009%2007%3A35%3A01%3A210

Uncertainty over overdose death

Chanice Ward.
REBECCA GOUGH
27 August 2009 07:35

A coroner has ruled that a young woman who was discharged from the army against her will and who died of an overdose earlier this year may not have deliberately taken her own life.

Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers and antidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.

Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.

The inquest heard how Miss Ward, who was pursuing a case for compensation with the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency, had a history of depression and died as a result of a “self-administered overdose”.

Mr Ward, 57, who served 22 years in the army, said: “I know this inquest could not appoint blame but I’m certainly of the opinion that her time in the military and in active service worsened her state of mind. We have a case going on with the MoD and will be continuing her cause.”

For the last five years Miss Ward, of Barford, near Hethersett, had been working at Norwich Union in Surrey Street, Norwich and was a PA in the pensions department.

Since the age of 18 she had served six years in the Royal Medical Corps as a combat medic and ambulance technician, from 1997 to 2003, and won award medals from Bosnia and Kosovo.

She was found dead in the caravan she rented in Barford on April 3, but speaking at her inquest, her family and friends said they were shocked she had taken an overdose.

Her mother, Donna Holder, said her daughter was diagnosed with depression when she was a teenager but had appeared much happier in recent months.

Ms Holder said: “It was a very great shock because she was so well and had so many future plans and so much to look forward to.”

Mr Ward added that he had taken a phone call from his daughter a few weeks before she died, and said: “She said to me ‘I don’t think I’ve got long left to live’, and I said she was being silly but I knew deep down that she knew it.

“In the last six months she appeared tremendously upbeat but there was something underlying. She always appeared on the surface to be putting on a front but you never knew underneath what was going on.”

Her close friend Stanley Woodhouse was with her the weekend before she died and said: “I think I probably spent more time with her in the last few months of her life than anybody did.

“She thought the medication she was on had solved a lot of her problems but, as her father has said, we didn’t really know what was going on deep down. The feeling she gave to me was that she was upbeat about life.”

In an interview with our sister paper the Evening News earlier this year Ms Ward claimed she twice tried to kill herself but that her bosses would not accept she was suffering from an illness.

A MoD spokesman said: “Our thoughts are with the family of Chanice Ward at this difficult time.

“We take the welfare of all our service personnel and veterans seriously.

“We have made great progress both in the treatment of mental health problems and in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help.

“Treatment for mental health disorders, including post-traumatic stress, is also available for veterans through six community-based mental health pilot schemes the MoD has created with the NHS.”

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