PROZAC/SSRIs: Problematic [DEADLY!] For Bipolars: Dr. David Gratzer

NOTE FROM DR. TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

Problematic???!!!!!” How about using the term DEADLY? How did
we get to the point that using SSRIs is the standard “treatment” for Bipolar
patients when initially doctors would not prescribe them due to their strong
potential to induce Bipolar?! Time has certainly proven the initial fears to be
true when the number of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by a whopping
4000% from 1996 to 2004!! No wonder every third person you meet any more has the
Bipolar label!
The simple truth of the matter is (as I discuss at length in
my DVD “Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?”) that antidepressants –
especially the SSRI antidepressants – are by far the BIGGEST CAUSE on
this planet of Bipolar Disorder! And doctors prescribing these drugs as
“treatment” for Bipolar is not only unethical, it is downright criminal! Why
wouldn’t the placebo outperform the drug?! Placebos don’t CAUSE Bipolar Disorder
– Antidepressants do!
Paragraph 14 reads:  “As a physician myself, I know a
thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When I was in
residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs
. It turned out that

Prozac intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.”

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columns/Manhattan-Moment/Medicine-isn_t-perfect_-Obamacare-is-even-less-perfect-8582816-72875022.html

Dr. David Gratzer: Medicine isn’t perfect, Obamacare is even less
perfect

By: Dr. David Gratzer
Op-Ed Contributor
November 25, 2009

Pay for the blue pill that works, not the red one that
doesn’t. That’s the president’s simple prescription for improving American
health care, one that relies on government panels and committees to set
guidelines for doctors and patients alike.

At least, that’s the
theory.

The theory met messy reality last week when the U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force recommended that women in their 40s shouldn’t get
mammograms. But the secretary of health and human services — who, incidentally,
oversees this panel — thinks women probably should. And the American Cancer
Society believes that they definitely should; major private insurance companies,

for the record, will continue to fund the tests.

Confused
yet?

Recommendation from a largely unknown government panel hardly seems
like typical material for national headlines. But when it involves breast cancer
and the announcement is made in the heat of debate over health reform, people
are — understandably — concerned.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task
Force, as it turns out, is not part of a larger Obama White House rationing
conspiracy, as some would have it. Task force members were appointed by
President Bush, and they voted on this recommendation before Obama’s
inauguration.

As for cost considerations, the task force had none:
Members are mandated not to weigh dollars and cents when considering the risk
and benefits of recommendations.

That’s not to suggest that their
conclusion isn’t highly controversial. For starters, it seems counterintuitive:
Early screening for cancer makes sense.

No wonder, then, that a full 87
percent of Americans believed that routine scanning was “almost always a good
idea” in a 2004 poll published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

Today, American panels and doctors groups are moving away
from the “scan first, ask questions later” philosophy. We aren’t the only ones
having second thoughts.

In Japan, all newborns were screened for

neuroblastoma starting in 1984, but the program was scrapped a few years ago
when more babies died from unnecessary surgeries than the obscure
cancer.

For many, such reversals are deeply unsettling, a reminder that
medicine is far from an exact science.

“The history of medicine is a
record not only of brilliant success and stunning progress,” Theodore Dalrymple,
a British physician, wrote in 2002. “It is also a litany of mistaken ideas and
discarded treatments, some of which came to appear absurd or downright dangerous
after having once been hailed as unprecedented advances.”

As a physician
myself, I know a thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When
I was in residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs. It turned out that Prozac
intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.

For those on the left, the answer to the chaos of medicine is to
establish government panels. With Obamacare, for instance, White House officials
propose a commission to cut hundreds of billions from Medicare by improving the
quality of care.

How? By setting up an Independent Medicare Advisory
Commission that would guide clinical decisions for doctors and patients
alike.

The controversy over breast cancer screening, however, shows the
political and practical limitations of this one-size-fits-all approach: Medical
organizations have difficulty in setting and agreeing upon clinical guidelines,
and patients are apt to resent mandates from bureaucrats.

Leaving health
verdicts in the hands of centralized authorities is a sure way to keep making
mistakes in a field where re-examination and reversal are an unavoidable
reality.

David Gratzer, a physician, is a senior fellow at the
Manhattan Institute and author of “Why Obama’s Government Takeover of Health
Care Will Be a Disaster” (Encounter Books,
2009).

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PROZAC: Suicide Attempt: Teen: New York

Paragraph three reads:  “His father was an abusive heroin
addict, whose crazy, rebellious streak he emulated. A wild kid who was beaten by
his stepfather and uncle, Cage got into drugs and was committed by his mom to a
psychiatric hospital as a teen. There, he was among the first test
cases for
Prozac, and he attempted suicide with
shoelaces
and the tape from a
Big Daddy Kane cassette. Such trials are
recounted throughout his catalog, and his persona­a decadent, nihilistic,
drug-addled MC­was cultivated in his single “Agent Orange” and 2002 debut,
Movies for the Blind.”

http://www.dallasobserver.com/2009-11-26/music/rapper-cage-takes-off-in-a-new-direction-whether-anyone-follows-or-not/

Rapper Cage Takes Off in a New Direction, Whether Anyone Follows or
Not

By Chris
Parker

Published on November 25, 2009 at 1:52pm

Details:

Cage performs with Less Than Jake on Wednesday, December 9, at the
Granada Theater.

Just because an artist evolves doesn’t mean his
fans will. So, while Chris
Palko
, aka Cage, may have experienced a personal epiphany that’s taken his
music in a new direction, he doesn’t blame his fans for not wanting to come
along for the ride.

See, the rapper’s latest, Depart From Me, is
hardly a rap album at all. Rife with indie-tronic synth and raging guitars
(courtesy of ex-

Hatebreed guitarist Sean
Martin
), it follows up on the direction hinted at by his Darryl
Palumbo
2005 collaboration, “Shoot Frank,” off his second album, Hell’s
Winter
. Only, this time, there are hardly any beats at all. There’s also a
more positive tone­though only slightly more positive­which is
equally bewildering given the darkness Cage sings about.

His father was
an abusive heroin addict, whose crazy, rebellious streak he emulated. A wild kid
who was beaten by his stepfather and uncle, Cage got into drugs and was
committed by his mom to a psychiatric hospital as a teen. There, he was among
the first test cases for Prozac,
and he attempted suicide with shoelaces and the tape from a Big
Daddy Kane
cassette. Such trials are recounted throughout his catalog, and
his persona­a decadent, nihilistic, drug-addled MC­was cultivated in his
single “Agent Orange” and 2002 debut, Movies for the Blind.

He
dropped the drugs and degrading sexual undertone on Hell’s Winter, but
his latest even attempts to short-circuit some of the self-hate and angst. It’s
expressed on tracks like the punky “Fat Kids Need an Anthem,” which keenly
dissects his former food issues, and “Captain Bumout,” which repudiates his old
image, suggesting “there’s more than being in a club, getting drunk, one of us
throwing up and waking up like we’re in love.” One catalyst for both the change
in sound and expression is his friend and protégé Camu Tao, who died of cancer
last year.

“After he passed away, my entire world fell apart,” Cage says.
“I had never been so wounded in my whole life. I had been through so much. I
felt like in life, as a little kid, gritting your teeth and clutching your
fists, you can take anything, but then the grown man just is
broken.”

But, really, the change began several years ago, when Cage and
his tour mates watched videos of their performances and became dissatisfied with
the stale elements of typical hip-hop.

“We saw ourselves walking back and
forth on the videotape, trying to say ho,” Cage recalls. “After a while, you get
tired of doing the same thing over and over. And, then, it’s either join in on
the reindeer games or start your own.”

They watched videos of Black
Flag
and Iggy
Pop
, trying to adopt rock mannerisms. The change in music comes out of the
same impulse, as Depart From Me represents an attempt to bring the sound
in line with the stage show. To that end, Hatebreed’s Martin joins Cage and his
DJ on tour, playing guitar and keyboard parts. And, as such, even old songs are
getting a facelift.

Meanwhile, Cage’s spirit has already gotten one.
Watching his friend die of cancer made his bleak attitude hard to
sustain.

“I couldn’t come in and say, ‘Hey, listen to my songs. I know
you’re dying, but listen to my songs about wanting to die,'” he says. “I didn’t
know what to do, so I started making songs that were a little
happier.”

While he understands his fans’ frustration with the new

direction, he couldn’t care less about pissy blog rants or reviews.

“When
I was 16 years old, I was selling crack and was a buck-fifty, in people’s faces
with box cutters. I wasn’t sitting on the Internet, telling people they’re
faggots because I don’t like their music,” Cage says. “People don’t get it. The
record’s called Depart From Me, dude. You don’t get
it?”

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PROZAC: Suicide: Woman Set Herself on Fire: England

Paragraph nine reads:  “By this time she was also
taking Prozac
and diazepam and had been given
several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/4749233.Brighton_mum_who_set_herself_on_fire_was_depressed_after_redundancy__inquest_hears/

Brighton mum who set herself on fire was depressed after redundancy,
inquest hears

2:33pm Thursday 19th November 2009

A Brighton mother-of-two committed suicide by dousing herself in barbecue lighter
fluid and setting it alight after battling with a chronic alcohol problem and
depression since being made redundant, an inquest heard today.

Birgit Bartlett’s body was found by her daughter in the garden of her home in
Hollingbury Crescent on August 8.

An inquest at Brighton County Court
heard the 51-year-old died of suffocation after inhaling the flames which
enveloped her body.

Pathologist Mark Taylor, who carried out a
post-mortem examination, said she had an acute thermal injury to her windpipe
and believed she would have died “rapidly”.

Mr Taylor said she had low
levels of alcohol in her blood, equal to having consumed around four units, but
added that he found excess fat around her liver, “in keeping with her history of
chronic alcohol abuse,” although this did not contribute to her death.

Mrs Bartlett’s husband, Michael, said his wife began drinking heavily
when she was made redundant in 2007 and he and his adult son and daughter would
often find empty bottles of wine hidden around the house.

In 2008 she
stopped drinking when she became employed as an admin assistant, but took it up
again when she lost the job in February of this year.

This time her
alcohol abuse was worse, and she took to drinking a bottle of spirits a day. Mr
Bartlett said the family confiscated her credit cards and cheque book in a bid
to stop her.

By this time she was also taking Prozac and diazepam and
had been given several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.

During a visit to her GP in March she denied thoughts of suicide but
admitted she had been feeling low, before she was admitted to hospital in May
after setting fire to her duvet cover while in bed.

She suffered third
degree burns to her thigh and lower back and was referred to the local community
mental health team.

The inquest heard that German-born Mrs Bartlett had
no previous psychiatric problems but her sister had committed suicide six years
ago.

Psychiatrist Graham Walton said he saw Mrs Bartlett three times in
July but said he felt “she didn’t want to engage” with him.

He said he
did not think she seemed suicidal but “she did admit there was endless
drinking”.

Mr Bartlett said his wife underwent a detoxification
programme to try to stop her from drinking and said she felt “ashamed” of her
condition.

“She was petrified that somebody she knew would see her going
in or out,” he added.

In the days leading up to her death she told him,
“I’ll never find another job” and “I’m no good”, the inquest heard.

On

the day she died Mr Bartlett said he noticed she was missing so thought she
might have gone for a walk and he searched her local haunts. He arrived back at
the house at around 1.30pm to find police, fire engines and ambulances outside.

Detective Sergeant Helen Paine of Sussex
Police
told the inquest that officers were satisfied that there were no
suspicious circumstances surrounding Mrs Bartlett’s death.

Summing up,
Dr Karen Henderson, assistant deputy coroner for Brighton and Hove, said the
inquest had found “little evidence that she seriously wished to stop drinking”.

She added: “She was also offered a lot of help from social services, her
GP, and from substance misuse services. It is quite clear she did not wish to
engage with these services.

“The manner of her death is truly terrible
but we have heard evidence that her death would have been mercifully brief and
mercifully painless.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, she added: “I know
that the family did everything they possibly could to help Birgit,” and offered
them her condolences.

Mr Bartlett declined to comment on the hearing.

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SSRI Antidepressants Linked to Lactation Difficulties

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): The following
statement about the benefits of breastmilk are true. But when you are talking
about the benefits of breastmilk coming from a mother on SSRI antidepressants,
there is no basis for benefit from such contaminated milk. The baby is much
better off gathering milk from a mother who is drug free. The only additional
problem at that point is that if the baby survives and does not die from one of
the many horrific birth defects produced by these drugs they will then be
going cold turkey off one of these very addictive antidepressants. It would be
better to wean the baby slowly down off of the breast milk by giving smaller and
smaller amounts of the mother’s toxic contaminated milk while providing more and
more clean breast milk from a donor mom.

Let me give just one example of why I would say this: Over the weekend I
was able to visit once again with a mother of seven that I helped years ago
as she withdrew from her seven year use of Prozac. After she had been completely
off the drug for a year and a half she gave birth to her last child. When the
baby was three weeks old she was passing more blood than stool. Both the family
physician and the pediatrician agreed that it was the Prozac residue in the
mother’s breast milk that was eating away the baby’s intestinal lining to cause
the bleeding. They confirmed this by having the mother gather clean breast milk

to supplement her milk with. Almost immediately after mixing the milk half and
half the bleeding stopped. So, assisting a mother to breastfeed when her milk is
so contaminated may not be in the best interest of the baby after all.

_______________________________
Breastfeeding benefits both infants and mothers in many ways as breast milk
is easy to digest and contains antibodies that can protect infants from
bacterial and viral infections. The World Health Organization recommends that
infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. This
new study shows that certain common antidepressant drugs may be linked to a
common difficulty experienced by new mothers known as delayed secretory
activation, defined as a delay in the initiation of full milk secretion.
Public release date: 26-Jan-2010

Contact:
Aaron Lohr
alohr@endo-society.org
240-482-1380
The
Endocrine Society

Common antidepressant drugs linked to lactation difficulties in
moms

According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), women
taking commonly used forms of antidepressant drugs may experience delayed
lactation after giving birth and may need additional support to achieve their
breastfeeding goals.

Breastfeeding benefits both infants and mothers in many ways as breast milk
is easy to digest and contains antibodies that can protect infants from
bacterial and viral infections. The World Health Organization recommends that
infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. This
new study shows that certain common antidepressant drugs may be linked to a
common difficulty experienced by new mothers known as delayed secretory
activation, defined as a delay in the initiation of full milk secretion.

“The breasts are serotonin-regulated glands, meaning the breasts’ ability to
secrete milk at the right time is closely related to the body’s production and
regulation of the hormone serotonin,” said Nelson Horseman, PhD, of the
University of Cincinnati and co-author of the study. “Common antidepressant
drugs like fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine are known as selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs and while they can affect mood,
emotion and sleep they may also impact serotonin regulation in the breast,
placing new mothers at greater risk of a delay in the establishment of a full
milk supply.”

In this study, researchers examined the effects of SSRI drugs on lactation
using laboratory studies of human and animal cell lines and genetically modified
mice. Furthermore, an observational study evaluated the impact of SSRI drugs on
the onset of milk production in postpartum women. In this study of 431
postpartum women, median onset of lactation was 85.8 hours postpartum for the
SSRI-treated mothers and 69.1 hours for mothers not treated with SSRI drugs.
Researchers commonly define delayed secretory activation as occurring later than
72 hours postpartum.

SSRI drugs are very helpful medications for many moms, so understanding and
ameliorating difficulties moms experience can help them achieve their goals for
breastfeeding their babies,” said Horseman. “More human research is needed
before we can make specific recommendations regarding SSRI use during
breastfeeding.”

###

Other researchers working on the study include: Aaron Marshall, Laura
Hernandez and Karen Gregerson of the University of Cincinnati in Ohio; Laurie
Nommsen-Rivers of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio; Kathryn
Dewey of the University of California at Davis; and Caroline Chantry of the
University of California Davis Medical Center in Sacramento.

The article, “Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland
modulates secretory activation and involution,” will appear in the February 2010
issue of JCEM.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and
most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical
practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of
over 14,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than
100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied, and clinical
interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase,
Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit
our site at www.endo-society.org.

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PROZAC & 6 other drugs: Toxicology of Brittany Murphy, Actress: California

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Why would anyone be surprised at this sudden heart attack in a
32 year old with this combination of drugs? This is far too similar
a combination of prescriptions that young healthy soldiers are returning
home on and dying in their sleep.
______________________________
Sentence three reads:  ” Included in the drug list that
TMZ reported were Topamax, anti-seizure medication, Klonopin and Ativan for
anxiety and the pain relievers Klonopin, Ativan, Vicoprofen,
Hydrocodone
.  Also,  depression medication
Fluoxetine [PROZAC ] and
hypertension medication Propranolol.”

http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474977959263&grpId=3659174697243100&nav=Groupspace

Brittany Murphy’s autopsy report is on LOCKDOWN!  The
list of prescription drugs that were found in the house were leaked to TMZ and
made public.  Included in the drug list that TMZ reported were Topamax,
anti-seizure medication, Klonopin and Ativan for anxiety and the pain relievers

Klonopin, Ativan, Vicoprofen, Hydrocodone.  Also,
depression medication Fluoxetine and hypertension medication
Propranolol.

TMZ received notes laying out the timeline of
Brittany’s death on Sunday morning.  The information was apparently
confidential and was not authorized for the media to publish.  The
investigators don’t know where the information came from or how TMZ got a hold
of the information.

TMZ would not say where the information was
obtained.

The investigators are not confirming that the prescription drug
list that was leaked is the same as to what they found at the house.  The
investigators are now searching for whoever leaked the
information.

Toxicology tests may take 4-8 weeks to confirm exact cause
of death.  For now, Brittany has died from “natural” causes meaning there
is not visual trauma to her body leading to her death.

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PROZAC: 25 Year Old Woman Commits Suicide: England

Paragraph 6 reads:  “And she said they put her on a
course of Fluoxetine [Prozac]
an anti-depressant which has been linked in some instances
with side effects which can lead to patients wanting to
commit suicide.”

http://www.birminghampost.net/news/west-midlands-health-news/2009/10/29/redditch-mother-to-take-somerset-nhs-trust-to-court-over-daughter-s-suicide-65233-25039846/

Redditch mother to take Somerset NHS Trust to court over daughter’s
suicide

Oct
29 2009
by John Marsden, Birmingham Post

A mother is set to take legal action against a hospital trust she claims
failed to spot her daughter’s mental illness that resulted in her
death.

Beautician Tracy Thomas was left devastated when her oldest
daughter, Kimberley, hanged herself in her bedroom just two weeks before
Christmas.

She claims Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust failed to
help 25yearold Kimberley after she repeatedly threatened to commit suicide

when she moved to the region in 2004.

Mrs Thomas, who lives in Redditch,
Worcestershire, with her three children, said Kimberely had been suffering from
Bi-Polar Disorder.

Despite Kimberley’s plea for help, Mrs Thomas said
doctors did not see her as a threat to herself.

And she said they put her
on a course of Fluoxetine – an anti-depressant which has been linked in some
instances with side effects which can lead to patients wanting to commit
suicide.

Mrs Thomas said: “If Kim had been in Worcestershire I’m sure she
would have been sectioned and been given 24-hour care.

“But doctors in
Somerset didn’t want to know. They were more concerned with transferring
resources elsewhere.

“They simply failed to see the gravity of her
illness. Of course I want an apology from the hospital but no words or money
will ever bring my daughter back.”

Mrs Thomas has now approached Irwin
Mitchell solicitors and said she intends to sue the Trust for negligence. She
has also set up a Facebook website called Survivors of Family and Friends to
Suicide, in a bid to help people who have been affected by similar
tragedies.

A spokesman for Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
said: “We offer our condolences to Mrs Thomas for the tragic death of her
daughter.

“The Trust would refute any suggestion that we were negligent
or failed to diagnose Kimberley correctly.

“We will defend ourselves
against any legal action taken against us.”

In April, an inquest heard
how former Debenhams employee Ms Thomas, of Winchester Street, Taunton, hanged
herself after a series of relationships broke down. Somerset Partnership NHS
Foundation Trust received an excellent rating from the Care Quality Commission
for its treatment of mentally ill patients last year.

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PROZAC: Alcohol Cravings & Assault with Amnesia: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

Also applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic reactions.
________________________________

Sentences three through five read: “Flavell’s court-appointed attorney Neil Madden said Flavell takes Prozac and was drinking Captain Morgan rum Thursday. Madden said his client “doesn’t remember entering Massachusetts General Hospital. He remembers being with a friend and he remembers ending up in jail.’’

http://bostonist.com/2009/10/23/boston_blotter_sex_offender_homicid.php

Boston Blotter: Sex offender, homicide, robberies
Blotter siren
— A Level Three sex offender allegedly assaulted a woman in a Massachusetts General Hospital bathroom on Thursday. David C. Flavell was charged with assault with intent to rape and assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon and held without bail until a psychiatric evaluation next Tuesday. Flavell’s court-appointed attorney Neil Madden said Flavell takes Prozac and was drinking Captain Morgan rum Thursday. Madden said his client “doesn’t remember entering Massachusetts General Hospital. He remembers being with a friend and he remembers ending up in jail.’’ The victim is a Mass. General employee. Suffolk Assistant District Attorney David Deakin said Flavell has prior sex crimes convictions. [ Globe, Herald]

454 total views, 1 views today

PROZAC: State Representative Arrested for DUI & Bail Jumping: Wisconsin

Fourth paragraph from the end reads:  “A breath test
showed he had no alcohol in his system. Police found he had 55
tablets of naproxen, an anti-inflammatory used to control pain; 22 tablets
of fluoxetine, an anti-depressant commercially known as
Prozac;
and 25 tablets of an antibiotic.”

SSRI Stories
note:

http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/65563987.html

Wood could face expulsion

Wood accused of drug-related DUI, bailjumping in third case this
year

By Patrick Marley of the Journal
Sentinel

Posted: Oct. 22, 2009

Madison ­ State Rep.
Jeff Wood (I-Chippewa Falls) was charged Thursday with driving under the
influence of prescription drugs and bail jumping – raising his chances of
becoming only the second lawmaker to be expelled from the Legislature in 161
years.

Wood’s arrest Wednesday in Tomah marked the third time in less
than a year he was picked up on suspicion of driving under the influence of
alcohol or drugs. The arrests come as lawmakers try to crack down on drunken
driving.

Before Wood’s arrest Wednesday, Assembly Speaker Mike Sheridan
(D-Janesville) said he was reluctant to try to expel Wood. But he signaled his
attitude was changing in a statement Thursday.

“We must take a very hard
look at his case and determine if he is truly able to serve the people of his
district,” Sheridan said. “Rep. Wood must take responsibility and be held
accountable for his actions. . . . Rep. Wood has brought shame not only on
himself, but on the Wisconsin State Assembly.”

Gov. Jim Doyle on Thursday
told The Associated Press that Wood should resign.

“When you’re just
simply not providing the basic representation, you’ve got to acknowledge that
and step aside and allow somebody else to represent that district,” Doyle
said.

Wood, 40, was convicted of drunken driving in 1990 and
1991.

This January, he was charged in Columbia County with drunken
driving and possessing marijuana and drug paraphernalia. In September, he was

arrested in Marathon County on suspicion of driving under the influence of
anti-anxiety drugs and cold medicine. Charges in that case could be filed soon,
said Assistant District Attorney Laura Kohl.

Those two cases, as well as
Thursday’s case in Monroe County, could result in third, fourth and fifth
offenses of driving under the influence.

A fifth offense would be a
felony, which would force Wood out of the Legislature. But the three cases could
take months to resolve and stretch past the November 2010
election.

Thursday’s bailjumping charge stems from a condition of his
bail in Columbia County that required him to maintain absolute sobriety and
barred him from committing crimes. In Columbia County, he was charged with
possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and third offense
drunken driving.

Wood’s staff was not in his Capitol office Thursday and
did not return calls.

Expulsion to be reviewed

Sheridan soon will form a
committee of three Democrats and three Republicans that will review a resolution
by Rep. Steve Nass (R-Whitewater) to expel Wood. Nass introduced the resolution
in response to Wood’s Sept. 23 arrest in Marathon County.

Expelling him
would require a two-thirds vote of the Assembly.

The only lawmaker to be
expelled since Wisconsin became a state was Frank Raguse, a Milwaukee Socialist
who was removed in 1917 for refusing to retract statements his colleagues deemed
disloyal to the United States.

Wood’s attorney, Tracey Wood, said
lawmakers were acting prematurely in trying to remove the lawmaker. The Woods
are not related.

“People in our system are innocent until proven guilty
beyond a reasonable doubt,” she said. “It seems a little crazy to me to rush to
judgment.”

Blood tests will not be available for months in the two cases
where he is suspected of driving under the influence of drugs, she
said.

Wood was first elected as a Republican in 2002. He quit the party
in the summer of 2008, and in November became the first independent elected to
the Legislature since 1928.

“I’m not sure the people of the 67th
(Assembly District) are being served,” said Assembly Republican Leader Jeff
Fitzgerald of Horicon.

In September, Wood joined his colleagues in a
unanimous vote to make fourth offense driving under the influence a felony if it
occurs within five years of the third offense. Less than a week later, he was

arrested on what could be a fourth offense.

According to the complaint
filed Thursday in Monroe County Circuit Court, Wood was pulled over Wednesday
after another driver called to report she saw him weave out of his lane and into
oncoming traffic. She said he twice entered intersections on red lights, stopped
in the intersections and then backed up.

When officers pulled Wood over,
he struck the curb, drove back into traffic and then drove up onto the curb, the
complaint said. During field sobriety testing, he fell onto the back of his car
and lost his balance a second time.

A breath test showed he had no
alcohol in his system. Police found he had 55 tablets of naproxen, an
anti-inflammatory used to control pain; 22 tablets of fluoxetine, an
anti-depressant commercially known as Prozac; and 25 tablets of an
antibiotic.

He was released Thursday afternoon from the Monroe County
Jail after posting $1,000 bail in cash.

After his September arrest, Wood
said he had enrolled in an in-patient treatment program at a veterans hospital
in Minneapolis. He was later transferred to a program in Tomah, said Sheridan’s
office.

Wood was absent for Tuesday’s Assembly session, which his office
said was because he was in
treatment.

589 total views, 3 views today

PROZAC: Not Guilty of Assault Using Prozac Defense: Kansas

Paragraphs nine through twelve read:  “However, he
testified he believed
high dosages of Prozac,
an anti-depressant prescribed to him at the prison and jail, influenced
his behavior.”

“It made him feel like he wanted jump out
of his skin
, he said. Housworth told jurors he never intended to hurt
anyone.”

“During the time he’s spent in youth shelters, jails and
prisons, Housworth said he had nothing but “minor write-ups” until
he began taking Prozac in 40-milligram to 90-milligram
dosages at the local prison and jail.”

“He said he never stopped
taking the drug because he was 70 days shy of parole in June 2007, and then he

signed a parole agreement specifying he would take his
prescribed medications.”

Paragraphs fourteen and fifteen read:
“Dr. Mark Goodman, a local clinical psychologist who evaluated Housworth,
testified for the defense he believed the high dosage
of Prozac prescribed to Housworth at the prison and jail caused his aggressive
behavior.”

“Goodman said the recommended Prozac dosage for an
adult was 20 to 80 milligrams, and he believed the high dosages given to
Housworth, combined with Housworth’s “bipolar features” and “anger
history,” rendered him unable to reason
appropriately.”

http://www.hutchnews.com/Todaystop/trial2009-10-23T20-32-29

Saturday, October 24, 2009    4 : 14 PM

Meds defense a success

Former prisoner acquitted in batteries he blames on
Prozac.

By Darcy Gray The Hutchinson News dgray@hutchnews.com

A former Hutchinson Correctional Facility inmate charged with battering
correctional officers and another inmate told jurors this week “Prozac mania,”
from high dosages of the prescribed drug, caused his aggressive, impulsive
behavior.

The jurors agreed.

Andrew Housworth, 31, was found not

guilty Friday of five counts of battery against a correctional officer and two
counts of aggravated battery of a correctional officer and a fellow inmate.

During his trial this week before Reno County District Judge Tim
Chambers, Housworth admitted to spitting on correctional officers at the prison
and the Reno County jail in 2007.

He admitted to attacking a fellow
inmate at the Reno County jail in April 2008, hitting him and biting his cheek.

Although Housworth was charged with aggravated battery of an HCF officer
in September 2007 for allegedly choking the officer with his belly chain, or
restraint, he denied choking the officer. He told jurors he was first
“clotheslined” and pepper-sprayed by the officer before responding in
self-defense.

His attorney, Alice Osburn, noted there was time missing
from the prison surveillance video during the incident, in which Housworth
claimed he had been beaten.

Housworth also admitted during trial his
criminal history included aggravated assault, criminal threat and attempted
robbery.

However, he testified he believed high dosages of Prozac, an
anti-depressant prescribed to him at the prison and jail, influenced his
behavior.

It made him feel like he wanted jump out of his skin, he said.
Housworth told jurors he never intended to hurt anyone.

During the time
he’s spent in youth shelters, jails and prisons, Housworth said he had nothing
but “minor write-ups” until he began taking Prozac in 40-milligram to
90-milligram dosages at the local prison and jail.

He said he never
stopped taking the drug because he was 70 days shy of parole in June 2007, and
then he signed a parole agreement specifying he would take his prescribed
medications.

Housworth said his concerns about Prozac‘s effects on him
were ignored by local prison and jail staff. After an incident in which he
punched Reno County Jail Capt. Scott Powell in September 2008, Housworth said,
he was transferred to Lyons County jail, where they took him off Prozac in March
and he had not had a problem with officers since.

Dr. Mark Goodman, a
local clinical psychologist who evaluated Housworth, testified for the defense

he believed the high dosage of Prozac prescribed to Housworth at the prison and
jail caused his aggressive behavior.

Goodman said the recommended Prozac
dosage for an adult was 20 to 80 milligrams, and he believed the high dosages
given to Housworth, combined with Housworth’s “bipolar features” and “anger
history,” rendered him unable to reason appropriately.

A doctor at the
Larned State Hospital, however, testified for the prosecution that Housworth had
an anti-social personality and did not lack the mental state necessary to commit
the crimes.

Jurors were asked, regarding each charge, whether they
believed Housworth suffered a mental deficiency due to high dosages of Prozac

that “rendered him incapable” of criminal intent, or intending to commit the
crimes.

As the verdict was announced Friday, jurors announced “yes,”
they believed he suffered from the mental deficiency as to all charges except
for the aggravated battery charge in which Housworth was accused of choking the
prison officer.

Friday’s verdict represents the first time since 2003
such a defense has been successful in winning an acquittal.

In 2003,
Dale McCormick, of Sylvia, was acquitted after a jury decided his alleged bomb
threat at the Reno County Law Enforcement Center was the result of mental
defect, brought on by depression and a dosage change in McCormick’s mood
stabilizer.

In Housworth’s case, the jury foreperson told The News
jurors discussed at length all evidence in the case, including the doctors’
contradicting opinions. Jurors requested a read-back of witness testimony
Thursday night, so they took a break and continued deliberating Friday
morning.

Jurors felt Housworth was open and honest in talking about what
had happened, as well as his criminal history, she said. Housworth was willing
to talk about the incident with Powell, even though it was not charged against
him.

Following the verdict, Chambers ordered Housworth be committed to
the Larned State Hospital until he is no longer a danger.

Osburn
confirmed Housworth is also facing charges in Leavenworth County for battery of

a correctional officer.

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Prozac/SSRIs: Woman’s Symptoms Worsen Beyond Original Symptoms From Withdrawal

Page seven reads [in part]:  “My doc and I tried a lot of
other medications along the way, and I had all the classic side effects.  I
went hypomanic on the Prozac, so we added mood stabilizers
to even me out.  I lost interest in sex, so we tried another
antidepressant, Wellbutrin, to bring me back.  We switched,
jiggered, and recombined, looking for that perfect pickle.  But if one
thing didn’t give me a rash or panic attacks, then it made me gobble salty junk
food in the middle of the night.  I tried most of the majors, and burned
through their effects.  I got scrawny, then fat,
petrified, then out of control, sexless, then
sex-obsessed.”

“Eventually the dope just doesn’t work the way it used
to.  Even Klonipin needs a boost to keep hammering you.  And that’s
when they start referring to you in whispered tones as ‘medication-resistant’.”

So I ended up in the bin that
first time, to do some serious recalibration.  I was all used up.

In the space of a few years, I went from being just
another twenty-something have a good old-fashioned life crisis to being a
pscyhotropic junky.”

Page 280 [ 3rd paragraph] reads:  “I
know that when I go off medication I feel far worse than I ever felt
before I took it,
and I have never been able to stand the downside for
more than a few months, so I don’t know how long my brain
might take to recalibrate, if it can.”

http://www.amazon.com/Voluntary-Madness-Year-Found-Loony/dp/0670019712/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1252891043&sr=1-1

Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin
(Hardcover)

by Norah
Vincent

Norah Vincent (Author)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers
Weekly
Vincent’s first trip to a mental institution­to which the
writing of Self-Made Man drove her­convinced her that further
immersion would give her great material for a follow-up. The grand tour consists
of voluntary commitments to a hospital mental ward, a small private facility and
a boutique facility; but Vincent’s efforts to make a big statement about the
state of mental health treatment quickly give way to a more personal journey. An
attempt to wean herself off Prozac, for example, adds a greater sense of urgency
to her second research trip, while the therapists overseeing her final treatment
lead her to a major emotional breakthrough. Meanwhile, her fellow patients are
easily able to peg her as an emotional parasite, though this rarely stops them

from interacting with her­and though their neediness sometimes frustrates
her, she is less judgmental of them than of the doctors and nurses. The
conclusions Vincent draws from her experiences tend toward the obvious (the
better the facilities, the better chance for recovery) and the banal: No one can
heal you except you. Though keenly observed, her account never fully transcends
its central gimmick. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a
division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

394 total views, 1 views today