CELEXA: Police Officer Who Shot Man Was On Celexa:

Paragraph six reads: “Holt, who investigators determined

fired the fatal shot, was ultimately released from duty. Gabriel

continues to work for the Breckenridge police department.”

Paragraph 79

reads:  “Toxicology reports taken on the three officers showed that

Holt also had 1450 NG/ML of Celexa in his urine. There were no

drugs or other substances detected in results for Gabriel or

McMullen.”

http://www.reporternews.com/news/2009/nov/28/shooting-death-not-forgotten/

Breckenridge shooting death not forgotten

It has been one year

since Michael Richardson was shot to death by Breckenridge police, but the

grieving continues for family and friends.

Shai Berry, a family friend,

organized Justice for Mike to raise funds to help Richardson’s family. Her

response is typical of those with questions that have lingered since his

death.

“Mike didn’t have to die that night,” Berry said. “Not only his

death, but the way he died left a hole in the hearts of so many that only

justice can begin to heal.”

Richardson, 37, of Albany, died from a single

gunshot wound during a confrontation with police at 12:36 a.m. Nov. 29, 2008,

initial reports said.

Breckenridge police officers Scott Gabriel and

Jason Holt were on paid leave until the grand jury in May determined there was

not enough evidence to prosecute them for the shooting.

Holt, who

investigators determined fired the fatal shot, was ultimately released from

duty. Gabriel continues to work for the Breckenridge police

department.

Many questions have surrounded the case in the weeks and

months after the shooting death.

The Reporter-News filed a public

information request with the Department of Public Safety and received copies of

the reports from officers and witnesses involved, as well as copies of in-dash

videos recorded at the scene.

However, a request to the city of

Breckenridge for the personnel files of the two officers was challenged by

attorneys for the city, even after the Attorney General of Texas ruled that the

city should release the files.

To date, the city has not turned over the

officers’ personnel files.

Mark Haney, a Fort Worth attorney who

represents Richardson’s family, also has been denied access to the officers’

personnel records.

Haney said last week he plans to file a federal

lawsuit alleging civil rights violations.

“We intend to file suit because

we believe that the death of Michael Richardson should never had occurred but

for the actions of the police department, and we intend to hold them accountable

for that loss,” Haney said. “The citizens of Breckenridge need to have some

light shined on that police department.”

Andy Messer, the attorney hired

by the city of Breckenridge, said he will “vigorously defend” the city and the

officials should a lawsuit be filed.

“We expected a lawsuit the minute we

received notice of their representation of counsel,” Messer said.

Messer

has filed motions blocking the release of the personnel records.

“We

think the Texas Rangers investigation shows the important facts of the case,”

Messer said. “We think the officers were justified in their actions.”

A

day before

The day before the shooting, Richardson spent Thanksgiving

with his mother Connie Jackson and his sister and her three children.

“We

did all of the cooking and everyone kind of helped,” Connie Jackson remembered.

“We watched football and stayed close to home.”

Then everybody napped for

a while, got up a little later and ate some more.

“I remember Michael got

him a great big piece of pecan pie and got on the bed and watched football,” his

mother recalled.

He slept at her house that night. They all got up early

that morning to go shop.

First they stopped to get cell phones for

Richardson’s two sons, Bryant and Bryson, both teenagers. Then the family went

to Walmart.

“We were calling each other on cell phones in the store and

finally as I was checking out I saw him by the Christmas trees and waved,”

Connie said.

That would be the last time she saw her son

alive.

After shopping, Richardson and some friends were out shooting

feral hogs. He left with a cooler loaded down with Gatorade and set out with a

rifle he kept in his truck.

“He usually never drank when he was hunting,”

said his uncle, James Jackson.

The hunting trip with a friend was the

reason her son had a gun in his truck, his mother, said Connie

Jackson.

Afterward, he went back to Albany where he lived, dropped off

the gifts for his two sons, Bryant and Bryson, cleaned up and headed back to

Breckenridge.

Hours before death

When he returned to Breckenridge

later that evening, Richardson reportedly headed over to Potter’s Bar and Grill.

In a report taken by investigators from the Texas Rangers, owner and bartender

Amy Potter said that Richardson usually came into the bar once or twice a

week.

On Friday, Nov. 28, the bar was busy, with about 140 customers

inside. Potter told investigators she had never met Richardson but knew who he

was. Several of her bartenders knew him.

She said he usually drank Vodka

and 7-Up but “sometimes he drinks fake drinks to give the impression he is

drinking.”

That night, Richardson paid for two rounds of shots for

friends and paid for five mixed drinks. He paid his tab of $230 at 12:15 a.m.

Potter said he was buying drinks for friends and handing them out just before

last call.

“Everyone said Michael was sober when he left the bar,” Potter

said in the statement. He took local bail bondsman Buddy Moser home that

night.

In his statement to investigators, Moser said when Richardson

asked him if he needed a ride home, he said he did. When the two left the bar,

he told investigators he thought “Michael was acting fine and was all right to

drive.”

“I went into my house and heard what sounded like seven

gunshots,” Moser’s affidavit says. “I never thought it was involving Michael.”

Moser said he called his son after hearing that Richardson had been

shot.

“At no time did I ever see a gun in Michael’s truck,” Moser

said.

As he drove away from Moser’s home, Richardson reportedly ran over

a trash can and was dragging it under his truck, he made his way down the street

and eventually landed with his truck hung up on a chain-link fence at the

intersection of West 1st Street and North Court Avenue. In his statement to

investigators, homeowner William Lord said he believed Richardson was about to

drive his truck through the home there.

Lord went to the driver’s side

window and asked Richardson what he was doing but noted he had a blank look on

his face.

The initial call to 911 was made by a woman who reported her

mailbox down.

Officers’ accounts

According to Reporter-News

archives, when officers arrived on the scene, they found Richardson’s pickup

caught on an aluminum gate post with the wheels spinning.

The officers

said Richardson did not respond to their verbal commands, and they believed he

was reaching for a .22 caliber rifle, so one of the officers fired into the

truck.

The investigation revealed that both officers fired their weapons

and that the fatal shot was fired from Holt’s gun.

Holt was dispatched to

the scene at 500 Court Street at 12:38 a.m.

Holt, who had been a police

officer for a little less than six years, said when he was approaching the

scene, he noticed a large cloud of smoke coming from a red 2007 Dodge Ram

pickup. Holt said he believed Richardson, who he called “the suspect” was

attempting to drive through the home and wanted to get away from

police.

In his statement, Holt claims he saw Richardson reach down and

touch the scope on the rifle so he opened fire.

Meanwhile Officer Scott

Gabriel arrived on the scene with Wayne McMullen, the city code enforcement

officer who was accompanying him on patrol.

In his statement, Gabriel

said he tried to get Richardson’s attention, by attempting to break out the

windows of the vehicle with a baton or the butt of his revolver, but he could

not.

He then fired shots into the tires of the vehicle and his weapon

jammed. Gabriel said he saw a rifle in the front seat but did not indicate he

saw Richardson reaching for it.

There was only one streetlight

illuminating the area, and Richardson’s windows had a dark tint. In the two to

three minutes from the time Holt arrived to the time shots were fired, Holt

maintains in his statement that he saw Richardson reach for the

rifle.

“Without any other choice, I reacted by firing several shots at

the suspect driver, through the passenger side front window,” Holt wrote in his

report. Holt said he recalled firing seven shots into the

vehicle.

Gabriel was on the driver’s side of the vehicle when he radioed

dispatch that “shots had been fired,” according to his statement.

“I

heard multiple shots being fired from the direction that Officer Holt was at,”

Gabriel reported.

Gabriel said the truck stopped moving, and he went to

the passenger side to assess the situation.

Meanwhile, Holt had radioed

in for an ambulance.

All three officers said Richardson looked at them

with a blank stare, like he did not know what was going on.

One of the

shots hit Richardson just above the right ear and killed him.

When

Gabriel finally got the door of the vehicle open, he noted Richardson was

slumped over to the right side with blood coming from his head. Gabriel assisted

medics in loading Richardson onto the ambulance.

The

aftermath

Texas Ranger Sgt. Shane Morrow was called to the scene to

conduct the investigation.

Immediately after the shooting, Holt was

escorted to the patrol car of DPS Trooper Grant Atkinson. Moments later, the

weapons of Holt, Gabriel and McMullen were confiscated, and the three officers

were taken to the police department where they gave their

statements.

Moments after the shooting, Gabriel reported that he

retrieved the rifle from the passenger side of the vehicle. Atkinson

corroborated that report, saying he offered cover while Gabriel retrieved the

rifle.

“I did not see the exact location of the rifle since I was at the

back of the pickup,” Atkinson’s statement says.

Witness Angelo Santos,

who lived across the street, said he saw an officer break out the driver’s side

window after the shots were fired.

“The officer reached in the driver

side door and grabbed a long brown item that appeared to be a rifle with black

clip … and handed it to a fireman,” Santos recalled in his

statement.

Meanwhile, Richardson was transported to the Stephens County

Memorial Hospital, where doctors pronounced him brain-dead. He was then sent to

Harris Hospital in Fort Worth, where he was pronounced dead. His body was then

transported to the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Officer for an

autopsy.

The next day

Within 24 hours, the Texas Rangers released

Richardson’s bullet-ridden truck to his family.

And the next day, family

and friends gathered at the local wrecking yard for a memorial service to honor

Richardson. They looked at and touched the truck, which was riddled with more

than 20 bullet holes and still had Richardson’s blood covering the

console.

“He never even had a traffic ticket,” his father Wayne

Richardson said at the service.

The truck was impounded again about a

month after the shooting, so investigators could continue the

investigation.

The science

The Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s

Office ruled the death a homicide. Richardson died from a single gunshot wound

behind his right ear, which was determined to have come from Holt’s gun, a .40

caliber Glock semi-automatic handgun.

The autopsy, conducted by Dr. Nizam

Peerwani, revealed that Richardson had an enlarged heart, but there were no

other remarkable findings.

Toxicology results released in February by the

Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office show Richardson’s blood alcohol level

was at .053 percent, below the .08 legal limit for intoxication in

Texas.

The level of the antidepressant citalopram, known by the brand

name Celexa, was found in Richardson’s blood and wasn’t remarkable at 52 NG/ML

(nanograms). Ibuprofen also was detected in his system.

Toxicology

reports taken on the three officers showed that Holt also had 1450 NG/ML of

Celexa in his urine. There were no drugs or other substances detected in results

for Gabriel or McMullen.

Officers’ jobs

Almost immediately

questions swirled around the officers and the circumstances involved in the

shooting. Holt, 29, had only been with the department for one year and eight

months before he was fired. In the five years and seven months that Holt has

been a certified peace officer, he has worked for five law enforcement agencies,

including Breckenridge.

He also worked at the Lamb County Sheriff’s

Office, Idalou Police Department, Borger Police Department, Petersburg Police

Department and as a jailer for the Floyd County Sheriff’s Office, according to

the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education, or

TCLEOSE.

Records now indicate Holt was hired by the Wheeler County

Sheriff’s Office in August. TCLEOSE records do not show that any disciplinary

actions have been filed against him.

Gabriel, 34, remains on the

Breckenridge police force, having worked there his entire career, according to

TCLEOSE records. Gabriel became a certified peace officer in May of

2007.

The family’s hope

Connie Jackson still carries the message

in a fortune cookie that was pulled out of her son’s car the day hundreds of

friends and family gathered at the wrecking yard.

It reads: “A great

honor will be bestowed upon you in the coming year.”

His mother said the

best honor would be answers to this case.

“I would like to get to the

bottom of this and find out why my son was killed,” she said.

In a

perfect world, she wants her son back, but she knows that is

impossible.

“Plus I want my son’s name cleared, of being a drunk and

pulling a gun on a police officer because I want his kids to be able to hold

their heads up and know how respected he was.”

Justice for Mike

In

the days and weeks that followed Richardson’s death, friend and family

questioned the actions of the police.

“It is important for us to make

sure if something like this ever happens again, it is handled without taking a

man’s life,” said Berry, who founded Justice for Mike. “Mike’s family,

especially his young boys, are still feeling the anguish of losing him. Their

pain is as raw as it was one year ago.”

Berry said she and others are

overwhelmed with emotion on the anniversary of Richardson’s death.

“I

hope this story reminds everyone exactly what they have to be thankful for this

year. I am completely overwhelmed with emotion this week,” she said. “I hope

someday we can look back on all this and know we both made a difference

here.”

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EFFEXOR: Police Officer Becomes Aggressive With Captain: Suit: NJ

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Czech’s report indicated Ruroede
suffers from a seizure disorder and as a consequence takes
Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone, all of which
have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also claimed
that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk of over
aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/78389717.html

Former officer‘s suit gets a court date
Thursday, December 3, 2009


Community News (Lodi Edition)
STAFF WRITER

A former police
lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go before the court
early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against the borough, the
police department and the mayor and council earlier this year following his
termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec. 9, 2008.
Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County Superior
Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede was fired
from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert Czech, Esq. of
Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided “untruthful
responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions of March 23,
2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt. George Egbert.
Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate, withheld information,
failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and handled firearms while
unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological evaluation determined
that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit, Ruroede seeks to have
Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police department and pay
lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges against Ruroede stem
from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney Station bar in East
Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at the bar prior to the
fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm during the course of a
verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that Ruroede lifted him “by the
jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off the ground.”

In
the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a derogatory remark about a
female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert
grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued in the manner he
did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s testimony,
according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert called
both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a

seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path the
mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John Boppert
of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert Wunsch,
was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

A
former police lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go
before the court early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against
the borough, the police department and the mayor and council earlier this year
following his termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec.
9, 2008. Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County
Superior Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede
was fired from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert
Czech, Esq. of Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided
“untruthful responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions
of March 23, 2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt.
George Egbert. Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate,
withheld information, failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and
handled firearms while unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological
evaluation determined that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit,
Ruroede seeks to have Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police
department and pay lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges
against Ruroede stem from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney
Station bar in East Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at
the bar prior to the fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm
during the course of a verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that
Ruroede lifted him “by the jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off
the ground.”

In the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a
derogatory remark about a female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the
bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued
in the manner he did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s
testimony, according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert
called both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a
seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance
Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path
the mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John
Boppert of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert
Wunsch, was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

523 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Widow Assaults Policemen With her Handbag: England

Paragraphs 1 & 2 read: A mother has been convicted after
“deliberately wielding a handbag” and striking a police
officer.

Diminutive Lorna Vinten, 44, charged in to help her son who was
being restrained by four police officers, swinging her small blue handbag
containing her keys, cigarettes and mobile phone.

Paragraph 12 reads:  “Fining her a total of £1,040, and
giving her a two-year conditional discharge, Judge Jackson said she had taken
into account the fact that Mrs Vinten’s husband had passed away last year, that
she suffered panic attacks and
was on
anti-depressants.

http://www.thisissurreytoday.co.uk/news/Mother-assaulted-officer/article-1552942-detail/article.html

Mother assaulted officer

Wednesday, December 02, 2009, 06:00

A mother has been
convicted after “deliberately wielding a handbag” and striking a police
officer.

Diminutive Lorna Vinten, 44, charged in to help her son who was
being restrained by four police officers, swinging her small blue handbag
containing her keys, cigarettes and mobile phone.

But despite Redhill
Magistrates’ Court hearing the handbag had struck with the force of a pillow,
Mrs Vinten was convicted of two counts of assault, and resisting a constable in
the execution of his duty.

Speaking after the hearing, Mrs Vinten said:
“I’m just glad it’s all over. It’s been a very stressful time for me. I’m just
worried about losing my job now.”

The incident occurred at the Royal
British Legion in Town End, Caterham, on the evening of May 24, after the High
Street Party enjoyed by thousands of visitors.

Police entered the Legion
building asking revellers to drink up, and ended up restraining 17-year-old
Ricky Vinten near the exit.

Defence counsel Natasha Draycott told the
court how Mrs Vinten had rushed to aid her son, but was grabbed by the throat,
and thrown onto a table by “enthusiastic” officers.

Ms Draycott said:
“Officers were using completely unreasonable force, she was kicking out in sheer
panic.”

Mrs Vinten had claimed her handbag had fallen down her arm and
had been flying around, but she had not intended to hit anyone.

But
presiding over the hearing, District Judge Caroline Jackson said: “Looking at
the CCTV it’s clear excessive force was not used (by the police).

“I find
there are deliberate acts of wielding the handbag.”

Fining her a total of
£1,040, and giving her a two-year conditional discharge, Judge Jackson said she
had taken into account the fact that Mrs Vinten’s husband had passed away last
year, that she suffered panic attacks and was on anti-depressants.

Mrs
Vinten’s son Ricky was also convicted of assault, resisting an officer in the
execution of his duty and using threatening, insulting or abusive words or
behaviour or disorderly behaviour with intent to cause alarm or distress. His
sentencing was adjourned.

424 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Antidepressant-Induced Violence in America

Paragraphs 23 through 25 read:  “Breggin studied medical
and other records of 50 cases of the newer antidepressants and violence, suicide
or disruptive behavior for his book, he said.”

In one case, a man
on an antidepressant wanted to die so badly that he ran into a police
officer with his car so he could knock him down, get his gun and try to shoot
himself.
Breggin said the police officer
didn’t press for a lengthy jail sentence because he thought the drug had
essentially driven the man crazy.”

“He said there is

no question that antidepressants can lead to
violence.”

Are claims just an excuse?

Poyner said she’s aware that critics will charge that antidepressant
claims merely offer criminals an excuse.

“I know that and I would have
said the same thing until I read this research,” Poyner said. “I worked
in prisons. I’ve treated inmates and so I tend to be very skeptical of somebody
trying to blame something on something else, especially a medication that is
prescribed by a doctor. But now I’m taking a second look at that thought and
saying, ‘Wait a minute.’”

http://newsok.com/oklahom-experts-look-at-antidepressants/article/3419386

Oklahoma experts look at antidepressants
Recent violence in Fort Hood,
Nichols Hills has some looking at links with medication

BY SONYA COLBERG
Published: November 22, 2009

As soon as news hit that the alleged Fort
Hood
, Texas,
shooter was a military psychiatrist, a disturbing thought struck Oklahoma
psychologist Gail Poyner.

  • Questions
    remain
    about risk to public
  • 11/22/2009 The debate over whether antidepressants play a role in suicides
    and homicides has taken twists and turns over the years. Drug company
    GlaxoSmithKline sent a…
“I wondered if….

“I think it would be interesting to know if
he had been taking an SSRI (antidepressant). It seems, based on news reports,
that he was very depressed. He may have taken an SSRI and that may have played a
part. Hopefully that will be investigated to determine,” said Poyner, a Ph.D.
with a practice in Choctaw.

Poyner was out of state and was shocked to
hear of the local allegations against Dr.
Stephen Paul Wolf
, jailed on murder and assault complaints in connection
with the recent stabbing death of his 9-year-old son, Tommy. The Nichols
Hills
doctor told the medical licensure board that he took antidepressants,
records show.

Wolf told the board he was hospitalized for depression and
under psychotherapy until his 1988 graduation from medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
.

He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized
again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,” Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. “I returned to work after my hospitalization on adjusted
dosages of antidepressants.”

It is unclear whether antidepressant usage
might have played any role in the Nov. 16 stabbing.

“Crimes that involve
this horrendous departure from one’s character and typical behavior may warrant
an investigation,” Poyner said. “Investigators may want to look into a possible
connection between his behavior and a recent introduction or increase in an

antidepressant.”

She added that every crime committed by someone taking
an antidepressant isn’t necessarily related to the antidepressant. A small
percentage of people have a genetic abnormality that can cause a violent
reaction to certain antidepressants, she said.

“We’re finding there are
cases of criminal behavior, especially violent and out-of-character criminal
behavior, that may be linked to these antidepressants,” Poyner said.

If
there’s blood on someone’s hands, investigate whether antidepressants were in

their systems, some experts say. The drugs are considered particularly dangerous
when certain patients are just beginning antidepressants, increasing the dosage
or getting off antidepressants, Poyner said.

But other experts say
there’s no clear evidence that antidepressants and violence go hand-in-hand.

Fort Hood raises questions
Dr.
Peter Breggin
, a medical doctor, former Johns
Hopkins University
faculty associate and author of “Medication Madness: The
Role of Psychiatric Drugs in Violence, Suicide and Murder,” said he immediately
wondered if Maj.
Nidal Hasan
was self-medicating.

“I think it was very likely,”
Breggin said.

Hasan was charged recently with 13 premeditated murder
counts stemming from the shootings. Investigators have made allegations about
Hasan exchanging e-mail with a radical imam, connecting with al-Qaida

members, lionizing suicide bombings and yelling “Allahu Akbar!” as the shootings
began. But Breggin said something more subtle might have been missed.

“It’s very possible that if he was … self-medicating, it could have
been Xanax.
I would say not that the drug did it but it might have pushed him over. But we
don’t know,” Breggin said.

He said that, as a psychiatrist, Hasan could
have easily taken antidepressant samples, and he could write his own
prescriptions for antidepressants. The FBI
removed possible evidence from Hasan’s apartment and then allowed media into the
dingy rooms. Among the things reported left behind were bottles of medications,
including some that he prescribed to himself.

Some call studies
inconclusive
For some people, Breggin said, newer antidepressants are “a
virtual prescription for violence.”

Dr.
Jayson Hymes
, though, said the studies are somewhat inconclusive. Some
research suggests the newer family of antidepressants, SSRIs (selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitors), might have a role in causing violence. But
British studies show they decrease the likelihood, he noted.

“Walking
past a bottle of antidepressants is not going to do anything,” Hymes said. “It
sounds to me, in this situation, that a lot of things just got missed by a lot
of people.”

He said the drugs under question are those antidepressants

that have become popular in the past 10 or 15 years: drugs such as Zoloft
and Celexa.
Probably the most violent behavior is a desire in some people to commit suicide,
he said.

A personal theory Hymes has developed indicates that along with
the suicidal thoughts come fatigue and the inability to make a decision and act
on it. The SSRIs work fast so the person’s energy level increases more quickly
than the mood elevation, he said. So the patient, particularly children and
young people, may still feel depressed and suicidal but suddenly has the energy
to act out.

Researcher claims violence tie
Breggin studied medical
and other records of 50 cases of the newer antidepressants and violence, suicide
or disruptive behavior for his book, he said.

In one case, a man on an

antidepressant wanted to die so badly that he ran into a police officer with his
car so he could knock him down, get his gun and try to shoot himself. Breggin
said the police officer didn’t press for a lengthy jail sentence because he
thought the drug had essentially driven the man crazy.

He said there is
no question that antidepressants can lead to violence.

But Hymes said
controversy over antidepressants can lead to frightening people away from drugs
that they may need.

“People can … moan about antidepressants all day
until they look at a loved one lying on the couch, only able to get up and go to
the bathroom and that’s it. In which case, it’s like, ‘Where’s that

antidepressant?’” Hymes said.

Oklahoma’s Poyner recently testified as an
expert witness in a murder case in which the defendant had been on
antidepressants. In the weeks leading up to the trial she examined studies and
stories on the correlation of antidepressants and violence. That research opened
her eyes to the possibilities of some famous cases such as housewife Andrea
Yates
’ drowning of her five children in 2001. But she remains shocked about
the horrible nature of such crimes, she said.

Are claims just an
excuse?

Poyner said she’s aware that critics will charge that antidepressant
claims merely offer criminals an excuse.

“I know that and I would have
said the same thing until I read this research,” Poyner said. “I worked in
prisons. I’ve treated inmates and so I tend to be very skeptical of somebody
trying to blame something on something else, especially a medication that is
prescribed by a doctor. But now I’m taking a second look at that thought and
saying, ‘Wait a minute.’”

Read more: http://newsok.com/oklahom-experts-look-at-antidepressants/article/3419386#ixzz0Xb21LiSq

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Police Officer Suicide After Only Days on Samples: NJ

Last two paragraphs read:  “Cillo tried to socialize
normally with his wife and family for the next few days — going dancing and to
a football game — but also sought help through the Cop-to-Cop crisis hotline.
He met with a hotline social worker and his own family physician, who
prescribed sleeping pills and gave him samples of anti-depressant
medications.
Still feeling confused and anxious on Aug.
27,
he went to Morristown Memorial Hospital. One physician gave him
medication to calm him down and an appointment was set for him to see a
psychiatrist in a few days after he denied suicidal thoughts, court records
said.”

On Aug. 28, the day he died, a hospital social
worker called Cillo at home to check on his welfare and he responded that he was
doing better. His wife brought the children to dental appointments, and upon
returning home, found a suicide note. She called police, who went
to the home and discovered Cillo in the
basement.”

http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20090911/COMMUNITIES/309110001/1005/NEWS01/Wrongful+death+trial+begins+over+Harding+officer+s+suicide

Wrongful death trial begins over Harding officer‘s suicide

By Peggy Wright • Staff Writer • September 11, 2009

A civil trial
is set to start Monday on a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the widow of a
Harding police officer who hanged himself in 2003, a day after he was screened
at Morristown Memorial Hospital for suicidal ideations but not
admitted.

A jury of four men and four women was selected by Thursday
afternoon to hear the wrongful death//medical malpractice claims, and opening
trial statements are set to begin Monday before Superior Court Judge W. Hunt
Dumont in Morristown. At issue is whether the hospital, through a social worker,
registered nurse and psychiatrist named as defendants, was negligent and
breached a duty of care to Harding Officer James Cillo Jr. on Aug. 27,
2003.

Cillo, the 39-year-old son of retired Mendham Police Chief James
Cillo Sr., hanged himself in the basement of his Washington Township home. He
left his widow, Janet, and three daughters, who then were ages 11, 10 and
5.

A key issue in the case is whether hospital staff and its crisis
intervention workers who saw or evaluated Cillo on Aug. 27, 2003, were told that
he had given all his personal firearms to his father for safekeeping, and
stashed his service weapon at police headquarters. Cillo did not use a gun to
end his life, but attorney Donald Belsole, who is handling the case for the
widow, contends hospital personnel should have scrutinized Cillo more closely
for suicidal symptoms if they knew he willingly gave up his weapons.

The
hospital defendants, represented by attorneys Kenneth Fost and Michael Bubb,
contend their clients did all they could to properly evaluate Cillo, who
ultimately declined when asked whether he wanted to be admitted to Morristown
Memorial. Cillo was accompanied to the hospital by his wife of 15 years and his
father, the retired chief.

The lawsuit traces Cillo’s anxiety and
depressed state of mind back to Aug. 17, 2003, 11 days before his death. Working
a midnight shift, he handled a case of a Harding resident who shot his disabled
horse to try to end its suffering but didn’t kill the creature. Cillo responded
to the scene but failed to immediately seize the resident’s firearm or check
whether it was registered. He was chastised by his police chief for this lapse
and feared he would be fired. He grew anxious and couldn’t concentrate or sleep,
according to court records.

Cillo tried to socialize normally with his
wife and family for the next few days — going dancing and to a football game —
but also sought help through the Cop-to-Cop crisis hotline. He met with a
hotline social worker and his own family physician, who prescribed sleeping
pills and gave him samples of anti-depressant medications. Still feeling
confused and anxious on Aug. 27, he went to Morristown Memorial Hospital. One
physician gave him medication to calm him down and an appointment was set for
him to see a psychiatrist in a few days after he denied suicidal thoughts, court
records said.

On Aug. 28, the day he died, a hospital social worker
called Cillo at home to check on his welfare and he responded that he was doing
better. His wife brought the children to dental appointments, and upon returning
home, found a suicide note. She called police, who went to the home and
discovered Cillo in the basement.

438 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: SUICIDE OF POLICE OFFICER: MEDICAL CENTER SUED: NJ

Last two paragraphs read:  “Cillo tried to socialize
normally with his wife and family for the next few days — going dancing and to
a football game — but also sought help through the Cop-to-Cop crisis hotline.
He met with a hotline social worker and his own family physician, who
prescribed sleeping pills and gave him samples of anti-depressant
medications.
Still feeling confused and anxious on Aug.
27,
he went to Morristown Memorial Hospital. One physician gave him
medication to calm him down and an appointment was set for him to see a
psychiatrist in a few days after he denied suicidal thoughts, court records
said.”

“On Aug. 28, the day he died, a hospital social
worker called Cillo at home to check on his welfare and he responded that he was
doing better. His wife brought the children to dental appointments, and upon
returning home, found a suicide note. She called police, who went
to the home and discovered Cillo in the
basement.”

http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20090911/COMMUNITIES/309110001/1005/NEWS01/Wrongful+death+trial+begins+over+Harding+officer+s+suicide

Wrongful death trial begins over Harding officer‘s suicide

By Peggy Wright • Staff Writer • September 11, 2009

A civil trial
is set to start Monday on a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the widow of a
Harding police officer who hanged himself in 2003, a day after he was screened
at Morristown Memorial Hospital for suicidal ideations but not
admitted.

A jury of four men and four women was selected by Thursday
afternoon to hear the wrongful death//medical malpractice claims, and opening
trial statements are set to begin Monday before Superior Court Judge W. Hunt
Dumont in Morristown. At issue is whether the hospital, through a social worker,
registered nurse and psychiatrist named as defendants, was negligent and
breached a duty of care to Harding Officer James Cillo Jr. on Aug. 27,
2003.

Cillo, the 39-year-old son of retired Mendham Police Chief James
Cillo Sr., hanged himself in the basement of his Washington Township home. He
left his widow, Janet, and three daughters, who then were ages 11, 10 and
5.

A key issue in the case is whether hospital staff and its crisis
intervention workers who saw or evaluated Cillo on Aug. 27, 2003, were told that
he had given all his personal firearms to his father for safekeeping, and
stashed his service weapon at police headquarters. Cillo did not use a gun to
end his life, but attorney Donald Belsole, who is handling the case for the
widow, contends hospital personnel should have scrutinized Cillo more closely
for suicidal symptoms if they knew he willingly gave up his weapons.

The
hospital defendants, represented by attorneys Kenneth Fost and Michael Bubb,
contend their clients did all they could to properly evaluate Cillo, who
ultimately declined when asked whether he wanted to be admitted to Morristown
Memorial. Cillo was accompanied to the hospital by his wife of 15 years and his
father, the retired chief.

The lawsuit traces Cillo’s anxiety and
depressed state of mind back to Aug. 17, 2003, 11 days before his death. Working
a midnight shift, he handled a case of a Harding resident who shot his disabled
horse to try to end its suffering but didn’t kill the creature. Cillo responded
to the scene but failed to immediately seize the resident’s firearm or check
whether it was registered. He was chastised by his police chief for this lapse
and feared he would be fired. He grew anxious and couldn’t concentrate or sleep,
according to court records.

Cillo tried to socialize normally with his
wife and family for the next few days — going dancing and to a football game —
but also sought help through the Cop-to-Cop crisis hotline. He met with a
hotline social worker and his own family physician, who prescribed sleeping
pills and gave him samples of anti-depressant medications. Still feeling
confused and anxious on Aug. 27, he went to Morristown Memorial Hospital. One
physician gave him medication to calm him down and an appointment was set for
him to see a psychiatrist in a few days after he denied suicidal thoughts, court
records said.

On Aug. 28, the day he died, a hospital social worker
called Cillo at home to check on his welfare and he responded that he was doing
better. His wife brought the children to dental appointments, and upon returning
home, found a suicide note. She called police, who went to the home and
discovered Cillo in the basement.

418 total views, no views today