ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Policeman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs four through seven read:  “In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick became
violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After swearing
at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived, overturned
furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a picture
frame and fought with his wife.”

“The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of
Scotch.”

“But it was when he was told he was being arrested later that
evening that Gulick went ballistic.”

“Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but
overall calm situation quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick
fought back.”

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories Note:  The
Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
and the antidepressant
in the human body.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2010/01/12/12428306-qmi.html

Violent cop acted ‘superhuman’

Constable pleads guilty
to discreditable conduct at hearing
By SCOTT TAYLOR, QMI Agency

OTTAWA – A police
disciplinary hearing heard dramatic testimony yesterday about Const. Jeff
Gulick’s violent conduct in May 2008.

Gulick pleaded guilty yesterday to
discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

He had previously
been found guilty of assaulting a police officer, uttering threats to cause
bodily harm, escaping lawful custody and mischief after officers tried to arrest
him at his home May 22, 2008.

In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick
became violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After
swearing at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived,
overturned furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a
picture frame and fought with his wife.

The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of Scotch.

But it was
when he was told he was being arrested later that evening that Gulick went
ballistic.

Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but overall calm situation
quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick fought back.

“He
started grabbing at my right side and I could feel my holster and gunbelt being
pulled.”

Gulick threatened to kill his fellow cops as he struggled with
what Const. Michael O’Reilly said was “superhuman” strength.

Gulick was
finally overcome after being shocked with a Taser by one of four officers who
had joined the fight.

Gulick was taken to the Ottawa Hospital’s Civic
Campus emergency room, but when they arrived Gulick had shed both wrist and
ankle cuffs and bolted across Carling Ave. to the Experimental Farm, where he
once again was shot with a Taser.

O’Reilly said the situation had “gone
as sideways as it can go.”

Earlier yesterday, a female police officer
testified she feels like an outcast among fellow officers as a result of her
involvement and subsequent testimony in Gulick’s disciplinary hearing.

Sgt. Holly Watson said she’s heard “through the rumour mill” that fellow
officers support Gulick and there “was never any support for the four of us who
were assaulted (by Gulick during the arrest).”

Watson added she has
received no support from the Police Association either. She also testified that
she still worries about where Gulick is when she goes to her car after work.

Police Chief Vern White is scheduled to testify today.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Robbery: Spits on Policeman: England

Paragraph 12 reads:  “It is thought he has since been
suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder,
depression, panic attacks and some psychotic behaviour.”

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Sam Lamsdale, defending, said Hussain had
no recollection of the assault
because the alcohol had reacted with
his medication.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.berrowsjournal.co.uk/news/4698691.Jailed__councillor_s_son_who_stole_TV_and_spat_at_policeman/

Jailed: councillor’s son who stole TV and spat at policeman

8:10am Friday 23rd October 2009

By Lauren Rogers »

THE son of a Worcester councillor has been jailed for spitting at a
police officer and stealing.

Azad Hussain – whose father is former mayor
of Worcester Coun Allah
Ditta
– stole £499 of electrical goods from a woman who was renting a house
from his family.

Hussain, aged 25, claimed she owed him council tax and
said that he was seizing her belongings, including a high-definition television
and computer screen, until she paid up.

However, Worcester
Magistrates Court
was told that the claim was in fact a lie. The stolen
goods have never been recovered.

Hussain, of Richmond Road, off Wyld’s
Lane, Worcester, was found guilty of the theft at a trial he failed to attend
last month. He was also found guilty of assaulting a police officer by spitting
in his face.

The attack happened in May after Hussain was found by
police lying in a front garden.

Matt Dodson, prosecuting, said he was
intoxicated. He said: “His speech was at times incomprehensible and he was
struggling to stand. He refused to leave the area.

“He was arrested
after he lunged at a passing member of the public.”

Hussain spat in the
officer’s face while on the way to the station.

Sam Lamsdale, defending,
said Hussain had no recollection of the assault because the alcohol had reacted
with his medication.

“Mr Hussain was the victim of an attack four years
ago in which he was attacked with a hammer,” she said.

“It is thought he
has since been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, panic
attacks and some psychotic behaviour.”

She said Hussain worked as an
assistant at a residential care home and was responsible for taking his sister’s
children to and from school.

Sentencing Hussain to six months in prison,
district judge Bruce Morgan said: “Community punishments have been imposed in
the past, but obviously do not work because you carry on offending.

“You
steal, you breach court orders by failing to come to court, then there is the
despicable act of spitting at a police officer.”

l Your Worcester
News
was the only member of the media to attend the hearing


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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs 20 through 22 read: “Her fiance told the court they were arguing because he disapproved of her drinking. A Type 1 diabetic, Maitland was also taking medication for anxiety and depression.”

“She said she had not taken her scheduled insulin that night. She told the judge that the medication she’s taken for seven years to treat anxiety and depression affects her memory.”

“‘It makes things a little more fuzzy,’ she said.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.


http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/aug31_09arm.html#Scene_1

Charged for flicking blood

 Ebony Maitland is accused of mischief and assaulting a police bloodElizabeth McMillan
Northern News Services
Published Monday, August 31, 2009

SOMBA K’E/YELLOWKNIFE – A woman accused of assaulting a police officer told a judge Thursday that after responding to an RCMP officer’s request to see her bleeding wrist, he pepper sprayed her, and dragged her to a police cruiser by her hair.

Ebony Maitland is accused of mischief and assaulting a police officer after her blood made contact with an officer during her arrest on July 6, 2008. – Elizabeth McMillan/NNSL photo

Thirty-year-old Ebony Maitland is also on trial by judge in Territorial Court for a charge of mischief.

The assault charge stems from an allegation by police that when she extended her arm, she flicked blood onto RCMP Const. Phil Unger’s face, who was standing about a metre away.

The woman told Chief Judge Brian Bruser she had cut her arm in two places after smashing it through a window during a night of heavy drinking and arguing with her fiance.

During cross examination, Crown prosecutor Diane Keats did not dispute Maitland’s claims about the pepper spray, and being dragged into the police cruiser by her hair, but questioned the accused’s memory about the nature of the interaction between herself and Unger and the manner in which she moved her arm.

Maitland said she recalled being told she was under arrest for causing a disturbance when Unger asked to see her injury. She said she extended her arm with her palm facing upwards.

“He wanted to know how bad it was,” she said. “We didn’t have a conversation. He just asked to see my wrist.”

Unger and another RCMP officer, Const. Jarret MacDonald, responded to a call of a domestic disturbance at Ptarmigan Apartments on July 6, 2008 at around 5 a.m., according to Keats. Maitland was in the parking lot when they arrived, said the prosecutor.

The five-foot-seven, 150-pound woman was barefoot and wearing only shorts and a T-shirt when she was arrested.

Maitland said she was pepper sprayed again while she was sitting in the back of the police cruiser. Keats said it was because Maitland was yelling and smearing blood from her injury on the inside of the vehicle.

The prosecutor said Maitland was behaving aggressively – screaming, swearing and waving her arms in the air when Const. Unger tried to arrest her.

Maitland told the court that Const. Unger threw her against the cruiser before forcing her into the vehicle. “They opened the door and threw me in head first … then they kicked me in the butt,” she told the court.

Keats asked for details about the hours leading up to the parking lot altercation and the soft-spoken woman said she didn’t remember much of the evening.

She told the court she’d been to the Raven pub for several hours that night.

An ambulance attendant testified she told him she had consumed 12 beer.

Keats told the court the two officers had previously responded to a call to the woman’s apartment that evening where Maitland and her fiance were fighting loudly.

Maitland testified she had no memory of their initial visit.

After police left, Maitland and her fiance continued arguing. Maitland said she cut her arm in two places when she hit a window twice. Both Maitland and her fiance said her arm was bleeding profusely when she left the apartment.

Her fiance told the court they were arguing because he disapproved of her drinking. A Type 1 diabetic, Maitland was also taking medication for anxiety and depression.

She said she had not taken her scheduled insulin that night. She told the judge that the medication she’s taken for seven years to treat anxiety and depression affects her memory.

“It makes things a little more fuzzy,” she said.

The fiance said Maitland was extremely intoxicated and he’d been unable to control her. He became flushed and cried as he told the court about watching Maitland interact with the police after she’d been pepper sprayed the first time.

“I couldn’t believe what I was witnessing,” he told the court. “He lifted his boot and kicked her in the butt and started laughing to the other officer.”

An ambulance arrived after Maitland was restrained in the police cruiser. The fiance said he told the driver of the ambulance about Maitland’s medical condition.

Another ambulance attendant, Craig MacLean, testified Maitland resisted treatment, and was swearing and spitting as he tried to assist her.

When questioned by defence lawyer Jay Bran, MacLean said her combative attitude may have been caused by her diabetic state.

When asked about her behaviour in the police cruiser, the ambulance and the hospital, Maitland said she was confused and couldn’t see because the pepper spray had gotten in her eyes.

“I’m not really sure what I was doing because I couldn’t see … I was yelling and screaming because I was in pain,” she said. “My head hurt, my neck hurt, my throat, eyes (and) nose were burning,”

She said she regained her vision after a doctor treated her at the hospital. The injury to her wrist required eight stitches.

After being treated at the hospital, Maitland spent more than eight hours in the drunk tank.

She testified she later received medical attention for an injured toe, which she said was broken by one of the police officers during her arrest.

Maitland said she couldn’t work for two weeks because her job as a cleaner at the hospital required her to be on her feet for long periods of time.

The trial had originally begun April 2, but was adjourned until Aug. 26 and continued until last Friday. The trial resumes Sept. 11.

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