ANTIDEPRESSANT: MAN KILLS 2 PRO-ABORTIONISTS AFTER ANTIDEPRESSANT PROBLEMS – MI

Paragraph two reads:  “The man charged with murdering two
people in Owosso was battling depression and was
experiencing problems with his medication.

Paragraph seven reads:  “Drake is now back in jail after
being taken to the hospital over the weekend after a suicide attempt
i
n his cell.”

http://www.wilx.com/news/headlines/59342982.html

Posted: 12:48 PM Sep 15, 2009


Murder Suspect’s Family Speaks

The family of
Harlan Drake, the man charged with murdering two people in Owosso, releases a
statement about Friday’s killings.


The man charged with murdering two people in Owosso was
battling depression and was experiencing problems with his medication.

That’s according to a statement released by Harlan Drake’s
family.

His wife, mother and brother also don’t believe the
killings were in response to any grudges Drake may have had.

“We do not feel these tragic killings were premeditated, a
political statement regarding pro-life or pro-abortion factions, or out of a
grudge. We have been overwhelmed by sadness and emotion as we try to understand
what happened and why.”

Drake is charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of
James Pouillon and Mike Fuoss.
He was arrested at his home shortly after the
killings Friday morning.

Investigators say he was also planning on killing a third
person.

Drake is now back in jail after being taken to the
hospital over the weekend after a suicide attempt in his cell.

A service for Mike Fuoss was held in Owosso Tuesday
morning. He was then taken to Chelsea to be buried.

James pouillon was cremated Monday after a private funeral
service–however, there will be a public memorial for him at Owosso’s football
stadium, at 1pm Wednesday.
That’s Willman Field, on the corner of S. Dewey and Grover
street.

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DEPRESSION MED: Suicide Attempt: Unexpected: Permanent Brain Damage: Ne…

Paragraph 3 reads:  “Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain
damage
and severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead
Park Nursing Home and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his
daughter said.”

Paragraph 14 reads:  “According to Ms. Schortemeyer,
her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic car
aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his
children, and would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on
monthly visits when they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However,
Mr. Schortemeyer suffered from loneliness and was on medication for

depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=232464&town=Sag%20Harbor&n=Sag%20Harbor%20woman%20advocates%20for%20suicide%20prevention%20awareness

Sag Harbor woman advocates for suicide prevention awareness

By Bryan Finlayson
Sep 7, 09 10:32 AM

Two years ago in June, Ann Marie Schortemeyer, 25, was
driving home from work when Karen Mayer, her aunt, phoned with
news.

After an attempted suicide, Edwin Schortemeyer, Ann Marie’s father,
a veteran union plumber from Manorville, was in critical condition at John T.
Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.

Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain damage and
severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead Park Nursing Home
and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his daughter
said.

Now, Ms. Schortemeyer, who lives in Sag Harbor, is on a quiet
mission to spread awareness about suicide prevention on Long Island. She and her
fund-raising group, Eddie’s Angels, which has five members, collect donations
for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention [AFSP], a nationwide
organization that advocates research into the causes of suicide. To date, they
have collected $2,208 for the foundation.

Ms. Schortemeyer is also
participating in a suicide awareness walk at the Old Westbury Gardens in Old
Westbury on October 4, about a month after September 10, which is World Suicide

Prevention Day.

“I don’t think people realize how big a problem
depression and mental illness can be,” Ms. Schortemeyer said last week. “It can
affect anyone. I thought my dad was a happy man, and it turns out he had his own
battle with depression.”

The suicide or attempted suicide of a loved one
touches the lives of thousands of Americans each year, AFSC Executive Director
Bob Gebbia said. More than 33,000 people in the United States commit suicide a
year and close to a million attempt suicide, he said.

“If you take the
suicides and the attempted suicides and put them together, you can see that this
is a serious problem,” Mr. Gebbia said.

The Old Westbury Gardens walk is
expected to raise $125,000 for the AFSP to help fund education and research
grants for suicide prevention, Mr. Gebbia said. The money goes toward research
grants for institutions such as Columbia University, and will help fund
investigations into brain chemistry, psychosocial behavior and other symptoms
that can lead to suicide.

The walk in Old Westbury Gardens is one of 190
walks that will occur throughout the country this fall to raise awareness about

suicide prevention. Mr. Gebbia said more than 50,000 people are expected to
participate overall.

One of the foundation’s goals is to break the social
stigma that keeps people from discussing suicide and mental illness with
others.

Suicide is something that is not talked about, it is kept in the
shadows,” said Mr. Gebbia, noting that symptoms relating to suicide can be
treated with medication and therapy. “Suicide is the result of illness, not the
result of character flaws or a personal weakness.”

In Ms. Schortemeyer’s
experience, her father attempted suicide without giving any clear forewarning to
his family and friends. Neither Ms. Schortemeyer or her sister, Sharon, 23, of
Lindenhurst saw any warning signs leading up to the tragedy, Ms. Schortemeyer
said. But in retrospect, Ms. Schortemeyer said, there were “1,000 warning signs”
that her father was battling depression, yet “me and my sister didn’t even
notice it. It just seemed like a funny phase.”

According to Ms.
Schortemeyer, her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic
car aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his children, and
would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on monthly visits when
they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However, Mr. Schortemeyer
suffered from loneliness and was on medication for depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

His second marriage­he married about two weeks before he
attempted suicide­was tumultuous, by Ms. Schortemeyer’s account. “He married
a woman he didn’t know too well,” Ms. Schortemeyer said.

In
conversations, Mr. Schortemeyer often complained of money problems and of his
daughters being so far away from home. In 2007, Sharon was attending college in
Florida and Ann Marie was working as an administrative assistant for a
construction company in Wisconsin.

“He just seemed to be complaining a
lot about credit card bills and the cost of maintaining a home,” Ms.
Schortemeyer said. “I thought it wasn’t anything that big.”

The night
before Mr. Schortemeyer hung himself, he called Ms. Schortemeyer in Wisconsin
and left a voice message to thank her for a Father’s Day card. “He said he
misses me and to please call him soon,” said Ms. Schortemeyer, who reached the
message the following day.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 77 Year Old Man Commits Suicide: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: Another example of just how truly amazing these antidepressants are! In growing up I do not recall ever hearing of someone this age committing suicide, much less a more violent suicide as we see with SSRI antidepressants! Now we not only have suicides and violent ones, but we have horribly violent murder/suicides in this age group! It is all so very sickening!!
Second paragraph reads:  “Bernard Jeenes, 77, was found dead in his kitchen, in Cayman Close, Popley, Basingstoke, on June 7, after taking an overdose of anti-depressants and hanging himself.”

http://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/news/4558306.Suicidal_man__let_down__by_system/

Suicidal man ‘let down’ by system

12:30pm Friday 21st August 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your say »

A GRIEVING son said his father should have been cared for at a Basingstoke psychiatric hospital to stop him from killing himself.

Bernard Jeenes, 77, was found dead in his kitchen, in Cayman Close, Popley, Basingstoke, on June 7, after taking an overdose of anti-depressants and hanging himself.

His son Mark, who found his body, told an inquest into his death that his father had begged to be admitted to the mental health unit at Parklands Hospital after a suicide attempt the week before he died.

Now he is calling for changes. Mr Jeenes, a 33-year-old decorator from Barbel Avenue, in Riverdene, told the inquest at Alton magistrates court: “I feel like my father has been let down and if he got the help he wanted he would still be here today.”

He said a week before he died, his father was admitted to Basingstoke hospital after taking an overdose of anti-depressants. He then asked to be transferred to neighbouring Parklands psychiatric hospital.

He told the coroner: “That should have got alarm bells ringing, but the doctor just said he would be better off at home. My father said he wanted to kill himself.”

He said his father had emerged “a new man” after a spell at Parklands in 2002.

However, the dead man’s psychiatric nurse, Chris Dale, told the inquest Mr Jeenes had been referred by a GP after he had phoned Parklands directly.

He said: “I saw him several times before his death and he didn’t tell me about wanting to go to Parklands. He mentioned he had some suicidal thoughts but that he had no plan or intent to take his life. He told me he wanted to avoid Parklands, and do things on his own.

“The last time I saw him, he was more positive.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, North East Hampshire coroner, Andrew Bradley, said: “Clearly what Mr Jeenes was sharing with his son was different from what he was sharing with Chris Dale.

“The concerns were there, the bells were ringing but the assessment pushed him out the Basingstoke hospital door.”

After the inquest, a spokesman for Hampshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, which runs Parklands Hospital, said staff who knew him had been deeply saddened by the death of Mr Jeenes.

An initial review into the circumstances had concluded that the right clinical decisions were made.

The spokesman added: “A further more detailed review is being carried out. It is important to note that the coroner, in full possession of all the facts, did not make any recommendations for the trust to implement.”

He said if a clinician wanted a patient admitted, a bed would be found.

Mr Jeenes’ story has come to light just weeks after The Gazette reported the inquest of Terry Thomas, aged 54, of Kenilworth Road, Winklebury, who died after jumping from a bridge on Ringway West A340 on April 1.

His widow Jane told an inquest he had been turned away from Parklands Hospital the day before his death, despite a failed suicide attempt.

Following that story, Gazette reader Hailey Newton Roast, aged 35, of Kings Furlong Centre, off Wessex Close, Basingstoke, contacted the newsdesk to speak of her experience.

She said: “I have manic depression and have tried to commit suicide a few times. Each time I was told I didn’t meet the criteria to be admitted to Parklands.

“The mental health services here are terrible and I’ve written several times to complain.”

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DEPRESSION MED: Man Who Killed Pro-Abortionists Was Having Problems with…

Paragraph two reads: “The man charged with murdering two people in Owosso was battling depression and was experiencing problems with his medication.”

Paragraph seven reads: “Drake is now back in jail after being taken to the hospital over the weekend after a suicide attempt in his cell.”

http://www.wilx.com/news/headlines/59342982.html

Posted: 12:48 PM Sep 15, 2009
Murder Suspect’s Family Speaks

The family of Harlan Drake, the man charged with murdering two people in Owosso, releases a statement about Friday’s killings.
The man charged with murdering two people in Owosso was battling depression and was experiencing problems with his medication.
That’s according to a statement released by Harlan Drake’s family.
His wife, mother and brother also don’t believe the killings were in response to any grudges Drake may have had.
“We do not feel these tragic killings were premeditated, a political statement regarding pro-life or pro-abortion factions, or out of a grudge. We have been overwhelmed by sadness and emotion as we try to understand what happened and why.”
Drake is charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of James Pouillon and Mike Fuoss.
He was arrested at his home shortly after the killings Friday morning.
Investigators say he was also planning on killing a third person.
Drake is now back in jail after being taken to the hospital over the weekend after a suicide attempt in his cell.
A service for Mike Fuoss was held in Owosso Tuesday morning. He was then taken to Chelsea to be buried.
James pouillon was cremated Monday after a private funeral service–however, there will be a public memorial for him at Owosso’s football stadium, at 1pm Wednesday.
That’s Willman Field, on the corner of S. Dewey and Grover street.

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Zoloft Suicide Attempts and Still Rebuilding My Life

“I will never trust such a self-serving inhumane profession as psychiatry.”

 

Dear Ann Blake-Tracy,

This is my story…if you decide to publish it online or anywhere else, please keep my e-mail, name and ID confidential. I am filing a complaint against my doctor with the state regulatory board and hope someday to find some closure on what was absolutely the most traumatic, horrific experience of my life. Thanks for reading!

First, I should tell you about myself before Zoloft. I have always enjoyed working and being around people. My favorite things are having dinner parties, going to art shows and theatre events. I have never collected unemployment or accepted any type of handout in my life and I take a great deal of pride in both my self-sufficiency and sociability. When I experienced some depression in my late 20’s it confused me. I felt like I wasn’t myself and didn’t really know what to do. So after trying everything from exercise, acupuncture, St. John’s and so forth, I did, for the first time in my 28-year old life, what I thought was the responsible thing to do: I sought “help”.

After six months of psychotherapy, the therapist told me my problem felt “organic” to her meaning not related to psychological problems. I was subsequently referred to a psychiatrist who prescribed ativan and told me I might be unipolar depressive, dysthymic, or possibly bipolar. Actively suicidal after considering what the effect of this diagnosis would have on my life and long-term treatment, I was hospitalized and prescribed Zoloft (100mg/day). Within a month on Zoloft I had experienced my first suicide attempt. This happened after I spent a six hour period running down the street naked underneath a fur coat in the pouring ran without realizing the ridiculousness of what I was doing because I was feeling high all the time, taking ativan liberally, and experiencing intense alcohol cravings. My behavior alienated my family and friends and ruined numerous lifelong alliances I had prior to Zoloft. Everyone thought I had gone off the deep end, including me to some degree. I trusted my doctor completely at that point when he said I had a “chemical imbalance” and that I would take prescribed drugs for “the rest of my life”. After a series of numerous mood-stabilizers and other drugs used to treat manic-depressives I was not doing any better. In fact, my situation had only continues to deteriorate. It was a year later before I started to say to my doctor, “hey! You know what? I’m not getting any better and in fact I’m getting worse!” He couldn’t have agreed less. Said I didn’t have any “insight”.

After frantic calls to his office begging for help to get off the drugs then trying (unsuccessfully) to go off the drugs without his help, I suffered one more suicide attempt. Enough was enough. I knew it was the drugs and didn’t care if no one believed me. I went from gainfully employed, intelligent and self-sufficient to reckless, unemployable, brain-dead and dependent all in a matter of two years. All I can say is, it is your life to lose. If you choose to take Zoloft then realize that your life could seriously be put in danger – and nobody, not even your doctor will be able to save you if all hell breaks loose because he/she doesn’t even really know what the long-term side effects are.

The good news is that I have been off the drugs since and knowing what I know now will never trust such a self-serving inhumane profession as psychiatry. My doctors only stood to make more money by keeping me in the prison of psych drugs so there was little incentive for him provide alternative healing or to try and get me off the drugs he prescribed until it is too late. (By the way he never admitted that he failed to monitor my side effects or reported any of my suicide attempts to the FDA).

Until doctors admit failing their patients miserably on this issue and take strides to prevent drug companies from propagandizing drugs and myths about depression and its treatment, then more and more people like me are going to start coming out of the woodwork. If you care about your families and loved ones please get the word out! SSRI’s can be extremely dangerous and can even be deadly. Take it from me, I know from first hand experience and was lucky enough to survive the ordeal, however many are not as lucky as me.

 

3/14/2002

This is Survivor Story number 39.
Total number of stories in current database is 48

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Suicide after One Month on Celexa and lorazipam

“I do wonder just how often suicide, attempted suicides and murders are committed by people who are taking SSRI drugs.”

 

My son, 31 years of age, was prescribed Celexa 20mg/day and lorazipam .5mg as needed, July 22, 1999, on first visit without any form of physical examination and with only a short interview by a case worker and psychiatrist. He was seen on August 4, at which time the doctor said he was better. On August 21, 1999, he committed suicide. I cannot scientifically prove Celexa was the cause. I only know what others and myself know about him and his behavior. We are convinced the medication definitely increased his symptoms of frequent mood swings, anxiety, fear, inability to sleep, panic, anger, inability to concentrate.

Because of my son’s death (suicide) while taking Celexa, I have become aware of the habit of doctors prescribing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors TOO OFTEN, and in my opinion, WITHOUT SUFFICIENT REGARD TO THE DANGEROUS SIDE EFFECTS AND/OR OTHER HEALTH CONDITIONS WHICH COULD BE THE CAUSE OF THE DEPRESSION. I do wonder just how often suicide, attempted suicides and murders are committed by people who are taking SSRI drugs.

On 9-17-99, I phoned Adverse Drug Reactions Medical Inquiries and was transferred to New Jersey Drug Safety. I spoke with Christine Casilana (uncertain of correct spelling), of Forest Pharmaceuticals. She took all pertinent information and assured me the report would be sent to the FDA. I specifically asked about the statement in the package insert that reads, “frequent adverse events are those occurring on one or more occasions in at least 1/100 patients”. Under “Psychiatric Disorders” those listed as frequent among others noted are: “impaired concentration, depression, aggravated depression, suicide attempt”. Christine explained that frequent – the 1/100 figure – meant that AT LEAST ONE (but the actual number could be higher than just one) out of 100 made a suicide attempt on Celexa.

One is a large percent when indicating DEATH, especially if it is YOUR loved one. I don’t mean to sound angry, I just want someone to pay attention. It is hard to believe this drug is given out so readily. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are prescribed far to freely and without sufficient supervision of the patient AND with some doctors, without adequate examination.

 

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 43.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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