ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Two Dead: Oregon

Paragraph seven reads: “The family had known Phillips for years. They
said he took numerous medications, including antidepressants and pain
medications while he waited for hip-replacement surgery.”

http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100422/NEWS/4220320/
-1/NEWSMAP

April 22, 2010

By Anita Burke
Mail Tribune

MEDFORD ­ Family, friends and a west Medford neighborhood mourn a
murder-suicide that left a man and woman dead on Monday.

Gregory Alan Phillips, 57, shot his former girlfriend, Evalina Maria
Lattoure, 39, three times in the head and neck with a .22-caliber revolver
before fatally shooting himself, Medford police said. The shootings happened at
about 2:20 p.m. Monday in the driveway of a duplex at 725 Beekman Ave.,
where the two, along with other roommates including Lattoure’s 9-year-old
daughter and the girl’s father, were moving.

The group had lived just down the street in a house that was foreclosed in
January and they had just been evicted, Jackson County Circuit Court
records show.

“They were very nice people,” said Dustin Wilhelmi, who lives in the
adjoining unit of the duplex and saw Phillips shoot himself. “I don’t know why
he would do that to her.”

Lattoure’s 17-year-old son, who lives with other relatives in Jackson
County and asked that his name not be published, said Phillips “took the life
of a great and wonderful woman.”

He said his mother also has a 22-year-old son who lives in California, as
well as a sister and other relatives who were gathering to plan a funeral.

The family had known Phillips for years. They said he took numerous
medications, including antidepressants and pain medications while he waited for
hip-replacement surgery.

“Maybe he wasn’t in his right mind when he did this,” Lattoure’s teenage
son said, wondering compassionately what the loss must be like for Phillips’
aging mother in California, who must now deal with the knowledge that her
son is a murderer.

Medford police Lt. Bob Hansen said that Lattoure and Phillips had argued
earlier in the day, but each had left, apparently to cool down separately.
Investigators didn’t release details about that conflict.

Phillips’ car was in the driveway of the duplex Monday afternoon when
Lattoure pulled up, police said. She approached his car, then was shot.

An autopsy showed that a fatal shot hit Lattoure’s spine, her son said.

As neighbors heard shots Monday afternoon and called 9-1-1, Medford police
quickly notified Washington Elementary and South Medford High schools,
which went into precautionary lockdown, as did the Medford School District’s
central office.

School officials praised prompt and clear communication from police, who
evaluated the potential threat to schools. As soon as investigators
determined that everyone involved in the shooting was dead, the lockdown was lifted.

Washington Principal Joe Frazier said police and schools train to work
well together in emergencies and that training paid off.

Teachers had information about the shooting right away so they could
grieve after school, Frazier said. Then, on Tuesday morning, the school gathered
students to acknowledge the tragedy that had happened in the neighborhood
and reassure them that they were safe in school, he said.

Teachers provided some time for students to deal with grief, then helped
them return their focus to learning, he said. The district provided
additional counseling for a few students who needed more help.

The Children’s Advocacy Center is also assisting Lattoure’s family,
officials said.

Reach reporter Anita Burke at 541-776-4485, or e-mail
aburke@mailtribune.com.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT/HEAD INJURY: Man Made Violent Threats, Possible Murderer, UT

In a letter to the court, a therapist reported that due to a severe head
injury Mortensen suffered in a fall off a cliff in 1994, his “daily functioning”
was “extremely limited,” and going to jail would hinder his treatment.

The therapist wrote that Mortensen was on medication to treat depression, and
that his condition made full-time employment difficult. Judge Steven Hansen
ultimately ruled that Mortensen was not mentally ill and sentenced him to 45
days of home confinement.

Months
before the sentencing in 1999, Mortensen and his wife at the time sought
protective orders against each other. In her petition for a protective order,
Mortensen’s wife said he had been “acting really crazy.”

“He told me that he could see the devil and that he had been borne by the
devil rather than by God,” the petition states.

She claimed that Mortensen, who she said was “addicted to marijuana” and
drank often, threw her against a wall and slapped her face. Her petition also
states that Mortensen frequently picked on her son and said he was going to kill
him.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/700006613/Son-of-slain-BYU-professor-Kay-Mortensen-has-history-of-violent-crime.html

Son
of slain BYU professor Kay Mortensen has history of violent crime

By Paul Koepp

Deseret
News

Published:
Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010 5:45 p.m. MST

PAYSON — A Payson man named as a “person of interest” in the slaying of his
father has previously made violent threats against family members and others,
court documents state.

Investigators say Roger Mortensen and his wife, Pamela, have made
inconsistent statements about what happened Nov. 16, the night retired BYU
professor Kay Mortensen, 70, was found with his throat slashed in a bathtub in
his Payson Canyon home. Authorities have labeled both as persons of interest in
the homicide case.

On July 13, 1996, Roger Mortensen was driving down Mineral
Basin Road in American Fork Canyon on a four-wheeler when he passed a car full
of Boy Scouts, according to an affidavit filed in 4th District Court. For
reasons that are unclear, Mortensen became “very upset,” stopped and pulled out
a handgun, the affidavit states.

He allegedly began yelling and pointed the gun at the driver’s head. The
driver continued down to a camp near Timpanogos Cave and reported the assault to
authorities, who tracked down Mortensen and found him with the gun and a
marijuana pipe, the affidavit states.

Mortensen was charged with aggravated assault, drug possession and receiving
stolen property after detectives discovered he had a $4,000 radar unit belonging
to the Utah Highway Patrol. A prosecutor stated in court papers that Mortensen
was employed by UHP at the time, but the agency says it has no record of him
working there.

Mortensen pleaded no contest to reduced charges of theft and exhibiting a
dangerous weapon, and was given probation.

When Mortensen was charged with theft in 1997 for
allegedly helping his roommate steal dozens of tools from an Orem hardware store
where Mortensen worked as a cashier, a jury found him guilty but mentally
ill.

In a letter to the court, a therapist reported that due to a severe head
injury Mortensen suffered in a fall off a cliff in 1994, his “daily functioning”
was “extremely limited,” and going to jail would hinder his treatment.

“He remembers how he used to be and has not yet accepted his limitations,”
the letter states.

The therapist also said that when Mortensen had previously been in jail, he
was threatened and beaten by a group of inmates, and would later receive notices
when one of the inmates who had gone to prison had a parole hearing.

“This terrifies Roger,” the letter states. “He is afraid he will be killed if
he goes to jail.”

The therapist wrote that Mortensen was on medication to treat depression, and
that his condition made full-time employment difficult. Judge Steven Hansen
ultimately ruled that Mortensen was not mentally ill and sentenced him to 45
days of home confinement.

Months
before the sentencing in 1999, Mortensen and his wife at the time sought
protective orders against each other. In her petition for a protective order,
Mortensen’s wife said he had been “acting really crazy.”

“He told me that he could see the devil and that he had been borne by the
devil rather than by God,” the petition states.

She claimed that Mortensen, who she said was “addicted to marijuana” and
drank often, threw her against a wall and slapped her face. Her petition also
states that Mortensen frequently picked on her son and said he was going to kill
him.

In his petition seeking a protective order against her, Mortensen said his
wife lied about the assaults and warned him that her son had friends in a gang
who would kill him. The couple soon divorced.

Mortensen was later convicted of violating the protective order by making
harassing phone calls. A judge ordered him to take an anger management
class.

In a separate case in Spanish Fork, Mortensen entered a
plea in abeyance in 2003 for providing alcohol to a minor after an altercation
with his stepson.

Greg Skordas, an attorney representing Roger and Pamela Mortensen, said his
client “just can’t say anything at this
time.”

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