Additional Tylenol Warnings: Now linked to SEVERE Asthma

NOTE FROM DR. ANN BLAKE TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

YET ANOTHER TYLENOL WARNING! Long known toproduce fatal liver damage . . . how many warnings do we need to get the full picture on this deadly drug? There have been increasing warnings this past year which continues toexplain why Tylenol has NEVER been found in my medicine cabinet and never will be!!!

HIGHLIGHTS from the article below:

A pair of studies suggests that the common painkiller acetaminophen — better known as Tylenol in the U.S. — may be fueling a worldwide increase in asthma. ~Reuters Health

While no one knows if the drug causes asthma by itself, another report — published along with the first study — shows for the first time that many toddlers took acetaminophen before they developed asthma symptoms such as wheezing. [I am appauled by how often this deadly drug is given to young children!]

“We have confirmed that acetaminophen use comes first, SO A CAUSAL LINK IS INCREASINGLY LIKELY, [Emphasis added]” . . .

Acetaminophen tied tochildhood wheezing and allergies

4:15pm BST

By Frederik Joelving

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A pair of studies suggests that the common painkiller acetaminophen — better known asTylenol in the U.S. — may be fueling a worldwide increase inasthma.

According to one study out Thursday, acetaminophen could be responsible for as many as four in 10 cases of wheezing and severe asthma in teens.

While no one knows if the drug causes asthma by itself, another report — published along with the first study — shows for the first time that many toddlers took acetaminophen before they developed asthma symptoms such as wheezing.

“We have confirmed that acetaminophen use comes first, so a causal link is increasingly likely,” said Dr. Alemayehu Amberbir, of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia and the University of Nottingham in the UK.

But large-scale clinical tests are necessary before anyone cleans out their medicine cabinet, stressed Amberbir, whose findings are published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

His team followed more than 1,000 Ethiopian babies over three years. When the toddlers turned one, the researchers asked the mothers if their babies had breathing problems, and how much acetaminophen they had used.

About eight percent of the kids began to wheeze between ages one and three. Those who had been given acetaminophen during their first year — before they had breathing trouble — had up to seven times the odds of developing wheezing.

That increase held even after adjusting for fever and coughs, which in principle could have triggered both the wheezing and the use of painkillers.

“What we have is further information and a stronger association between the use of acetaminophen and asthma,” said Dr. Dipak Kanabar, who has written guidelines on painkillers, but wasn’t involved in the new studies.

But Kanabar, a consultant pediatrician at Evelina Children’s Hospital in London, cautioned that parents’ recall isn’t always accurate, which could have influenced the findings.

“We have to be careful when we give advice to parents tostress that these studies do not mean that giving acetaminophen will necessarily result in their child developingasthma,” he said.

But if the link turns out to be real, it could have a major impact on public health, according to another report in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In that study, based on more than 320,000 teens from 50 countries, 11 percent of the children had breathing trouble — only slightly more than the percentage of American children who have asthma.

Those teens who took acetaminophen at least once a month — one third overall, and more than four in 10 Americans — doubled their odds of wheezing.

They were also more likely to have allergic nasal congestion and the skin condition eczema, Dr. Richard W. Beasley, of the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, and colleagues report.

The researchers estimate that acetaminophen could potentially be responsible for up to four in 10 of all asthmasymptoms, including severe ones such as waking up gasping for air once a week or more.

McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the Johnson & Johnson subsidiary that sells Tylenol, said in a comment their product “has over 50 years of clinical history to support its safety and efficacy.”

“The well-documented safety profile for acetaminophen makes it the preferred pain reliever for asthma sufferers,” the company told Reuters Health in an e-mail. The company said there are no gold-standard clinical trials showing “a causal link between acetaminophen and asthma.”

However, Kanabar found in his review of the medical literature that ibuprofen — another painkiller, sometimes sold as Advil — seemed to trigger less wheezing than acetaminophen.

Ibuprofen, however, is not recommended in people withasthma, Kanabar said, and that most doctors favor Tylenol.

Aspirin, another common painkiller, is generally discouraged in children because it can cause short-term breathing problems and other rare side effects.

According to Kanabar, dropping painkillers entirely is probably a bad idea, and might cause a child to feel worse and drink less liquid, which could slow recovery.

So which painkiller should a parent choose if their child has a headache or a fever — Tylenol or ibuprofen?

At this point, said Kanabar, “you could go for either.”

SOURCE: link.reuters.com/sej74n American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, online August 13, 2010.

© Thomson Reuters 2010. TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

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PROZAC: Man Engaged in Massive Self-Mutilation: Lawsuit: Illinois

Paragraph five reads: “Gay wants to go back on Busper, though,
as he says Prozac sexually frustrates him and causes his
stomach to hurt. In addition, during the 11 months that Gay took Prozac,
he cut his testicles, arms, thighs and neck, all of which required
sutures,
the complaint says.”

http://www.madisonrecord.com/news/226207-plaintiff-wants-psychiatrist-to-prescribe-medicine-to-stop-selfmutilation

Plaintiff wants psychiatrist to prescribe medicine to stop self
mutilation
4/21/2010 12:00 PM By Kelly Holleran

A man claims he has cut numerous parts of his body, including his
testicles, because his former psychiatrist refused to prescribe him the correct
medication.

Anthony Gay filed a lawsuit April 12 in Madison County
Circuit Court against Claudia Kachigian.

Gay claims he self mutilates
himself because of anxiety problems. The only medication that prevents Gay from
cutting himself is Busper, according to the complaint. Gay claims he explained
the scenario to his psychiatrist, Kachigian.

However, Kachigian allegedly
refused to prescribe the medication to Gay because it’s a nonformulary
medication, according to the complaint. Instead, she prescribed him Prozac on
April 26, 2009, the suit states.

Gay wants to go back on Busper, though,
as he says Prozac sexually frustrates him and causes his stomach to hurt. In

addition, during the 11 months that Gay took Prozac, he cut his testicles, arms,
thighs and neck, all of which required sutures, the complaint
says.

Finally, on March 8, Kachigian discontinued Gay’s Prozac and on
March 29, she discontinued his psychiatric services, which has caused Gay
additional emotional distress, he claims.

Gay, who will be representing
himself, wants the court to order an independent psychiatrist to examine his
needs. He seeks compensatory and punitive damages.

Madison County
Circuit Court case number: 10-L-416.

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I’m Taking Myself off this Garbage

“Why are Dr.’s so quick to want to give you some kind of antidepressant?”

 

I have just finished reading the story you wrote about your son, Matthew. (“He Never Said Goodbye”–posted here.) My heart was so saddened. I am 42 years old and have in the past year and a half started experiencing problems of feeling really bad. I have gone to my OBGYN Dr. several times trying to find out what the problem is. She was quick to put me on a medication called Prozac. I cried when she said the word.

I am a person that has never been on medication and this was all foreign to me. I took it for 2 months and then took myself off. I thought…. I do not need this! So, a year later I went back to her for my yearly pap and checkup. I was and had been feeling REALLY bad for a long time at that point. She then put me on Wellbutrin. I have been on it for about 7 weeks. It only makes me feel worse.

So I went back to her last week and now she wants to try me on Effexor. I have been on the net looking for answers and that is where I found your story. I have been trying to talk myself off the Wellbutrin for the past week. It is giving me a really bad headache. I have cut down my pills from 2 a day to 1 a day. I am not taking the Effexor. All I have read has been horror stories about that medication. Why are Dr.’s so quick to want to give you some kind of antidepressant. She had done no blood work on me. Just said…. here, take this. At my last appointment with her she told me that is this last medicine did not work (Effexor), then I needed to see a 2002counselor. What is the deal!!! Is the world going crazy???? I need answers. My life is Really Good. I have a wonderful husband, and 4 wonderful children. We are a Christian family. My life is good. I am confused at this point.

I have another appointment with a General Dr. next week. Hopefully he can do something for me besides pushing anti depressants. Thank you so much for your story. After reading this, I know I am making the right decision of taking myself off this garbage and finding out what’s really wrong with me. Thank you so much!!!!

In God’s Love

Barbara

 

4/11/2002

This is Survivor Story number 29.
Total number of stories in current database is 48

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4/07/2001 – Insight Mag – Misleading Medicine

Once again Kelly O’Meara has written an incredible article. This time the
subject is the absurdity of the PMDD diagnosis and the prescribing of Prozac
repacked and renamed as “Sarafem” for that “disorder.” We have included the
first several paragraphs for you and encourage you to go to the Insight
Magazine sight to read the rest.

The article gives much insight into the lengths to which Lilly will go to
cover up the fact that Prozac and Sarafem are one in the same drug.
Apparently as long as they do not admit it publicly it is not reality?

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
http://insightmag.com/archive/200104301.shtml

InsightMag.com
——————————————————————————
Misleading Medicine
——————————————————————————
By Kelly Patricia OMeara
komeara@…
——————————————————————————

Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly is promoting Sarafem as a miracle pill for
women suffering from PMDD, a mental disorder not yet proved to exist.
Whats more, Eli Lilly admits that Sarafem has the same active ingredient as
Prozac, complete with the same dangerous side effects.

Australian-born singer Helen Reddys 1972 hit song I Am Woman has been
called a feminist battle hymn. Many a male disc jockey at the time refused to
air it until the song became part of the soundtrack to a movie and catapulted
to the top of the Billboard charts. Taking a look at the song today, its
hard to imagine the furor generated by the lyrics from the lady down under:
Oh, yes, I am wise, but its wisdom born of pain.
Yes, Ive paid the price, but look how much I gained.
If I have to I can do anything.
I am strong. I am invincible. I am woman.
Nearly three decades since the release of this feminist anthem the
lyrics neither threaten nor offend if they ever did but seem to
acknowledge pride in feminine strength. As if it needed to be said,
historians agree on the significance of women in the building of this nation.
The Jamestown settlement, for instance, was a disaster and on the brink of
failure until women were added to the new colony. The West was won by men and
women working side by side, and the United States triumphed over its enemies
in World War II with the help of nearly 500,000 women in the ranks and
millions more in the factories.
Not surprisingly, women achieved these feats completely unaware that a
few days out of each month they were suffering from a mental disorder. Thats
right. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the use of
Sarafem (fluoxetine) for women suffering from a mental disorder just three or
four days a month in the luteal phase or just before the onset of
menses.
This mental disorder which the American Psychiatric Association
(APA) has not yet accepted, but which is listed in the appendix of the APAs
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) is called
premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD. Its a new-and-improved version of
premenstrual syndrome (PMS), which also has not made it to the hit parade of
the official APA list of mental illnesses. The fact that PMDD is listed only
in the diagnostic manuals appendix reflects the APAs desire for further
research before accepting it as a full-fledged mental disorder.
According to the DSM-IV and the FDA, a woman must experience five or
more symptoms before the diagnosis can be made. The unofficial mental
disorder is said to be characterized by the following symptoms:

Markedly depressed mood

Marked anxiety

Marked affectivity

Decreased interest in activities

Feeling sad, hopeless or self-deprecating

Feeling tense, anxious or on edge

Persistent irritability, anger and increased interpersonal conflicts

Feeling fatigued, lethargic or lacking in energy

Marked changes in appetite

A subjective feeling of being overwhelmed or out of control

Physical symptoms such as breast tenderness, swelling or bloating.

Eli Lilly and Co., the Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical company that
makes Sarafem, has been marketing the new treatment with such gusto that
there are jokes about the company exhibiting obsessive-compulsive disorder.
It seems there isnt a magazine to be picked up or a channel to be surfed
that isnt running a Sarafem advertisement.
These ads show women expressing many things. One TV spot depicts a
woman trying to button her slacks and looking angry and agitated. Another
scene shows a woman snapping at her husband, Just leave me alone, while
still another involves a woman slumped on the couch sobbing. Then there is
the slogan: Sarafem More like the woman you are.
Lilly reports in its ads that now, Doctors can treat PMDD with
Sarafem the first and only prescription medication for PMDD. The ad
further states that, Sarafem contains fluoxetine hydrochloride, the same
active ingredient found in Prozac. But both Sarafem and Prozac are
fluoxetine hydrochloride. According to Laura Miller, marketing associate for
Eli Lilly, Fluoxetine hydrochloride is the same active ingredient in Sarafem
as in Prozac. Again and again Insight asked, Then is it the same thing?
Again and again Miller only repeated that the two identical doses of
fluoxetine hydrochloride have the same active ingredient.
Miller refused to acknowledge that Sarafem is just Prozac repackaged,
or that the pill color was changed from green to feminine pink and lavender
to market it for a not-yet-approved mental disorder that never before
existed. The Lilly representative did say the difference in the treatments is
in how women react to the drug.
Never mind that all this dramatic hype, supported by millions of
dollars in marketing, has occurred just before Lilly loses its exclusivity on
Prozac in August. . . . to finish article go to:

http://insightmag.com/archive/200104301.shtml

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Hallucinations on Cozar

“If I waited 2 more weeks my mother would be dead.”

 

My Mom was put on the drug Cozar for high blood pressure after being on Lopressor successfully for year. Cozar sent her into hallucinations both hearing things and seeing things, and it also caused a rapid heartbeat and sent her into seizures. Now, she has to take Dilantin for it. It was only after asking Rite Aide drug store chain to send me all the adverse side effects on this drug that I found same case scenarios as to what happened to my Mother. I told her Doctor about what happened, and she said, “Well it sometimes takes a couple of weeks for the body to adjust.” If I had waited two more weeks my mother would be dead. Now needless to say, we fired her doctor and found an alternative medicine doctor. Please tell everyone–Cozar is very dangerous!

Thanks

Eric Bradway
elbradway@erols.com

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 47.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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