ZOLOFT: MULTIPLE LAWSUITS FILED FOR MULTIPLE BIRTH DEFECTS

Zoloft-mother-and-child[1]

ZOLOFT: MULTIPLE LAWSUITS FILED FOR MULTIPLE BIRTH DEFECTS

I do not believe it is clear to many people how serious these SSRI birth defect cases really are. This is to give you an idea of just how serious the birth defect cases are going against these drug companies…

Child was born with multiple birth defects…The complainant states that she took Zoloft throughout her pregnancy after it was prescribed by her treating physicians. She gave birth to a child with numerous congenital birth defects. The baby has been diagnosed with spina bifida, scoliosis, vater syndrome, tracheoesophageal fistula, and mitral valve regurgitation.

CASE #1

New Jersey Woman Files Zoloft Birth Defects Lawsuit

Perry Larkin | November 6th, 2012 | Posted in Zoloft Lawsuits

A New Jersey woman filed a new Zoloft litigation on October 17, 2012 seeking damages against manufacturer Pfizer, Inc. According to the filing the woman took the antidepressant Zoloft during her pregnancy and it caused multiple birth defects in her newborn son.

The case was filed in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Foley Square). She makes complaints of product liability, defective design, failure to warn, negligence and misrepresentation and seeks punitive and actual damages.

Zoloft accused of showing “willful disregard” to informing the public of risks

According to studies, Zoloft has long been linked to birth defects in newborns. In spite of FDA regulations that the new medical evidence requires Pfizer to update the warning label, the company has yet to do so.

The plaintiff’s attorney states that the company showed a willful disregard to informing the medical community and public of the risk of congenital birth defects due to Zoloft and this caused permanent harm to his client’s son. The label still fails to warn of the dangers and risks of congenital birth defects of Zoloft if it’s taken during pregnancy.

The plaintiff claims that her baby suffered from the following side effects of Zoloft: spina bifida, vater syndrome, clubfoot and other related defects.

Pfizer alleged to have known of side effects as early as 2007

The lawsuit alleges that Pfizer carelessly marketed the product and failed to provide sufficient warning as to the possible side effects to pregnant women. This case joins other designated cases for the pilot program of the district court, which aims to address complex civil cases.

The complaint says that in 2007, Pfizer knew that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like Zoloft doubled the risk of septal heart defects in babies who were born to mothers who took the medication. In studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine, it indicates that a four-fold increase in heart defects was connected to pregnant women using Zoloft during their first trimester. Other studies showed that using the medication while pregnant is also linked to a higher occurrence of heart malformation.

Child was born with multiple birth defects

The complainant states that she took Zoloft throughout her pregnancy after it was prescribed by her treating physicians. She gave birth to a child with numerous congenital birth defects. The baby has been diagnosed with spina bifida, scoliosis, vater syndrome, tracheoesophageal fistula, and mitral valve regurgitation.

The plaintiff seeks compensation for medical costs, as well as punitive and special damages.

injurylawyer-news.com/2012/11/new-jersey-woman-files-zoloft-birth-defects-lawsuit/

CASE #2

Zoloft Caused Daughter’s Birth Defects, Tennessee Parents Claim in Lawsuit

Tracy Ray | October 24th, 2012 | Posted in Zoloft Lawsuits

In a lawsuit against Pfizer that was recently added to the Zoloft MDL, parents Michael and Shana Reid of Tennessee charge that their daughter was born with birth defects resulting from Zoloft. The Reids originally filed their lawsuit on June 8, 2012, in the Court of Common Pleas in Philadelphia County, and the case was transferred to the Zoloft MDL in the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania, on August 16, 2012.

Baby needed surgery for life-threatening defects

According to the Reid’s lawsuit, Shana Reid was prescribed Zoloft by her physician during her pregnancy. She read the drug’s warning label, but did not see anything about birth defects, so she trusted that the antidepressant was safe to use while pregnant. Had she been warned about the risk of birth defects resulting from Zoloft, she would not have taken it during her pregnancy, she states in the lawsuit.

The Reid’s baby was born on October 14, 2004 with life-threatening congenital birth defects, the lawsuit states. As a result, the child has undergone corrective surgery and is likely to require further surgeries in future.

Plaintiffs accuse Pfizer of failure to warn mothers of Zoloft’s risks

The Reid’s lawsuit alleges that Pfizer was aware of the risk of side effects after taking Zoloft, but failed to adequately warn the public or the medical community. Their lawsuit charges that Pfizer’s marketing and advertising for Zoloft misled pregnant women and their doctors by giving inaccurate or misleading information about the danger Zoloft poses to a fetus when the drug is taken during pregnancy.

The lawsuit bring counts of failure to warn, design defect, fraud, negligence, gross negligence, negligent design, and breach of warranties. The plaintiffs are seeking compensation in excess of $75,000 in damages.

FDA issued warning about Zoloft birth defects

The FDA issued a warning in July 2006 stating that studies had shown that babies born to mothers who took Zoloft or other SSRI antidepressants during pregnancy were six times more likely to be born with PPHN than babies born to mothers who did not take antidepressants.
The following year, a 2007 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that women who took Zoloft during the first trimester had double the risk of giving birth to an infant with heart defects, compared to those who did not take antidepressants.

injurylawyer-news.com/2012/10/zoloft-caused-daughters-birth-defects-tennessee-parents-claim-in-lawsuit/

CASE #3

A Lawsuit Alleging Birth Defects From Zoloft is Filed in Pennsylvania
Perry Larkin | October 15th, 2012 | Posted in Zoloft Lawsuits
On September 10, 2012, a new lawsuit alleging birth defects from the use of Zoloft while pregnant was filed on behalf of ten plaintiffs by Zoloft attorneys. The case, Lentz et. Al. v. Pfizer Inc., was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and alleges that the antidepressant Zoloft (sertraline) is responsible for the birth defects in their children.

This lawsuit joins the increasing number of plaintiffs who are seeking compensation for the alleged problems as a result of the medication.

Pfizer is accused of knowing of the risk of birth defects and failing to alert the public

The lawsuit alleges that Pfizer knew of the possibility of birth defects from preclinical and published studies and took no action to properly study the drug and its aftereffects. In addition, they chose not to publish these studies due to the revelation of increased risks with the drug. The manufacturer is accused of concealing, suppressing the results, and failing to warn consumers of the potential dangers. Pfizer continues to deny these accusations.

Many side effects from Zoloft can affect the heart, the gastrointestinal system, and cranial malformations

The children were born between 1998 and 2011. A correlation was demonstrated in studies between 2007 and 2009 that indicated the increased risk of birth defects when women take Zoloft while pregnant, but the plaintiffs were unaware of these studies. The plaintiffs claim that if they’d known of the risks, they never would have taken the drug.
Some of the side effects resulting from Zoloft use described in the lawsuit include gastrointestinal problems such as anteriorly displaced anus and omphalocele; heart defects such as right-sided aortic arch, patent ductus arteriosus, cleft mitral valve, transposition of the great arteries, atrial and ventrical septal defects, anomalous pulmonary venous return, and aotrtic stenosis; and craniofacial malformations such as cleft lip and palate, and multiple-suture craniosynostosis.

Pfizer’s safety information posted online doesn’t mention birth defects
On their website, Pfizer has posted “Important Safety Information” about possible complications of Zoloft, but doesn’t specifically mention birth defects. The site does state that “[w]omen who are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or who are breastfeeding should not take any antidepressant without consulting their doctor,” but to date doesn’t acknowledge any risk of birth defects, nor does it indicate that Zoloft poses any risk to a pregnancy that other antidepressants don’t also pose.

injurylawyer-news.com/2012/10/a-lawsuit-alleging-birth-defects-from-zoloft-is-filed-in-pennsylvania/

CASE #4

Zoloft Drugmaker Blamed for Child Death

Elise Kramer | October 11th, 2012 | Posted in Zoloft Lawsuits

A New York couple has filed a lawsuit against Zoloft drug maker Pfizer, claiming that the antidepressant Zoloft is responsible for the birth defects experienced by their deceased son. The lawsuit was filed on August 17, 2012, in the United States’ District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, where the current Zoloft multidistrict litigation case is taking place. Jessica and Shawn Coon are claiming that Zoloft was responsible for the side effects experienced by their child, as Jessica took the medication during her pregnancy; they claim that they were not adequately informed of potential side effects associated with the medication at the time.

Negligence claimed by couple

The plaintiffs claim that the deceased minor, known as J.A.C., was born with congenital heart defects caused by birth defects after Zoloft use. He passed away just one month after he was born at the West Chester Medical Center in New York. They claim that because of Pfizer’s negligence and misrepresentation, Jessica Coon continued to take the SSRI drug Zoloft while she was pregnant with her child, which resulted in the birth defects he suffered and in his subsequent death.

The lawsuit claims that Pfizer and its subsidiaries, including Greenstone LLC, did not demonstrate reasonable care in the production, marketing, and distribution of their antidepressant, which caused a number of patients to suffer from birth defects as a result of the drug’s use by pregnant mothers. A number of studies have shown that Zoloft can be linked to an increased risk in birth defects, including PPHN and congenital heart disorders, which can be fatal in serious cases.

Numerous birth defects associated with antidepressant

The growing number of plaintiffs who have chosen to file a birth defects lawsuit related to Zoloft indicates the serious concern about birth defects related to the drug. Studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine revealed that infants born to women taking SSRI medications such as Zoloft were 50 percent more likely to develop heart defects and other serious heart problems.

injurylawyer-news.com/2012/10/zoloft-drugmaker-blamed-for-child-death/

About the Author: Ann Blake Tracy is the author of PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA? –OUR SEROTONIN NIGHTMARE!, and the director of the International Coalition For Drug Awareness [www.drugawareness.org]. She has testified before the FDA and has testified as an expert in legal cases involving serotonergic medications since 1992.

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Effexor & Alcohol: Female teacher found not criminally responsible for sex with male teen student

Paragraphs six through nine read:  “According to a statement of facts agreed upon by the Crown and defence, during the summer of 2008 Francoeur was mistakenly diagnosed with major depression and prescribed an anti-depressant drug known as Effexor. During the next few months, she underwent a radical change.”

“Francoeur actually has bipolar disorder rather than depression ­ and Effexor is known to escalate the  ‘manic’ phase experienced by people with bipolarism, which is characterized by extreme feelings of elation, euphoria, racing thoughts, inability to sleep and difficulty appreciating consequences, court heard.”

“Although she had previously been a very light drinker, Francoeur started using alcohol excessively, Piche told court. She spent money in careless ways, went days without sleep and ate irregularly, losing significant amounts of weight. She talked excessively and tookuncharacteristic shortcuts in caring for her daughters, who were five and seven years old.”

“The changes concerned her family members, who sent a letter to Francoeur’s doctor about the situation.”
———————–

SSRIStories.com & Drugawareness.org note:  There are now 15 cases on SSRI Stories of women school teachers molesting their minor male students.  Bill O’Reilly of the TV talk show, “The Factor” said they are receiving one case report every week. SSRI Stories does not have the resources to investigate these reports in regard to antidepressant use.

SSRIStories.com & Drugawareness.org note: Another additional note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and can cause alcohol abuse. (Check out the SSRIs & Alcohol article at www.drugawareness.org for additional information on alcohol cravings.) Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressantin the human body. 
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Teacher+found+criminally+responsible+with+teen+student/4227894/story.html
Effexor & Alcohol: Female teacher found not criminally responsible for sex with male teen student
 
By Lori Coolican, Postmedia News February 4, 2011
 
A Saskatchewan teacher has been found not criminally responsible for having sex with a 15-year-old former student.

Photograph by: Joe Raedle, Getty Images
SASKATOON ­ Family and supporters of a teacher from Shell Lake, Sask., sighed with relief in a Saskatoon courtroom Friday after a judge declared her not criminally responsible, due to mental illness, for a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old former student.

Michelle Francoeur was in an extreme “manic state” and lacked the capacity to make rational decisions when she agreed to have sex with the teen boy on several occasions between Sept. 1 and Nov. 20, 2008, Queen’s Bench Justice Duane Koch found.

“The criminal law does not want to punish people who were suffering a mental disorder at the time of the act,” Crown prosecutor Mitch Piche said outside court.

Francoeur was charged with sexual touching, sexual exploitation and sexual assault against the teen, whose identity is protected by a publication ban, after RCMP received a complaint in December 2008.

She was suspended from her job at the Shell Lake school while the case was before the court.

According to a statement of facts agreed upon by the Crown and defence, during the summer of 2008 Francoeur was mistakenly diagnosed with major depression and prescribed an anti-depressant drug known as Effexor. During the next few months, she underwent a radical change.

Francoeur actually has bipolar disorder rather than depression ­ and Effexor is known to escalate the “manic” phase experienced by people with bipolarism, which is characterized by extreme feelings of elation, euphoria, racing thoughts, inability to sleep and difficulty appreciating consequences, court heard.

Although she had previously been a very light drinker, Francoeur started using alcohol excessively, Piche told court. She spent money in careless ways, went days without sleep and ate irregularly, losing significant amounts of weight. She talked excessively and took uncharacteristic shortcuts in caring for her daughters, who were five and seven years old.

The changes concerned her family members, who sent a letter to Francoeur’s doctor about the situation.

The boy had been in Francoeur’s class the previous school year, but no longer attended the school where she taught. They had exchanged text messages once that summer and one night in October he sent her a flirtatious text that resulted in their first sexual encounter, Piche said.

Several more incidents followed, until the boy’s mother discovered the situation.

Defence lawyer Aaron Fox noted Franceour would likely not have been charged with a crime had the incidents happened six months earlier, before changes to the Criminal Code raised the legal age of consent for sexual activity from 14 to 16.

Shell Lake is 175 kilometres north of Saskatoon.

lcoolican@thestarphoenix.com

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EFFEXOR: Man Smashes 29 TV Sets at Wal-Mart: Georgia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Just what is it with connection between antidepressant use and
baseball bats?!! Must be the same as it is for antidepressants and AK47’s!
Doctors could have a side business selling both baseball bats and AK47’s with
the prescriptions they write for these drugs because as the users begin to
suffer the adverse reactions they buy one or the other or both! Has anyone
caught on yet? How many more cases will it take?
On another note WHY on earth are they charging this fellow in
one crime with 29 counts of criminal damage to property???? A charge for each of
the TV sets separately when it was one crime?! That is
ridiculous!!!
_____________________________________
Last sentence reads:  “Police found a bottle of
Effexor XR, an anti-depressant
, in Strellis’s
possession.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/11/westley-strellis-walmart_n_458652.html

Westley Strellis, Business
News

A Georgia man went on a rampage yesterday

at a Walmart outside of Atlanta, smashing dozens of flat-screen televisions with
a baseball bat he found in the store.

The man, 23-year-old Westley
Strellis, bashed in 29 flat-screen televisions worth $22,000, reports the

Atlanta Journal Constitution. He was charged
with a whopping 29 counts of criminal damage to property.

Strellis
invoked his Fifth Amendment right to stay mum, so his motive remains a mystery.
According to

the police
report
, when officers arrived on the scene, Strellis was
sitting in an aisle in the store’s electronics department. When approached, he
held out his wrists, signaling for the officer to handcuff him. Police found a
bottle of Effexor XR, an anti-depressant, in Strellis’s
possession.

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SSRIs: Withdrawal is Sometimes More Severe Than the Original Problem.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Although this article at least acknowledges the problem with
rebound where the initial problem seems like nothing compared to the withdrawal

effects and rebound effects, it does not address the seriousness of withdrawal.
What is described here sounds like a piece of cake compared to what so many go
through in antidepressant withdrawal!

The FDA warns that abrupt withdrawal can possibly lead to
suicide, hostility or psychosis – generally a manic psychosis. Those are hardly

the milder withdrawal effects mentioned below! ALWAYS withdraw very, very
gradually so that you only have to deal with these milder withdrawal
effects.

________________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “It seems hard to imagine that

stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat.
Sometimes the reaction is actually
more severe than the original problem.

Paragraph nine
reads:  “Another class of medications that can trigger withdrawal

includes antidepressants such as Celexa, Effexor, Paxil and
Pristiq.
Many people who quit these drugs experience  ‘brain
zaps,’  dizziness or the sensation of having their  ‘head in a
blender,’ along with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.”

http://www.sgvtribune.com/living/ci_13913666

Rebound symptoms may keep many on drugs

Posted: 12/02/2009 10:46:51 PM PST

When people take
certain drugs for anxiety, insomnia, heartburn or headache, they are trying to
ease their discomfort. They surely don’t intend to make things worse, yet
sometimes that is what happens when they go off the medication.

It seems
hard to imagine that stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat. Sometimes the reaction is actually more severe than the

original problem.

Doctors occasionally have difficulty recognizing this
rebound effect, because they may assume that the patients’ difficulties are
simply the return of the original symptoms.

During the 1970s, Valium and
Librium were two of the most commonly prescribed drugs in America. These popular
tranquilizers eased anxiety and helped people sleep.

When they were
stopped abruptly, however, some people developed withdrawal symptoms that
included severe anxiety, agitation, poor concentration, nightmares and insomnia.
Many doctors just couldn’t imagine that such symptoms might persist for weeks,
since these drugs are gone from the body within several days. Nowadays, the

withdrawal syndrome from benzodiazepines like Ativan (lorazepam), Valium
(diazepam) and Xanax (alprazolam) is well-recognized.

Other drugs also
may cause unexpected withdrawal problems. Quite a few people have trouble
stopping certain heartburn drugs. Here’s an example from one reader: “I have
been taking Protonix for heartburn for about six months. After learning of

potential ill effects from long-term use, I tried to stop taking it. After
about a week, I had to start taking it again due to severe heartburn – the
rebound effect, I suppose. I asked my provider how I should go about
discontinuing its use, but she did not know.”

Many physicians assumed
that severe heartburn upon discontinuation was the reappearance of the

underlying digestive problem. In the case of medications such as Aciphex,
Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix, however, an innovative study
demonstrated that perfectly healthy people suffer significant heartburn symptoms
they’d never had before when they go off one of these drugs after two months of
taking them (Gastroenterology, July 2009).

In addition to
benzodiazepines and heartburn medicines, other drugs can cause this type of
rebound phenomenon. Decongestant nasal sprays are notorious for causing rebound
congestion if used longer than three or four days. We have heard from people who
got hooked and used them several times a day for years.

Another class of
medications that can trigger withdrawal includes antidepressants such as Celexa,
Effexor, Paxil and Pristiq. Many people who quit these drugs experience “brain
zaps,” dizziness or the sensation of having their “head in a blender,” along
with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.

All these
medications have two things in common: Stopping suddenly triggers a rebound with
symptoms similar to those of the original problem, and providers have very
little information on how to ease their patients’ withdrawal difficulties.

Patients deserve a warning before starting a drug that may be difficult
to stop. Providers should learn how to help patients stop a medication when they
no longer need it.

Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds
a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert. Write to them in
care of their Web site: www.PeoplesPharmacy.com

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EFFEXOR: Police Officer Becomes Aggressive With Captain: Suit: NJ

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Czech’s report indicated Ruroede
suffers from a seizure disorder and as a consequence takes
Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone, all of which
have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also claimed
that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk of over
aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/78389717.html

Former officer‘s suit gets a court date
Thursday, December 3, 2009


Community News (Lodi Edition)
STAFF WRITER

A former police
lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go before the court
early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against the borough, the
police department and the mayor and council earlier this year following his
termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec. 9, 2008.
Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County Superior
Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede was fired
from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert Czech, Esq. of
Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided “untruthful
responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions of March 23,
2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt. George Egbert.
Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate, withheld information,
failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and handled firearms while
unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological evaluation determined
that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit, Ruroede seeks to have
Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police department and pay
lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges against Ruroede stem
from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney Station bar in East
Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at the bar prior to the
fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm during the course of a
verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that Ruroede lifted him “by the
jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off the ground.”

In
the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a derogatory remark about a
female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert
grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued in the manner he
did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s testimony,
according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert called
both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a

seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path the
mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John Boppert
of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert Wunsch,
was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

A
former police lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go
before the court early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against
the borough, the police department and the mayor and council earlier this year
following his termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec.
9, 2008. Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County
Superior Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede
was fired from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert
Czech, Esq. of Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided
“untruthful responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions
of March 23, 2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt.
George Egbert. Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate,
withheld information, failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and
handled firearms while unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological
evaluation determined that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit,
Ruroede seeks to have Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police
department and pay lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges
against Ruroede stem from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney
Station bar in East Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at
the bar prior to the fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm
during the course of a verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that
Ruroede lifted him “by the jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off
the ground.”

In the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a
derogatory remark about a female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the
bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued
in the manner he did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s
testimony, according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert
called both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a
seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance
Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path
the mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John
Boppert of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert
Wunsch, was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

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Effexor: Insomnia & Night Sweats + Withdrawal & Brain Zaps: Peoples Pharmacy

Paragraph two reads:  “After cutting my dose in
half,
I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and
pressure in my ears.”

http://www2.timesdispatch.com/rtd/lifestyles/local_other/article/S-PHAR06_20090902-190006/290023/

Q:I have been taking Effexor XR for two
years. At first I was pleased that it relieved the anxiety, depression and
excessive worrying I had been suffering. Then I began experiencing insomnia and

night sweats and decided to taper off this antidepressant.

After cutting
my dose in half, I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and pressure in
my ears.

Answer: Many people find that antidepressants such as Effexor
(venlafaxine), Cymbalta (duloxetine), Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine)
and Zoloft (sertraline) are helpful for depression. But there can be a dark
side.

Stopping this type of drug can lead to withdrawal symptoms such as
dizziness, headaches, insomnia, anxiety, sweating, visual disturbances and
difficulty concentrating. Many people complain of shocklike sensations in their
head (brainzaps” or “shivers”).

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Mother of Columbine killer tells of horror 10 yrs after massacre

Michael Moore obtained a copy of Ann Blake-Tracy’s book at the premiere of his movie Bowling for Columbine. Now listen to his bold statement about what really did cause Columbine.


SEE FULL VIDEO Click here

INFO ON OTHER SCHOOL SHOOTINGS

Mark Taylors Site.
NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: Michael Moore, after reviewing all
the data on Columbine in making his movie, Bowling for Columbine, made his
message clear in the new movie The Drugging of Our Children about what he NOW
believes caused Columbine. Click on his picture to view his video
statement at www.drugawareness.org

In all of these articles out yesterday in the news covering the story by
Dylan’s mother there is STILL no mention of any medication use on Dylan’s part.
Yet we have a friend of Dylan’s who came forward claiming to have been helping
him withdraw from both Zoloft and Paxil.
But the coroner claims they found nothing in his system (I could go into
why that report is suspect but will save that for another time).
IF there really was nothing in his system, was Dylan in withdrawal from his
SSRIs at that point? We know that withdrawal can produce that same extreme out
of character violence since the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) is more
prevalent in the withdrawal from these drugs than while on them. And yet of
those being diagnosed with RBD a staggering 86% were taking an antidepressant!
(To learn more about RBD read my FDA testimony on comedian Phil Hartman and is
wife’s Zoloft-induced murder/suicide – a classic case of RBD also found posted
at www.drugawareness.org.)
And if Dylan had been taking antidepressants were they prescribed to
Dylan? If not, where was he getting them? (Let us point out that anyone can
obtain these drugs easily. They have been sold in the streets since the early
90’s to be used recreationally and samples can be found ANYWHERE. Someone just
let me know that they found a bottle of Effexor in a shoe at a second
hand store!) Was a friend sharing their prescription? It happens regularly
from reports I get from kids. Were either of his parents taking one that he was
using for himself?
Years ago I was called in on a case of a 19 year old who was staying with a
married couple where the wife had been prescribed Zoloft and did not like how it
made her feel. She stopped taking it and placed in on top of the fridge. So when
the young man started feeling a little down he remembered the pills were for
depression and were suppose to help you feel better. So he took a couple, waited
a couple of hours and took more because he still was not feeling any better.
Then again took more a little later expecting to feel better right away. After

about five pills he recalls nothing about stabbing a man over 100 times with a
screwdriver.

Mother
of Columbine killer tells of horror 10 years after massacre

•Susan Klebold says she is haunted by school killings
•’I cannot look at a child without thinking about it’

Columbine High School student Dylan Klebold

Dylan
Klebold pictured in the 1999 Columbine High School yearbook. Photograph:
Reuters/© Ho New

The
mother of one of the two teenagers who murdered a dozen fellow students and a
teacher in the massacre at Columbine high school has broken a decade of

silence to say that she is unable to look at another child without thinking
about the horror and suffering her son caused.

Susan
Klebold, whose son Dylan and another youth, Eric Harris, hunted down pupils at
the Colorado school with shotguns, a semi-automatic pistol and a rifle before
killing themselves, has described her trauma over her son’s actions.

“For
the rest of my life, I will be haunted by the horror and anguish Dylan caused,”
she wrote in O, The Oprah Magazine. “I cannot look at a child in a grocery
store or on the street without thinking about how my son’s schoolmates spent the
last moments of their lives. Dylan changed everything I believed about myself,
about God, about family and about love.”

Neither
the Klebold nor Harris families has spoken about the massacre, in which 21
students were also wounded.

Klebold
recounts how the last word she heard from her son was a gruff goodbye as he
rushed out of the door early on the morning of the killings in April 1999.

“I
was getting dressed for work when I heard Dylan bound down the stairs and open
the front door … I poked my head out of the bedroom. ‘Dyl?’ All he said was
‘Bye.’ … His voice had sounded sharp. I figured he was mad because he’d had
to get up early to give someone a lift to class. I had no idea that I had just
heard his voice for the last time,” she said.

Dylan
Klebold was headed to make a final video with Harris to say goodbye and
apologise to their families before they drove to the school to plant bombs,
which failed to detonate, and to carry through their plan to kill their fellow
students.

After
the killings, the authorities said there were indications that the two youths
were disturbed and hints of the looming catastrophe. Harris’s blog included
instructions on how to make explosives and, later, angry denunciations of
society that attracted the attention of the police after Harris posted a death
threat against another student. Closer to the massacre, Harris listed his
stockpile of weapons and posted a hit list. Klebold was less overt but with
Harris made secret videos of their weapons and wrote in his diary of a desire to
plan an attack that would match the bombing in Oklahoma City by rightwing
militiamen that killed 168 people.

Klebold
writes that she had no idea that Dylan was contemplating killing himself or
anyone else. “From the writings Dylan left behind, criminal psychologists have
concluded that he was depressed and suicidal. I’d had no inkling of the battle
Dylan was waging in his mind,” she wrote.

“Dylan’s
participation in the massacre was impossible for me to accept until I began to
connect it to his own death. Once I saw his journals, it was clear to me that
Dylan entered the school with the intention of dying there. In order to
understand what he might have been thinking, I started to learn all I could
about suicide.”

Five
years after the killings, the FBI said they believe that Harris was a clinical
psychopath who masterminded the plan and Klebold depressive.

The
massacre continues to generate debate about the motives of the two youths and
whether anything could have been done to stop them. The magazine said that Susan
Klebold was not paid for the article and will not be making an appearance on
Oprah Winfrey’s television
show.


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Effexor/SSRI Withdrawal: Brain Zaps: Peoples Pharmacy

Paragraph two reads:  “After cutting my dose in half, I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and pressure in my ears.”

http://www2.timesdispatch.com/rtd/lifestyles/local_other/article/S-PHAR06_20090902-190006/290023/

Q:I have been taking Effexor XR for two years. At first I was pleased that it relieved the anxiety, depression and excessive worrying I had been suffering. Then I began experiencing insomnia and night sweats and decided to taper off this antidepressant.

After cutting my dose in half, I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and pressure in my ears.

Answer: Many people find that antidepressants such as Effexor (venlafaxine), Cymbalta (duloxetine), Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline) are helpful for depression. But there can be a dark side.

Stopping this type of drug can lead to withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, insomnia, anxiety, sweating, visual disturbances and difficulty concentrating. Many people complain of shocklike sensations in their head (brainzaps” or “shivers”).

556 total views, 2 views today

CELEXA & EFFEXOR: Suicide: 40 Year Old Woman: New York

Paragraphs three and four read:  “The results of an autopsy and toxicological examination have determined the cause of death to be from respiratory suppression with pulmonary edema, secondary to a drug overdose, a release from the state police says.”

“The drugs present that caused the overdose were determined to be Celexa and Effexor, medications prescribed for depression and anxiety, the release adds. Alcohol was also present.”

http://www.stargazette.com/article/20090826/NEWS01/908260338/Hatch+death+ruled+a+suicide

Hatch death ruled a suicide

August 26, 2009

After a 10-month investigation, the death of Kimberly R. Hatch has been ruled to be a suicide.Advertisement

The 40-year-old woman was found dead in her house at 704 Shady Drive, Endwell on Oct. 11 of last year after troopers responded to a 911 call.

The results of an autopsy and toxicological examination have determined the cause of death to be from respiratory suppression with pulmonary edema, secondary to a drug overdose, a release from the state police says.

The drugs present that caused the overdose were determined to be Celexa and Effexor, medications prescribed for depression and anxiety, the release adds. Alcohol was also present.

Dr. James Hayes, the coroner in the case, has ruled the death to be a suicide, said Cpt. James E. Barnes, of the state police.

Hayes said the investigation took 10 months because police had to consider all aspects in the case, consult with the district attorney and coroner’s offices and brief the family on the developments.

The case is now closed, the release says

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