PROZAC/SSRIs: SYMPTOMS WORSEN WHILE MEDICATED – AUTHOR “VOLUNTARY MADNESS”

Page seven reads [in part]:  “My doc and I tried a lot of
other medications along the way, and I had all the classic side effects.  I
went hypomanic on the Prozac, so we added mood stabilizers
to even me out.  I lost interest in sex, so we tried another
antidepressant, Wellbutrin, to bring me back.  We switched,
jiggered, and recombined, looking for that perfect pickle.  But if one
thing didn’t give me a rash or panic attacks, then it made me gobble salty junk
food in the middle of the night.  I tried most of the majors, and burned
through their effects.
I got scrawny, then fat,
petrified, then out of control, sexless, then
sex-obsessed.”

“Eventually the dope just doesn’t work the way it used
to.  Even Klonipin needs a boost to keep hammering you.  And that’s
when they start referring to you in whispered tones as ‘medication-resistant’.”

So I ended up in the bin that
first time, to do some serious recalibration.  I was all used up.

In the space of a few years, I went from being just
another twenty-something have a good old-fashioned life crisis to being a
pscyhotropic junky.”

Page 280 [ 3rd paragraph] reads:  “I
know that when I go off medication I feel far worse than I ever felt
before I took it,
and I have never been able to stand the downside for
more than a few months, so I don’t know how long my brain
might take to recalibrate, if it can.”

http://www.amazon.com/VoluntaryMadness-Year-Found-Loony/dp/0670019712/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1252891043&sr=1-1

Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin
(Hardcover)

by Norah
Vincent

Norah Vincent (Author)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers
Weekly
Vincent’s first trip to a mental institution­to which the
writing of Self-Made Man drove her­convinced her that further
immersion would give her great material for a follow-up. The grand tour consists
of voluntary commitments to a hospital mental ward, a small private facility and
a boutique facility; but Vincent’s efforts to make a big statement about the
state of mental health treatment quickly give way to a more personal journey. An
attempt to wean herself off Prozac, for example, adds a greater sense of urgency
to her second research trip, while the therapists overseeing her final treatment
lead her to a major emotional breakthrough. Meanwhile, her fellow patients are
easily able to peg her as an emotional parasite, though this rarely stops them
from interacting with her­and though their neediness sometimes frustrates
her, she is less judgmental of them than of the doctors and nurses. The
conclusions Vincent draws from her experiences tend toward the obvious (the
better the facilities, the better chance for recovery) and the banal: No one can
heal you except you. Though keenly observed, her account never fully transcends
its central gimmick. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a
division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

617 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: AGITATED MAN RUNS AROUND WITH AN AX: ENGLAND

Paragraphs three through seven read:  “A previous
hearing, the court heard that police were called to the Bonds Street area to
investigate
reports of a man ‘running round with an
axe in an agitated state.”

“The 40-year-old went into his
brother’s house and family members were able to remove the top of the axe and
give it to police.”

“Millar was arrested and during interview said he
had very little recollection of the incident. He told police the axe was
his and that he owned it for work purposes.”

“During sentencing at the
City’s Magistrate’s Court, defence solicitor Maeliosa Barr said Millar was a
“very vulnerable man” and suffered from

depression.”

“ ‘He realised that by not taking
his medication
he got himself into the difficulty he now
faces’.”

SSRI Stories note:  The Physicians Desk Reference lists
amnesia as a Frequent side-effect of Prozac and other
antidepressants.

http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/Waterside-man-ran-aroundwith.5627956.jp

Thursday, 10th September 2009

Waterside man ran around with axe

Published Date:
09 September 2009
By Staff reporter

A MAN who admitted running
around the Waterside with an axe has been given a three month jail term
suspended for three years.

Gary Keith Millar, 40, pleaded guilty to
possessing an offensive weapon on July 19, 2009.

A previous hearing, the
court heard that police were called to the Bonds Street area to investigate
reports of a man ‘running round with an axe in an agitated state.

The
40-year-old went into his brother’s house and family members were able to remove
the top of the axe and give it to police.

Millar was arrested and during
interview said he had very little recollection of the incident. He told police
the axe was his and that he owned it for work purposes.

During sentencing
at the City’s Magistrate’s Court, defence solicitor Maeliosa Barr said Millar
was a “very vulnerable man” and suffered from depression.

“He realised
that by not taking his medication he got himself into the difficulty he now
faces.”

Handing down the suspended jail term and ordering the destruction
of the axe, Deputy District Judge Bernie Kelly said: “This is a very serious
offence. The arming of oneself with a weapon has to be taken very
seriously.”

Taking into account the fact that Millar had spent six weeks
in custody on remand, the judge said she hopes this “marks a turning point in
any further offending.”

The full article contains 239 words and
appears in Londonderry Sentinel newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

  • Last Updated: 08 September 2009 1:49 PM
  • Source: Londonderry Sentinel
  • Location: Waterside

1,092 total views, no views today

PROZAC WITHDRAWAL: Woman Runs Away From Home: Kentucky

Paragraphs six and seven  read:  “Kelsey had been depressed and was taking several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey, particularly Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.”

“The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only $80 in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her medication with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard from her.”

863 total views, 1 views today

PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

676 total views, no views today

PROZAC: Woman Develops Hypomania: Later Diagnosed as Bipolar as They All Are!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): This little piece on antidepressant-induced bipolar disorder ends with the following questions: “What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?”

When you consider that the rate of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by 4000% in a recent 10 year period that the numbers of those answering a resounding YES to those questions is VERY HIGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have publicly stated over and over again and will say it once again, “Antidepressants are the biggest CAUSE of Bipolar Disorder on the planet!”

1. Mania is a continuous series of mild seizures in the brain.

2. Seizures come from over stimulation of the brain.

3. ANTI – depressants, or the opposite of a depressant – a stimulant.

4. The over stimulation of the brain (especially from the shock of abrupt withdrawal from an antidepressant) leads to mania and the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder.

Fourth sentence reads: “. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania.”

http://bipolar.about.com/b/2009/08/31/bipolar-depression-and-antidepressants.htm

Bipolar Depression and Antidepressants

Monday August 31, 2009

My first psychiatric diagnosis was major depression, and my first psychiatric medication was Prozac. It was prescribed by my GP, not by a psychiatrist. I had a one-week follow-up visit, and then I was turned loose. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania. Someone even called me “the poster child for Prozac.” This was in 1994, and I wasn’t diagnosed with bipolar disorder until 1999, after another antidepressant did a similar thing.

What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?

590 total views, no views today

PAXIL TRIAL: Glaxo Executive’s Memo Suggested Burying Drug Studies (Update4)

An executive of GlaxoSmithKline Plc, the world’s second-biggest drugmaker, talked about burying negative studies linking its antidepressant drug Paxil to birth defects, according to a company memo introduced at a trial.
“If neg, results can bury,” Glaxo executive Bonnie Rossello wrote in a 1997 memo on what the company would do if forced to conduct animal studies on the drug. The memo was read during opening statements in the trial of a lawsuit brought by the family of a child born with heart defects.

The Philadelphia trial is the first of more than 600 cases alleging that London-based Glaxo knew Paxil caused birth defects and hid those risks to pump up profits.

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): In my small church congregation in Utah (maybe 100 families) there were two cases of SSRIs birth defects that I was aware of. In one case the mother was on Paxil and the other was a mother on Prozac. Both babies had to have heart surgery at birth or not long after. Because of that the number of 600 cases that have been filed is no surprise to me at all other than the number seems small in comparrison.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20670001&sid=ae8Ie3hNoafw

Glaxo Executive’s Memo Suggested Burying Drug Studies (Update4)
Share | Email | Print | A A A

By Jef Feeley and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Sept. 15 (Bloomberg) — An executive of GlaxoSmithKline Plc, the world’s second-biggest drugmaker, talked about burying negative studies linking its antidepressant drug Paxil to birth defects, according to a company memo introduced at a trial.

“If neg, results can bury,” Glaxo executive Bonnie Rossello wrote in a 1997 memo on what the company would do if forced to conduct animal studies on the drug. The memo was read during opening statements in the trial of a lawsuit brought by the family of a child born with heart defects.

The Philadelphia trial is the first of more than 600 cases alleging that London-based Glaxo knew Paxil caused birth defects and hid those risks to pump up profits. The drug, approved for U.S. use in 1992, generated about $942 million in sales last year, 2.1 percent of Glaxo’s total revenue.

The family of Lyam Kilker claims Glaxo withheld information from consumers and regulators about the risk of birth defects and failed to properly test Paxil. Kilker’s mother, Michelle David, blames Paxil for causing life-threatening heart defects in her 3-year-old son.

Glaxo officials urged scientists to withhold information about Paxil’s risks from a paper laying out the company’s “core safety philosophy” for the drug, said Sean Tracey, a lawyer for Kilker and David, in his opening statement in the trial.

“They said if there’s any doubt, take it out,” Tracey told jurors. “They do not want to scare anybody. It’s a very competitive marketplace. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry.”

‘Rare Thing’

Glaxo executives contend that the boy’s heart defect wasn’t caused by Paxil, Chilton Varner, one of the company’s lawyers, told jurors today in her opening statement. In court filings, Glaxo has said it appropriately tested and marketed the antidepressant drug.

“When Lyam Kilker was born in 2005, GSK had not received notice” of his specific type of heart defect in connection with Paxil use, Varner said. “The numbers will tell you the defect is a rare thing.”

The Paxil label at that time reported about animal studies, “including the rate of deaths,” she said.

Glaxo didn’t target pregnant women and its sales force didn’t use strong-arm tactics to push prescriptions, Varner said. “Whatever the marketing was, it played no role in Ms. David’s doctors’ decision to prescribe Paxil or Ms. David’s decision” to take the drug, she said.

Rat Studies

Glaxo officials purchased the compound sold as Paxil from a Danish company that had done animal studies showing young rats died after taking low doses of the drug, Tracey said in his opening statement.

One of the company’s scientists noted in internal documents in 1980 that information in the rat studies suggested Paxil “could be” a cause of birth defects, Tracey said. Still, the drugmaker refused for almost 20 years to do studies on why the young rats died, he added.

Tracey told jurors they would see documents in the trial that the company hadn’t turned over to regulators or congressional investigators. “You are going to see docs that have never seen light of day before,” he said.

For example, Tracey pointed to a 1998 internal review by Glaxo of all reports of side effects tied to Paxil and officials found “an alarmingly high number” of birth-defect reports. Even with those concerns, the report was never turned over to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and “the alarming language” was deleted from it, the lawyer said.

In 2001, the company received a letter from a woman who used Paxil during her pregnancy and decided to abort her fetus after tests showed it had birth defects, Tracey said.

Internal Report

In analyzing the woman’s case, Glaxo officials concluded in an internal report that it was “almost certain” the fetus’s birth defects were caused by his mother’s Paxil use, the family’s lawyer added. Still, the company didn’t turn over its analysis to the FDA or beef up the drug’s warning label, Tracey said.

It wasn’t until after the FDA ordered Glaxo and other makers of antidepressants in 2003 to do more safety studies on their products that Glaxo officials publicly acknowledged that Paxil increased the risk of birth defects, Tracey said.

The lawyer for David, a college nursing student who was a former cheerleader for the National Basketball Association’s Philadelphia 76ers, told jurors that Glaxo hid Paxil’s problems to protect its profits.

Paxil is “the No. 1 asset to this day this company has ever owned,” the attorney said.

‘Quite Different’

Varner said she will present “quite different” evidence on animal tests tied to Paxil.

“The animal testing did not suggest Paxil caused birth defects,” Varner said. The FDA considered the tests when it approved the drug for use by U.S. consumers in 1992, she said.

When Glaxo officials considered offering Paxil for sale in Japan, internal records show executives worried in 1994 they might have to do more safety testing on the antidepressant, said Dr. David Healy, an Irish psychiatrist testifying as an expert for Kilker’s family in the case.

It may be the “type of study we wish to avoid,” Jenny Greenhorn, an official in Glaxo’s international regulatory affairs unit, said in a memo.

Glaxo also is fighting suits in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. over claims that Paxil, also known by the generic name paroxetine, causes homicidal and suicidal behavior. The company has settled some suicide claims, though terms of the settlements haven’t been released.

New York Settlement

In 2004, the drugmaker agreed to pay the state of New York $2.5 million to resolve claims that officials suppressed research showing Paxil may increase suicide risk in young people. The settlement also required Glaxo to publicly disclose the studies.

The company’s provision for legal and other non-tax disputes as of June 30 was 1.7 billion pounds ($2.8 billion), the company said in a July 22 regulatory filing that didn’t mention the Paxil litigation.

“We do not disclose our legal reserves for any specific litigation matter,” Glaxo spokesman Kevin Colgan said earlier this month.

Glaxo American depositary receipts, each representing two ordinary shares, fell 68 cents, or 1.7 percent, to $38.76 in New York Stock Exchange composite trading today. Glaxo fell 14 pence, or 1.2 percent, to 1,175.5 pence in London.

The case is Kilker v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. dba GlaxoSmithKline, 2007-001813, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

To contact the reporters on this story: Jef Feeley in Philadelphia jfeeley@bloomberg.net; Margaret Cronin Fisk in Southfield, Michigan, at mcfisk@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated: September 15, 2009 17:03 EDT

778 total views, no views today

PROZAC: Woman Threatens State Patrolman: Missouri

HOW SAD!!! Reminds me of a talk I had with parents in Louisiana just last week who are completely overwhelmed dealing with a daughter with similar problems – ALL BECAUSE OF THE WIDESPREAD PRESCRIBING OF THESE DEADLY AND VERY ADDICTIVE PRESCRIPTION DRUGS!!!! They know she can get them from just about any doctor around.
Doctors have truly become our biggest drug pushers in this country! What on earth are we doing to our children?!!! How can so many families be left alone to deal with this – never knowing from one minute to the next if they are going to find their child unresponsive and dying due to yet another overdose of these drugs?
This country is in SO MUCH trouble and it has NOTHING to do with any outside threat to our nation – it is within.
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac (ETC): Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare! & Audio: Help! I Can’t Get Off
My Antidepressant/Antipsychotic, ect. ()
Paragraphs three & four read:  “According to the criminal complaint, when Parsley made contact with West  ‘her speech was slurred and her eyes were bloodshot and glassy.’  He adds that he did not notice an odor of intoxicants on her.”SSRI Stories note:  “

 

“West reportedly admitted she had taken Xanax and Prozac at 6 a.m. After failing sobriety tests, West was placed under arrest.”

Hostility”  is listed as an Infrequent, but not Rare, reaction to Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

558 total views, no views today

Lori White – Prozac for 2 1/2 years

Hi, my name is Lori White. I live in Sandy, Utah, and am a mother of 5 children, and grandmother of 7.

After being married for 12 years, I became a single mom for the next 9 years, during which time I had 4 teenagers at the same time. Depression runs in my family, and after a very difficult divorce, I found myself spending a lot of time in bed, especially when the children were in school. It was hard to cope with life, and I cried easily and found it difficult to stop crying.

Eventually I found a wonderful man and remarried, but every time there was a problem with one of the children, I would sink back into a depression. If I dropped the children off at school and one of them said, “Duh, Mom!” , I would shrink into myself, feel very incapable, and wonder what I had done to have my children hate me so much!

My doctor took pity on me, and put me on Prozac 8 years ago. When I was on the medication, I felt wonderful! I had NO problems!! And neither did anyone else! I was not affected by anyone else’s sad life or situations, and didn’t, couldn’t, cry.

After being on the medication for 6 years, I was introduced to a wonderful product, Classic, made by the Reliv company. After taking it for 6 months, I decided to go off the Prozac, which I did over a 3 week period. I found that I could cry again, could sympathize with others, and feel sad, but it didn’t last–I could stop crying, and I could feel happy again when I chose to.

I have been off Prozac now for 2 1/2 years, and just don’t have the cloud of gloom sitting on my shoulder that I had before going on it. When something sad or difficult happens in my life, it doesn’t bury me–I may cry, go to bed really feeling down, but when I wake up in the morning, I am fine–able to cope and put the problem in perspective.

Sincerely,
Lori

1,381 total views, no views today

Antidepressant Romance Fuels “Premedicated” Murder

Note From Ann Blake-Tracy: I must say that in the 20 years I have been specializing in adverse reactions to antidepressants and lecturing and writing about these drugs this is possibly the best article I have ever read on the overall problem with antidepressants!! EXCELLENT WORK!!!
The only thing I might have added is that the hypothesis behind the serotonin THEORY (everyone keeps forgetting it is a theory and not a fact) is backwards. According to research serotonin is elevated in depression, anxiety, violence, mania, psychosis, etc. NOT low. What is low is the ability to metabolize serotonin.
Now enjoy the article! As I said, it is excellent!!
Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

Website: www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare
& CD or audio tape on safe withdrawal: “Help! I Can’t Get
Off My Antidepressant!”
Order Number:

August 17th, 2009

From The Desk of The People’s Chemist:

Are antidepressant’s a silent killer? Read more to learn how to avoid “Premedicated Murder.” Then visit my blog at http://www.thepeopleschemist.com/blog to leave your comments. I want to hear your voices on this! This is one of the most important articles I’ve ever written. Invest 6 minutes into your health by reading this.

Antidepressant Romance Fuels “Premedicated” Murder

By Shane “The People’s Chemist” Ellison

I wish medicine wasn’t so damn complicated. If it weren’t, people would see how Big Pharma cleverly plays prescription cupid to hook the masses into an antidepressant romance. Fueled by dreamy ads, sexy actors, and medical experts who get paid to give pharmaceutical fellatio, the romance has grown into a full-fledged orgy.

Antidepressants are among the best selling drugs, yet not one single diagnostic test supports their effectiveness. Romance makes for great business. But, are patients getting the love they deserve or are they facing another life threatening disaster akin to the Vioxx fiasco (killing an estimated 30,000 people who could have just used aspirin)? Perhaps the chemical facts behind antidepressants will give way to reality and help Americans sever ties to the deadly affair.

Life can be a bitch at times. Everyone knows it and Big Pharma profits from it. To answer our cries for happiness, they sell us a slew of molecules ripe with supposed happy atoms purported to elicit wanton pleasure. It’s a pipe dream. Like a parent who doesn’t like their daughter dating drug reps or psychiatrists, the FDA started using Black Box Warnings to inform us that, “Antidepressants, compared to placebo, increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children in short term studies.” Psychiatrists quickly refuted this.

Massaging our fears, Dr. McAllister-Williams of the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University publicly insisted that “I believe they work and have an acceptable risk: benefit ratio for many patients.” Taking his cue, psychiatrists from around the world did what they do best: Ignore scientific ethics and get on their knees for Big Pharma.

In a vulgar display of medical ineptitude, prescribing habits surged. From 1996 to 2006, use of antidepressants increased 50% among children, 73% among adults and a ghastly 100% among the elderly – so much for Black Box Warnings. Why not rename them Profit Warnings? As prescribing habits have surged, so has antidepressant reality.

The so called disease of a “serotonin” chemical imbalance among depressed patients has never been proven. The Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience recently reminded doctors that, “Brain serotonin cannot be directly measured” and that even in the deceased, “Serotonin levels are unstable, within 24 hours of death.” Therefore, “direct evidence that serotonin is low in depressed persons is unavailable.”

Panicked, psychiatry hypothesized yet another cause of a chemical imbalance: Bad genes. Apparently, select people (basically anyone with a heartbeat) have a defective gene that makes them susceptible to depression – and drugs, drugs and more drugs can save them from the scourge of sadness. Bio-babble like “alleles” and “transporter genes” were thrown around like condoms at a high school pep rally. The jargon confused everyone. And in their dizzy stupor, most were convinced that it must mean one thing: antidepressants are the Holy Grail to attaining happiness. Psychiatry was once again renewed with the stench of pharmaceutical pheromones. But it didn’t last.

Thanks to scientific methodology, the industry was slapped with the facts. The New York Times delivered the blow and wrote, “One of the most celebrated findings in modern psychiatry – that a single gene helps determine one’s risk of depression in response to a divorce, a lost job or another serious reversal – has not held up to scientific scrutiny.”

You don’t need science to disprove the antiquated, reductionist propaganda surrounding the chemical imbalance theory. You only need the common sense of a child.

The human brain floats in thousands, billions or maybe even trillions of brain chemicals – all working in orchestra like unison to confer proper brain function. Even serotonin exists not as a single molecule, but instead as an ever changing chemical cascade of 5-htp, niacin, L-tryptophan, quinolinate, kynurenine and more. You’d have to be Paris Hilton or a psychiatrist to miss this logic and adhere to the simplistic serotonin imbalance theory.

With no such thing as a chemical imbalance or “depression inducing genes,” psychiatry did what any organization would do in the face of impending demise: Get the U.S Government to do their dirty work.

Today, an insidious collusion between Big Pharma and Big Government is doling out drugs paid for by our tax dollars to foster children, to our U.S. Troops, and to the elderly at breakneck speeds. With so many being drugged, a harsh reality is emerging: Antidepressant romance fuels “premedicated murder.”

While researching my upcoming book, Over-The-Counter Natural Cures (SourceBooks, October), I uncovered stories of horrific suicide and rage that occurred after being medicated with antidepressants. But none more disturbing than the Chris Wood story. Doped up on his prescribed cocktail of antidepressants – all three of them – he shot his 33 year old wife Francie and their three children – Chandler, 5, Gavin, 4, and Fiona, 2. Shockingly, in his drug damaged mind, they weren’t “dead enough” and gruesome decapitation followed. Afterwards, he picked up a shotgun and killed himself. This isn’t an isolated incident.

Among our US troop, suicide and rage is at an all time high – in direct correlation to mass prescribing. The same trend exists among teens as seen by the ever growing act of spraying classmates with bullets. Psychiatrists don’t seem to be alarmed with these trends, or at all interested in seeing the obvious correlations. In an attempt to “leave no American un-medicated,” they encourage subjective mental screening tests for the rest of us as a means of converting healthy people into psychiatric patients.

Psychiatry wants to position antidepressants as the cure for the premedicated violence. So to counter the growing evidence that their drugs are the cause, they insist that, “The only evidence that would be acceptable is the demonstration in a double blind trial that a difference in suicide rates was consistently seen. There is no evidence at all for a differential suicide attempt rate with antidepressants. Suicidal thoughts are an integral part of depression.” Here comes the backhand.

Writing for the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. Joel Kauffman elucidates that combined clinical trials on antidepressants show five times the risk of suicide among the treated compared to placebo.

The suicide/aggression trend is not inexplicable from a chemistry viewpoint. Using the latest cloning techniques and laboratory methods, it’s been shown that antidepressants elicit “neurotransmitter hijacking.” This may be partially responsible for the mental state that causes a person to gruesomely murder their loved ones, then put a shotgun to their chin and pull the trigger.

Once swallowed, antidepressants sail past the blood brain barrier and congregate on top of “neurotransmitter recyclers.” This can prevent the cellular “recycling factories” from activating previously used neurotransmitters like serotonin or any of its chemical cousins. With nowhere to go, the inactive brain compounds get “hijacked” by recycling facilities found in other regions of the brain. This would be similar to a square peg being shoved into a round hole. As shown by Baylor College of Medicine, the recycling facilities of key neurotransmitters, like dopamine (round), begin to retrieve serotonin (square) into dopamine vesicles. A dastardly consequence ensues.

Commenting on the hijacking, CNN publicized that, “Antidepressant drugs actually create a perilous brain imbalance.” And Psychiatric Times hypothesized that blocking transporters on cell bodies could drop neurotransmitter levels in the synapse. Is it true?

To measure if neurotransmitter hijacking leads to an empty synapse, you can simply look for clinical manifestations of poor neurotransmitter function (like Parkinson’s disease, which is due to poor output of dopamine) among antidepressant users. As far back as 1995, the American Journal of Medicine showed that 37% of all prescriptions for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease are due to Psychiatric drug use. Case closed. These antidepressant actions are the exact opposite of the claimed “neurotransmitter boosting” actions purported by most doctors!

Once neurotransmitter hijacking takes place, pharmacopossession (due to poor neurotransmitter function) may also set in. As patients come fully under the spell of antidepressants, the brain can become so scrambled that all normal reality and reason are overwritten by a new confusing and violent agenda. A new personality arises – one with homicidal and suicidal tendencies. And for an ever increasing number of antidepressant users, these tendencies are manifesting as premedicated murder – the deliberate killing as a result of being medicated in advance.

Unbalanced by drugs, the brain of an antidepressant user faces a slew of mind altering outcomes. What kind? What was Chris Wood thinking and feeling prior to committing premedicated murder of his family while pharmacopossessed? To answer these questions just go back to the beginning of this article and read the “profit warning” that comes with every Prozac prescription. It’s all there in black and white.

Even though the FDA “compels” drug companies to warn the public about antidepressant risks, their “death grip” on the medical industry has kept doctors and patients from knowing the real extent of the danger. Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association said that “Pharma’s influence on medicine is so blatant now you’d have to be deaf, blind and dumb not to see it.” I guess psychiatrists are all three since they continue to ignore science and romance the masses with promises of happiness courtesy of antidepressants.

Before your doctor gives you an antidepressant, ask him to read you the Black Box Warning that comes with your prescription. This will ensure that the potential romance quickly gives way to reality and that you don’t succumb to premedicated murder.

About the Author

Shane Ellison’s entire career has been dedicated to the study of molecules – how they give life and how they take from it. He was a two-time recipient of the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Grant for his research in biochemistry and physiology. He is a best selling author, holds a master’s degree in organic chemistry, and has first-hand experience in drug design. Learn to get lean fast like is Mom (photos included) at http://www.ampmfatloss.com

2,133 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: 81 Year Old Man Kills Wife & Self: En…

Note From Ann Blake-Tracy: I do not know if I can tolerate reading another one of these stories!
This last week I went to the Iowa State Fair for the first time with my daughter and her family who were visiting. While riding the trolley through the fair the man sitting across from me asked an elderly couple as they got off how many years they had been together.
They answered that it was 53 years. And he wished them the best for their next 53 years together.
They smiled and said “Thank you.”
As we drove on I looked at the man across from me and said, “As long as neither of them take an antidepressant they should do okay.” And I went on to share with them how many of the absolutely horrifying reports we are getting of elderly couples, married for many years, killing one another.
I then returned home to open this report of yet another horrific tragedy for a couple who had been married a few years longer than the couple I had just met on the trolley  . . . there is just no excuse for this to continue! How sad! I is NORMAL for a man who has worked all of his life to become depressed if he has to sell his business. It is NOT a reason to medicate him!
What an absolutely horrific way to end a life of 60 years together. I hope their children know what really happened in the loss of their parents instead of one woman I met after one of my lectures who came forward crying. As she reached me she said, “I cannot thank you enough for helping me to finally have answers to why my father killed my mother and then himself 20 years ago while taking one of the older antidepressants!”
Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

Website: www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare
& CD or audio tape on safe withdrawal: “Help! I Can’t Get
Off My Antidepressant!”
Order Number:

Paragraph seven reads:  “The court heard how Mr Mann became depressed after he sold his business in 2000 and from 2002 to 2005 was placed on anti-depressants, and again in 2008 after a reoccurrence of the mental illness.”

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/Depressed-pensioner-bludgeoned-wife-to.5548006.jp

Depressed pensioner bludgeoned wife to death before drowning himself

Published Date:
12 August 2009
By Charles Heslett

A pensioner bludgeoned his wife of almost 60 years to death before drowning himself in the bath.

Police discovered the body of retired sales rep Doreen Mann, 80, sprawled in the living room of the house she shared with husband Kenneth.

The retired factory owner, 81, was found dead upstairs face down in a bath full water wearing only his vest and underpants.

Officers took away a hammer, a craft knife and another knife from the scene at Foxroyd Lane, Thornhill Edge, Dewsbury, after the alarm was raised by a visiting mental health nurse on December 23 last year (2008].

An investigation was launched at the time by West Yorkshire Police’s Homicide & Murder Inquiry Team.

But Detective Sergeant Ian Lawrie told Wednesday’s inquest at Huddersfield Coroner’s Court that no-one else was being sought in connection with the death of the couple, who were both born in Leeds and had been married for 57 years.

The court heard how Mr Mann became depressed after he sold his business in 2000 and from 2002 to 2005 was placed on anti-depressants, and again in 2008 after a reoccurance of the mental illness.

On December 18, 2008, he and his wife were visited by psychiatrist Dr Vinood Shukla and a psychiatric nurse, the court heard.

A psychiatric nurse came to the red-bricked home called Kendoreen, where the couple had lived for 21 years, at 2.30pm on December 23.

After getting no answer from the front door apart from the couple’s barking collie dog, the nurse saw a bathroom light on and called police.

Detectives found the two knives and the hammer close to Mrs Mann’s body.

Her cause of death was later found to be a blow to her head and cut wounds to her neck and forearms.

Mr Mann’s corpse was found in an upstairs bathroom, face down in a full bath – his cause of death was given as self-drowning.

Barbara Moore told the inquest three weeks before her sister’s death Doreen had said she feared her husband might harm her.

West Yorkshire Coroner Roger Whittaker described the deaths as a “double tragedy”.

He recorded a verdict that Mrs Mann was unlawfully killed and that her husband drowned.

Mr Whittaker said he was satisfied that the balance of Mr Mann’s mind was disturbed at the time of his death and “that imbalance…was present at the time of the death of his wife“.

Mr Whittaker added that Mr Mann had given no indication on December 18 that he intended to harm his wife and that Mrs Mann had raised no similar concerns.

But the coroner said lessons “had been learned” by the mental health trust involved.

A South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust spokeswoman said: “The Trust re-iterates its sincere sympathies to the family and others affected by these tragic deaths.

“The circumstances have been thoroughly investigated, and we are grateful to the family for their input into this.

“Sadly, we cannot change the tragic events that happened but we can learn from them and a number of changes have been made as a result.”

These included: Improved systems for referrals between services and exchange of information; Improved training for staff on assessing risk; Improved record keeping following home visits.

The spokeswoman added: “The investigation findings have been shared with the family and we are continuing to offer support as appropriate.”

The full article contains 574 words and appears in n/a newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

  • Last Updated: 12 August 2009 4:14 PM
  • Source: n/a
  • Location: Leeds

1,152 total views, no views today