SC Family of Four Dead in Murder/Suicide

miller family

Sheddrick Byron Miller, 38, Kia, 28, Kyler 3 and Syrai, 1

The father shot all of them this past week and everyone who knew them is looking for the anser as to why someone would do something so completely out of character. Each family member died from a gunshot to the head, Watts said. Once again when this is so out of character we have to ask if antidepressants were involved. Hopefully we will have those answers quickly in this case but the answer rarely comes quickly or easily. We do know the markers are there because it generally takes a brain tumor or a chemical to change behavior that drastically.

Original Article: http://www.thestate.com/2014/01/16/3210387/ids-expected-to-be-released-in.html

Friends struggling with why religious Irmo man would kill his family, himself

BY NOELLE PHILLIPS
nophillips@thestate.com January 16, 2014

A photo shows a smiling family wearing their Sunday best while standing on the front porch of a recently bought home.

The happiness in that Facebook picture – and dozens of others posted on the social media site – is how friends and acquaintances knew the Miller family.

And people who talked Thursday about that family said they don’t understand what would have led the father, 38-year-old Sheddrick Byron Miller, to shoot and kill his wife and two children before turning a gun on himself.

“I’m sick to my stomach,” said Tammy Doctor, who owns a beauty salon next to a barber shop that Miller owned. “He never showed one sign. I can’t see it.”

Richland County Coroner Gary Watts released a short report Thursday identifying Miller, his wife, 28-year-old Kia Von Miller, and their children, Kyler, 3, and Syrai, 1. Each family member died from a gunshot to the head, Watts said.

It appeared that Sheddrick Miller shot his children and wife before turning the gun on himself, the coroner said. However, the exact time and the circumstances surrounding the shootings remain under investigation, he said.

Two cars were parked Thursday evening outside the family’s white, two-story home in the Riverwalk subdivision off Broad River Road. Two teddy bears and a splash of white flowers had been placed in the front yard.

Richland County sheriff’s investigators said they were called to the home around 10:30 a.m., Wednesday by Sheddrick Miller’s mother. She had gone to the house after she did not hear from her son for several days, according to earlier sheriff’s department reports.

Investigators found the children in their own bedrooms and the adults were found together in another room. A handgun was near the father, the sheriff’s reports stated.

The family appeared to have spent much of their time in the Broad River Road area as their home, business and church were off the major thoroughfare that runs from north Columbia to Irmo.

They attended the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness, where they were known by pretty much everyone in the congregation, said Gary Malcome, a minister. A neighbor said the couple hosted Bible studies at their home.

Church members were struggling to accept the news, and Malcome said they hoped to release a statement soon.

“As you can imagine the situation is just terrible, and we don’t know what to say at this time,” Malcome said as he put his hand on his forehead. “What do you say in a case like this?”

Malcome said he was just trying to take care of his congregation.

Sheddrick Miller owned Kyler’s Barber Shop, a storefront tucked into a pocket of small businesses on Seminole Road, off Broad River Road. The shop was named after his son. Miller also had created a line of fragrances that he had named “Syrai” after his daughter and sold them in the shop.

Miller had owned the barber shop for several years, Doctor said. They visited each other’s shops often to talk or to make change if one of them needed smaller bills, she said.

The shop had a barber’s chair shaped like a race car for children, and the Millers’ son would sit in it when he came to work with his father, she said. Doctor also described Miller as a “genius with the clippers,” saying he could cut any design into a person’s close-cropped hair.

Kia Miller was a stay-at-home mom, Doctor said. The couple each had ties to New York, she said.

“He was a religious man,” she said. “He loved his kids. Beautiful wife.”

Jehovah’s Witnesses do not celebrate Christmas, but the Miller family had gone to Walt Disney World in Orlando over the holidays, Doctor said. Sheddrick Miller was expected to re-open his shop on Monday but did not, she said.

“His clients started coming over here,” Doctor said. “They had been calling and calling and calling.”

As far as Doctor could tell, the Millers were a happy, loving family. There were no outward signs of problems, she said. She said she has no idea why Sheddrick Miller would have shot his family and himself.

Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott declined to offer further details about what might have caused Sheddrick Miller to do what he did.

“It’s a tragic situation,” he said.

In 2013, domestic violence led to an increase in homicides in the county, Lott said. He lamented that 2014 has started with four homicides caused by domestic violence.

“What bothers us is how do we prevent this from happening,” he said.

Reporter Cassie Cope contributed.

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2014/01/16/3210387/ids-expected-to-be-released-in.html#storylink=cpy

 

Coroner identifies family as the victims in Riverwalk murder-suicide

Posted: Jan 15, 2014 7:55 PM PST
Updated: Jan 26, 2014 12:18 PM PST

The Richland County Coroner’s Office has released the identities of the four people killed in a murder-suicide on Forest Walk Court in Irmo.

Coroner Gary Watts says 38-year-old Sheddrick Miller, 28-year-old Kia Von Miller, 3-year-old Kyler Devane Miller, and 1-year-old Syrai Raquel Miller all died from gunshot wounds to the head.

“It appears that Mr. Miller shot his family members and then turned the gun on himself making this a murder-suicide,” said Watts.

Watts says it is currently unknown when exactly the incident took place.

Deputies received a call about the incident at Forest Walk Court before noon Wednesday. Wilson said the male victim’s mother came to the home and found the scene after not hearing from her son for several days.

Neighbors tell us the Millers were Jehovah’s Witnesses and very involved in their religion. Sheddrick, a barber, was a small business owner.

On Thursday, crime scene tape at the Forest Walk Court home was replaced by a memorial to Kyler and Syrai — two teddy bears on the front lawn and flowers.

The sign on the door at Miller’s barbershop has said closed for several days, with customers saying they haven’t seen Miller since last week. They’re shocked that something like this could happen to what seemed to be a tight-knit family.

“Everybody’s in awe, everybody’s shocked, because he catered to a lot of people in the community,” said customer Christopher O’Berry. “A lot of people around here went in there and got their hair cut, came and visited with him. He was a genuine character.”

O’Berry says this incident is not in line with who Miller was — a clean-cut guy always in suits.

“He was always talking about his religious beliefs and he seemed to be a well-rounded individual,” said O’Berry.

Customers in the shop said Miller had talked about the family’s recent trip to Disney World. They also said Kyler was always in the barbershop with his father.

“All of us are waiting to hear what led to this,” said O’Berry.

Sheriff’s investigators continue to look into the circumstances leading up to the Miller’s deaths. The coroner’s office, meanwhile, says they’re still waiting on several toxicology reports.

Copyright 2014 WIS. All rights reserved.

http://www.live5news.com/story/24466406/coroner-identifies-family-of-four-as-the-victims-in-riverwalk-murder-suicide

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George Zimmerman’s Wife Doubts His Innocence in Martin Killing After Being Attacked by Husband

Shellie Zimmerman

Shellie Zimmerman

Only weeks ago I posted about George Zimmerman being on Adderall when Trayvon Martin was killed and that the drug could have produced paranoia where there was little to no reason for it and triggered the extreme violence of the attack…leading to a death that could have been prevented. Well now George Zimmerman has attacked his own wife and she is doubting his innocence after seeing this violence in her husband where he threatened her and punched her father in the nose. She has now filed for divorce.

Am I surprised? Not in the least! The adverse reactions from the medications will continue to worse as time goes on and more and more meds are added on as they are prescribed to treat the adverse reactions he is having to the first one. I would expect that antidepressants were added to his medications after this incident with Trayvon Martin and in Zimmerman’s dealing with the stress of the court case. Of course this would make him more of a powder keg than he would have been while just on the Adderal which has been found in court to produce impulsive cases of murder.

His wife, Shellie Zimmerman, reported to the Today Show this morning that her husband had “a look in his eyes that I’ve never seen before.” And she is wondering now who she is married to – a statement that many, many mates of those on these deadly medications have made repeatedly over the past several decades. And most mates have seen that look in the eyes and know to be frightened out of their minds when they see it….that blank determined stare that brings on serious adrenalin rushes to help you exit quickly!

“Although cops reported that no gun was found after they responded to the dispute, she still believes her husband was packing.

“I absolutely stand by my story,” she said. “I did not see a gun. But … I know my husband. I saw him in a stance and a look in his eyes that I’ve never seen before.”

“This person that I’m married to, that I’m divorcing, I’ve kind of realized now that I don’t know him,” she told Matt Lauer on Thursday. “And I really don’t know what he’s capable of.”

“…this revelation in my life has really helped me to take the blinders off.”

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/estranged-wife-george-zimmerman-doubtful-husband-innocence-trayvon-martin-killing-article-1.1468073#ixzz2g2xIqBhb

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: *”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

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PAXIL: 85 Year Old Man Kills Wife: No History of Violence

PAXIL: 85 Year Old Man Kills Wife: No History of Violence

Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:26 pm

“Paul Deyoub, a forensic psychologist with the Arkansas State Hospital in Little Rock, testified for the state that he didn’t believe Basham was delirious when he killed his wife.

“He said he didn’t believe Basham’s contention that he didn’t remember anything about the killing, and that his first memory that day was waking up in the hospital. He said nearly all defendants charged with domestic homicide that he has evaluated claim to have no memory or some loss of memory of thecrime.”

Well Mr. Forensic Psychologist just for your information (which I am sure drug companies have paid enough to your institution of higher learning to assure you never learn), the reason that ” . . . nearly all defendants charged with domestic homicide [that you have] evaluated claim to have no memory or some loss of memory of the crime” is because the large majority of those
defendants charged with domestic homicide are on SSRI or SNRI antidepressants which affect memory so adversely that “amnesia” is listed as a frequent side effect. WAKE UP!!! If they cannot even remember who they are, how can they remember what happened?!!!

And if this case was prosecuted by the same prosecutor I went up against in Fayetteville a few years ago, who could not make one statement without first reading it from the SSRI Prosecutor’s How to Manual, it is no wonder the courts’ time is still being wasted prosecuting such cases when they should be immediately dismissed and apologis and settlements issued directly from the
drug manufacturers to these families! How very tragic for this poor old man and his family!!!

[The SSRI Prosecutor’s manual is distributed by the drug manufacturers in criminal cases to make sure that anyone who commits a crime, while under the influence of their drugs, goes immediately to jail . Why? So that their drugs remain “innocent” and therefore lucrative because who would want to use a drug that a court has just said produced a suicide or murder or other violent crime? Is providing such a manual illegal? No, but probably should be. Is it unethical? Without a doubt!!!!

But it was obvious to me when testifying in these cases that this manualexisted due to prosecutors asking the same questions of me, almost word for word in every case, no matter which SSRI was involved or where in the country the case was tried. So, while working as the defense attorney on Christopher Pittman’s case, Andy Vickery asked for the manual as evidence and got a copy
for us. If anyone would like to waste their time reading it let me know and I will gladly send you a copy.]

Now back to this elderly man’s case:

As you read through the next two paragraphs understand why I gasp when I hear that this man was given an SSRI while suffering from anxiety, pneumoniaand sleep apnea. You see, anything that increases serotonin – as the SSRI antidepressants are designed to do and all antidepressants do – shuts down the lungs thereby cutting off oxygen to the brain. This is how these drugs produce brain damage, the cutting off of the oxygen supply.

[If you would like to test out this idea on your own, do what I do. Every time you see someone who is not elderly, but generally is overweight and is
carrying around an oxygen tank, ask them which antidepressant they have been on and how long. Then explain to them that the main function of serotonin is the
constriction of smooth muscle tissue which includes the lungs and bronchial tubes [and all major organs] which is why they now need oxygen. And then give
them our website because they are going to want to know what else these drugs have done to their health. But always stress that abrupt or rapid
discontinuation of the drug/drugs is very dangerous.]

Paragraph 4 reads: “Ross testified that in an attempt to explain how Basham, who never had a reputation for violence and always got along with his
wife, could have committed such a bizarre act, she concluded that Basham suffered from delirium.”

Paragraph 7 reads: “Ross pointed out that Autry Basham had pneumonia, took the drug Paxil for anxiety

and suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. All those factors, which were present on the day of Marie Basham’s death, inhibited his ability to get
oxygen to his brain. A lack of oxygen can trigger delirium, she said, especially in the elderly.”

Congratulations are in order for Dr. Ross for being able to understand the real reason for Autry Basham’s delirium was lack of oxygen!!! I wish more
doctors would work a little harder to see what is actually happening in these cases to produce such out of character behavior rather than following the old
school where the drugs involved were very different. Perhaps lack of oxygen leading to delirium is an easier conclusion to arrive at in an elderly patient,
but it does happen in all age groups and is a huge contributing factor in these tragic cases. It is also another reason why hyperbaric oxygen treatment
is so very helpful after using these drugs and subsequently suffering from elevated serotonin levels.

There should be grave concern in our country about such tragic cases as this one where a couple has had a long and loving marriage relationship and in an
instant it is ended in such horror because of what we call “medication”! For those of you who are younger and sadly may not be aware, things like this
DID NOT HAPPEN in the world we grew up in!!!! Cases like this (which I now see far too often) were basically non-existent before the widespread use of
serotonergic drugs.

As it states on the front cover of my book, these drugs have literally turned our world upside down! For this we owe the younger generation and those
generations to come our deepest apologies for the extensive damage we have allowed to occur. I fear we have left you a terrible, terrible legacy that at
this point I do not know if we can make restitution for it.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org(http://www.drugawareness.org/) &
www.ssristories.org (http://www.ssristories.org/)
Author of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare & the audio, Help! I Can’t
Get Off My Antidepressant!!! ()

http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/241972/
(http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/241972/)

SEBASTIAN COUNTY : Sides dispute delirium led to husband’s killing of wife
BY DAVE HUGHES

Posted on Thursday, October 30, 2008

GREENWOOD ­ A Fayetteville psychiatrist said Wednesday that 85-year-old Autry Basham suffered from delirium brought on by pneumonia and a sleep
disorder when he slashed the throat of his 83-year-old wife last year.

The testimony of Dr. Robin Ross in Sebastian County Circuit Court in Basham’s first degree murder trial bolstered the defense’s contention that Basham of
Mansfield is innocent of murder because of a mental disease or defect at the time he killed his wife of 64 years, Lola Marie Basham, on Aug. 27, 2007.

The jury trial before Circuit Judge James Cox began Monday and is expected to wrap up today.

Ross testified that in an attempt to explain how Basham, who never had areputation for violence and always got along with his wife, could have
committed such a bizarre act, she concluded that Basham suffered from delirium.

She said tension and anxiety Basham may have been feeling over the falling out between his wife and son Jerry Basham didn’t play a role in triggering
the delirium.

Prosecutors have told jurors they believe Basham killed his wife after they argued the weekend before about her failing memory and her belief that their
son didn’t pay as much attention to them as he should, given the financial and other help they gave him over the years.

Ross pointed out that Autry Basham had pneumonia, took the drug Paxil for anxiety and suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. All those factors, which
were present on the day of Marie Basham’s death, inhibited his ability to get oxygen to his brain. A lack of oxygen can trigger delirium, she said,
especially in the elderly.

Delirium was defined as a disruption of consciousness and a change in perception that can come on rapidly and can come and go over time. It would
have been possible for Basham, she said, to be delirious and still carry out a sequence of events in killing his wife.

In rebuttal, the prosecution called Little Rock forensic psychiatrist Raymond Molden who testified there was no direct evidence that Basham suffered
from delirium.

He said the fact that Basham called his son and daughter-in-law before killing his wife and then carried out the series of actions in killing his wife
showed that he took steps in a logical sequence to bring about a result.

Following a logical sequence of steps, he said, was inconsistent with aperson suffering from delirium.

Paul Deyoub, a forensic psychologist with the Arkansas State Hospital in Little Rock, testified for the state that he didn’t believe Basham was
deliriouswhen he killed his wife.

He said he didn’t believe Basham’s contention that he didn’t remember anything about the killing, and that his first memory that day was waking up in
the hospital. He said nearly all defendants charged with domestic homicide that he has evaluated claim to have no memory or some loss of memory of the
crime.

As you read through the next two paragraphs understand why I gasp when I hear that this man was given an SSRI while suffering from anxiety, pneumoniaand sleep apnea. You see, anything that increases serotonin – as the SSRI antidepressants are designed to do and all antidepressants do – shuts down the lungs thereby cutting off oxygen to the brain. This is how these drugs produce brain damage, the cutting off of the oxygen supply.

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6/10/2000 – Boston Globe carries story on Forsyth suit

http://199.97.97.16/contWriter/yhd7/2000/06/08/medic/8169-0102-pat_nytimes.h
tml

Eli Lilly Sued By Family Of Prozac User Who Killed Wife, Self

Mitchell Zuckoff
c.2000 The Boston Globe

Opening a new front in the battle over Prozac and suicide, the family of
a man who killed his wife then himself while taking the drug are accusing
Eli Lilly and Co. of fraud for allegedly concealing damaging details about
its blockbuster antidepressant.

In a federal lawsuit filed in Hawaii, the family of William Forsyth
claims that Lilly “committed a fraud on the court” by failing to tell the
family’s lawyers about a patent that claims a new version of the drug
eliminates side effects of the existing Prozac, including violent and
suicidal thoughts among a small percentage of users.

Despite consistently denying any link between Prozac and suicide,
Lilly has purchased an exclusive license to market the new drug from a
Massachusetts company that owns the patent.

The suit says Lilly actively concealed the potentially explosive
patent language during a trial last year over Prozac’s alleged role in the
couple’s deaths. The trial ended with a verdict in Lilly’s favor; the family
has appealed.

“Lilly wanted a verdict that it could herald in the marketplace as
being the definitive vindication of their claims, and they were willing to
get it by withholding important information from the judge and jury,” said
Houston lawyer Andy Vickery, who represents the dead couple’s adult
children.

Vickery said he decided to file the lawsuit after reading a May 7
report in The Boston Globe in which the patent language for the new drug was
publicly disclosed for the first time.

A spokesman for Lilly declined comment on the suit Wednesday, saying
the company had not seen it.

Whatever the outcome, the lawsuit seems certain to fuel a revival of
a longstanding dispute over the Indianapolis drug company’s efforts to blunt
criticism of the popular antidepressant, a green-and-white capsule that has
earned the company billions of dollars and become a totem of modern life.

“To me the new patent can be compared to the tobacco papers. It’s a
pharmaceutical company document that acknowledges this dangerous side effect
which has been downplayed by Eli Lilly and other pharmaceutical companies for
a decade,” said Dr. Joseph Glenmullen, a Cambridge, Mass. psychiatrist whose
new book, “Prozac Backlash,” has helped to trigger the renewed controversy.

Lilly has built its defense of Prozac on a 1991 finding by the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration that there is no credible evidence linking
Prozac to suicide. Glenmullen and others have challenged that finding,
alleging it was based on flawed clinical testing and marred by conflicts of
interest among several members of the FDA’s panel of outside experts.

Though sales have slipped somewhat in recent years as other
antidepressants entered the market, more than 35 million people worldwide
have taken Prozac. Lilly derived more than 25 percent of its $10 billion in
revenues last year from the drug.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Honolulu,
also focuses attention on the new drug, which Lilly hopes will extend its
antidepressant franchise after the last Prozac patents expire in 2004.

The key patent for the new drug was obtained in 1998 by two
officials at Sepracor Inc., a Marlborough, Mass. drug company, along with Dr.
Martin H. Teicher, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard University
who works at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass.

The patent brought Teicher full circle in the Prozac debate: He had
ignited the decade-long controversy over suicidality with a 1990 paper about
sudden, self-destructive tendencies among patients who had recently begun
taking Prozac.

The patent describes an antidepressant derived from Prozac that, the
inventors claim, is formulated in such a way as to decrease the current
drug’s adverse effects, ranging from headaches and nervousness to “intense
violent suicidal thoughts and self-mutiliation.” That claim is based on
Teicher’s paper.

Although that patent language directly contradicts Lilly’s longtime
position on Prozac, the Indianapolis-based drug company clearly saw great
value in the drug described in the patent.

In December 1998, Lilly paid Sepracor $20 million for exclusive
rights to the patent, a portion of which went to Teicher and McLean. Lilly
also promised the inventors $70 million in milestone payments depending on
the new drug’s progress through ongoing clinical trials, and a percentage of
sales if the drug is ultimately approved and sold.

Three months after that deal was struck, in March 1999, a federal
jury in Honolulu began hearing a civil lawsuit Vickery filed on behalf of
the two adult children of the late William and June Forsyth.

A wealthy couple, married for 37 years, the Forsyths had been going
through a rough patch in their marriage in late 1992 and early 1993. William
Forsyth, 63, began suffering panic attacks, and in February 1993 his doctor
prescribed Prozac. After feeling wonderful the first day, Forsyth underwent a
change for the worse and admitted himself to a psychiatric hospital. After a
week, while continuing to take Prozac, he checked himself out.

On March 3, 1993, 11 days after he began taking Prozac, Forsyth
fatally stabbed his wife multiple times with a serrated kitchen knife then
impaled himself on the blade. Their children blamed the drug for what they
said were their father’s completely uncharacteristic acts.

Of some 200 lawsuits filed against Lilly claiming the use of Prozac
led to suicide or violence, the Forsyth case was only the second to yield a
verdict. Lilly settled many of the others, and the only other one to reach a
jury, in 1994, was widely reported to have been a victory for the company. In
fact, it was settled in a secret agreement between Lilly and the plaintiffs.

Lilly obtained its long-sought courtroom victory in the Forsyth case
when the jury said the drug could not be held responsible for the
murder-suicide. In the suit filed Wednesday, however, the Forsyths’ children
claim the victory for Lilly was tainted by the failure to disclose its link
to the new Prozac patent and should be set aside for a new trial.

A key element of Lilly’s defense was its claim that if Forsyth
suffered from the severe form of agitation his children claim led to the
deaths, he would have experienced inner and outer restlessness. No one at the
psychiatric hospital noticed restlessness in Forsyth before his release, and
Lilly’s lawyers and expert witnesses used that to refute his children’s case.

In the patent, however, the side-effect is described purely as inner
restlessless, a condition known as akathisia. Vickery said that difference
is crucial because, if the patent had been disclosed at the trial, it would
have been a powerful answer to Lilly’s argument that outer restlessness –
characterized by relentless fidgeting – was required as evidence of the
side-effect. It also might have challenged Lilly’s overall claims about
suicide, he said.

For instance, a top Lilly scientist, Dr. Gary Tollefson, testified
during the trial that it was his opinion “that there is absolutely no
medically sound evidence of an association between any antidepressant
medicine, including Prozac, and the induction of suicidal ideation
(thoughts) or violence.”

The new patent language, and Lilly’s purchase of exclusive rights to
the invention, might have convinced the jury otherwise, Vickery said.

—-
(The Boston Globe Web site is at http://www.boston.com/globe/

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