PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
so.
__________________________________
Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
were the answer.
‘They made it seem like my world was falling
apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
take drugs, and
I didn’t want to, but they made me think
I really needed it. So I took them’.”

“She said that after a

few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
into a wall.’
She said that according to her doctor, these were
all symptoms of her depression, but
she thinks it was
the drugs.”

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
in cases of mild or moderate depression.

Depressing truth about antidepressants

by Tina
Amirkiai

Jan 27, 2010

If you are one of the millions of people taking
antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
placebo.

A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
severe acute depressions.”

Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

“The biological or physical
symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
“They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

Researchers used a
severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

Researchers concluded
that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
over placebo is substantial.”

Dobransky and other critics maintain that
the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
antidepressants.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
products to the general public.

Dobransky said a big part of the problem
is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
fixes like that do not exist.

“Each case needs to be set in its proper
place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

She said that
after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
thinks it was the drugs.

“I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

A spokesman for
GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
“the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
results.”

If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
Dashed line

©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
University.  A publication of the Medill
School
.

534 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sleeping Pills: Death: 32 Year Old Woman Dies from a …

Paragraph two reads:  “Bolton Coroner’s Court heard that
Samantha Andrews, aged 32, of Harpford Close, Breightmet, died after taking drugs including
sleeping tablets, anti-depressants and
anti-hystamines.”

http://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/4776972.Depressed_woman_died_from_cocktail_of_drugs/

Depressed woman died from cocktail of drugs

11:00am
Friday 4th December 2009

A woman who was suffering from depression died
after taking a cocktail of prescription drugs, an inquest heard.

Bolton
Coroner’s Court heard that Samantha Andrews, aged 32, of Harpford Close, Breightmet,
died after taking drugs including sleeping tablets, anti-depressants and
anti-hystamines.

But Assistant Deputy Coroner Peter Watson said there
was insufficient evidence to prove that Miss Andrews committed suicide and
recorded an open verdict.

The inquest heard that Miss Andrews, who had
trained as a nurse, had previously twice taken overdoses but told doctors that
these were a cry for help.

She was found unconscious in her bed by her
partner, Philip Brockbank, on March 2 and taken for treatment at the Royal
Bolton Hospital, before being transferred to a hospital in Wigan where she died
on March 5.

The cause of death was brain death due to lack of oxygen,
caused by the overdose.

Mr Watson said: “She was still a young woman who
clearly had talent but had troubles in her life.”

528 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Makes Teenage Girl Angry All the Time: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How tragic that this poor young woman would have to turn to
the Dear Abby column (or whatever they call it now) for help with this! Why
would her own doctor not know enough to explain to her that this antidepressant
is causing her blood sugar to drop producing adrenalin rushes as the body’s
attempt to normalize sugar? Since adrenalin is your fight or flight hormone it
is no wonder she is angry all the time and no wonder it affects relationships as
the patients become meaner and meaner when they cannot control their blood sugar
levels due to the effects of these drugs.

You ask if she has been screened for diabetes? I may not show
up yet, but soon will with her pancreas experiencing that strong of a negative
effect from the antidepressant. This is a very bright young woman to be able to
notice what effect this drug is having upon her. And her mother may change her
mind about having her daughter take the antidepressant when her daughter
violently attacks her in a rage produced by the drug! What a shame her
mother is not listening to her as she cries out for help knowing what
violence the drugs are causing her to be capable of, yet frightened to verbalize
those horribly violent thoughts previously so completely foreign to
her.
__________________________________
Last part of paragraph two reads:  ” However, the
antidepressant causes me to be uncontrollably angry
all the time.
I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which just adds to
my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect my
relationships with friends and family.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091130/LIFE/911300302/-1/ENTERTAIN

Teen frets taking her antidepressants

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
November 30, 2009 12:00
AM

Dear Annie: I am a 16-year-old girl who still wets the bed. I have
tried everything from wearing an alarm to taking medication.

I am now on
a prescription that works by telling my kidneys to stop producing urine,
although it doesn’t work all the time. A urologist prescribed an antidepressant

that prevents me from sleeping too deeply. With the combination of these two
medicines, I no longer wet the bed. However, the antidepressant causes me to be
uncontrollably angry all the time. I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which
just adds to my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect
my relationships with friends and family.

My mom wants me to keep taking
it because it works. But, Annie, I don’t like being angry all the time, and I
don’t want to be on medication for the rest of my life. What can I
do?

­ At a Loss

Dear At a Loss: Most teens with enuresis are
exceedingly deep sleepers, and many also have a small bladder, exacerbating the

problem. We assume you have been screened for diabetes and a genetic link, and
that you don’t drink alcohol. Many sufferers do well with a moisture-sensor
alarm, and we’re sorry that doesn’t work for you. The other common treatment is
the medication you currently are using. However, since you are having unpleasant
side effects, please discuss this with your doctor. It’s possible your dosage
can be altered so you can still get the benefits without such a big emotional
swing. Also discuss exercises to strengthen and enlarge your bladder. For more
information and to keep abreast of new developments, contact the National Kidney
Foundation (kidney.org) at 1-888-WAKE-DRY
(1-888-925-3379).

604 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Attempts Suicide 8 Times While on Antidepressants-UK

Paragraphs 18 through 26 read:  “At 12 she was on
antidepressants
, seeing a child psychologist and was educated at
home.

“At the age of 16 she was prescribed  another type form
of antidepressants and was scared of leaving the safety of her
home to go to college.”

“Combined with her BDD symptoms, the anxiety was
too much to bear and the teenager tried to kill
herself with an overdose of painkillers in September 1999. “

“She
was found by her mother Heather Samuels, who rushed her to hospital and saved
her life.”

“It was then Ms Camille was referred to another child
psychologist, but the symptoms proved too much again.”

“At the age of 17
, she tried to end her life again in June 2000, but was saved and finally
diagnosed with BDD.”

“But treatment did not help and at 18, she
tried to take an overdose in the summer of 2001 and October 2001,

each time being rescued by her now ex-partner.”

“For three years
Ms Camille has kept her illness at bay but in summer
2004 tried twice to commit suicide.”

“It was finally at the age
of 23, in 2006, that she hit rock bottom and made what would be
the final attempt to take her own
life.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1227516/Attractive-student-suffering-body-dysmorphia-attemptssuicidetimes-seeing-disgusting-figure-mirror.html

Blind to her own beauty: The woman with body dysmorphia who can’t bear to
look at her own reflection

By Daily
Mail Reporter

Last updated at 2:11 PM on 13th November 2009

A
young woman spoke today of her secret battle against a rare body dysmorphia
condition that has caused her to attempt suicide eight times.

Hannah
Camille, 26, regularly gets admiring glances from men, but takes them as looks
of repulsion, not attraction.

Her body dysmorphic disorder blinds her to
her own beauty and makes her feel worthless – despite obvious good
looks.

Recovering: Hannah Camille’s body dysmorphic disorder made her
hate her body so much she tried to commit suicide eight times

Depression: Hannah, pictured at 21, before she hit rock bottom two years
later and made what would be the final attempt to take her own life

The
illness is so severe it has made Hannah try to take her own life eight
times.

Ms Camille, from Walsall, West Midlands, claims when she looks in
a mirror, she cannot see the person everyone else does, but a grotesque, fat
figure.

But now, Hannah thinks she has found the key to battling the
illness – thanks to her passion for photography.

By making herself a work
of art, she says she has managed to look at herself objectively.

Ms
Camille’s nightmare began when she was just nine and started puberty early,
sparking feelings of self-loathing and paranoia.

Hannah said: ‘When I
look in the mirror all I see is where it’s fat. I can see parts of me that look
thin but I push that aside.

‘I see my stomach sticking out, my hips are
wide and my legs are huge.

‘When it first started I can remember thinking
that I wasn’t good enough and believing people thought I was disgusting to be
around.

‘I remember feeling everybody hated me and I used to focus on
everyone’s put downs, and dismiss any compliments.

‘The worst point was
just before I started college, I tried to commit suicide for the first
time.

‘That was when I felt I didn’t care if I’m not alive, that I was
not afraid to die. It was one my lowest points.’

Despite a happy
childhood, Ms Camille was convinced she was fat, ugly and stupid – quickly
developing anorexia.

At 12 she was on antidepressants, seeing a child
psychologist and was educated at home.

At the age of 16 she was
prescribed  another type form of antidepressants and was scared of leaving
the safety of her home to go to college.

Combined with her BDD symptoms,
the anxiety was too much to bear and the teenager tried to kill herself with an
overdose of painkillers in September 1999.

She was found by her mother
Heather Samuels, who rushed her to hospital and saved her life.

It was
then Ms Camille was referred to another child psychologist, but the symptoms
proved too much again.

At the age of 17 , she tried to end her life again
in June 2000, but was saved and finally diagnosed with BDD.

But treatment
did not help and at 18, she tried to take an overdose in the summer of 2001 and
October 2001, each time being rescued by her now ex-partner.

For three
years Ms Camille has kept her illness at bay but in summer 2004 tried twice to
commit suicide.

It was finally at the age of 23, in 2006, that she hit
rock bottom and made what would be the final attempt to take her own
life.

Following a massive nervous breakdown, doctors tried to commit her,
but mother Heather, 69, intervened and she was allowed to stay at home under
24-hour suicide watch.

Heather’s pain, new medication and a therapist –
who suggested using her photography skills to help boost Hannah’s confidence –
proved the turning point.

It was looking back at pictures she had taken
of herself that brought on the start of recovery.

Moving on: Hannah’s
passion for photography triggered her to look at her body objectively and helped
others with a similar condition

Now Ms Camille has just completed her
first exhibition of her photographs at the Chameleon Art Gallery in Walsall to
critical acclaim.

Hannah said: ‘I looked at them and I just saw myself as
an art piece rather than me.

‘It really helped to accept myself and not
think about body and image but a person as a whole.

‘It was then I
contacted other sufferers and offered to take pictures of them.

‘I
believe that it helped them in a way as much as it did me – it was a kind of
group therapy.

‘You are never over BDD but on a good day I can say
I look okay.

‘If I can look in the mirror and say I look okay, that I can
go out and do normal things like window-shop and have a picnic, to me that is
wonderful.

‘To others it can sound mundane, but compared to what I been
though mundane is positive for me. It’s better than how I felt in the
past.

‘I looked at a picture of myself last night and I thought I looked
beautiful.

“It wasn’t because I thought I was attractive – it was because
I looked happy.’

420 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN MEDS: Death: Former Woman Soldier: England

Paragraphs two and three read:  “Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers andantidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.”

“Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.”

http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=ENOnline&category=News&tBrand=ENOnline&tCategory=news&itemid=NOED27%20Aug%202009%2007%3A35%3A01%3A210

Uncertainty over overdose death

Chanice Ward.
REBECCA GOUGH
27 August 2009 07:35

A coroner has ruled that a young woman who was discharged from the army against her will and who died of an overdose earlier this year may not have deliberately taken her own life.

Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers and antidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.

Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.

The inquest heard how Miss Ward, who was pursuing a case for compensation with the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency, had a history of depression and died as a result of a “self-administered overdose”.

Mr Ward, 57, who served 22 years in the army, said: “I know this inquest could not appoint blame but I’m certainly of the opinion that her time in the military and in active service worsened her state of mind. We have a case going on with the MoD and will be continuing her cause.”

For the last five years Miss Ward, of Barford, near Hethersett, had been working at Norwich Union in Surrey Street, Norwich and was a PA in the pensions department.

Since the age of 18 she had served six years in the Royal Medical Corps as a combat medic and ambulance technician, from 1997 to 2003, and won award medals from Bosnia and Kosovo.

She was found dead in the caravan she rented in Barford on April 3, but speaking at her inquest, her family and friends said they were shocked she had taken an overdose.

Her mother, Donna Holder, said her daughter was diagnosed with depression when she was a teenager but had appeared much happier in recent months.

Ms Holder said: “It was a very great shock because she was so well and had so many future plans and so much to look forward to.”

Mr Ward added that he had taken a phone call from his daughter a few weeks before she died, and said: “She said to me ‘I don’t think I’ve got long left to live’, and I said she was being silly but I knew deep down that she knew it.

“In the last six months she appeared tremendously upbeat but there was something underlying. She always appeared on the surface to be putting on a front but you never knew underneath what was going on.”

Her close friend Stanley Woodhouse was with her the weekend before she died and said: “I think I probably spent more time with her in the last few months of her life than anybody did.

“She thought the medication she was on had solved a lot of her problems but, as her father has said, we didn’t really know what was going on deep down. The feeling she gave to me was that she was upbeat about life.”

In an interview with our sister paper the Evening News earlier this year Ms Ward claimed she twice tried to kill herself but that her bosses would not accept she was suffering from an illness.

A MoD spokesman said: “Our thoughts are with the family of Chanice Ward at this difficult time.

“We take the welfare of all our service personnel and veterans seriously.

“We have made great progress both in the treatment of mental health problems and in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help.

“Treatment for mental health disorders, including post-traumatic stress, is also available for veterans through six community-based mental health pilot schemes the MoD has created with the NHS.”

622 total views, no views today