DEPRESSION MED: Man Accused of Plotting to Kill Deputies: Washington

Paragraph eight reads: “A woman who helped raise McConnachie told KIRO 7
that he has a drug problem and is on medication for depression.”

http://www.kirotv.com/news/23142654/detail.html

Officials: Man Accused Of Plotting To Kill Deputies Had Officer’s Stolen
Gun
Posted: 5:31 pm PDT April 13, 2010Updated: 2:45 pm PDT April 14, 2010

EVERETT, Wash. — A 19-year-old man accused of planning to kill sheriff’s
deputies had a gun stolen from the home of a police officer, said Rebecca
Hover of the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

Michael McConnachie made his first court appearance Tuesday and his bail
is set at $350,000. He is being held for investigation of conspiracy and
drug charges.

McConnachie was arrested at an Everett motel on Sunday after police
received a tip. Everett police said a burglary suspect who went to McConnachie’s
motel room said McConnachie claimed to be looking for a driver who would
help him kill deputies.

Inside his room, police said they found a shotgun, a handgun, bullet proof
vests and heroin. One of the guns found was reported stolen in January
from the home of a police officer who lives and works in Snohomish County,
Hover said.

The officer is not a deputy, but Hover did not say what agency he works
for.

Investigators said McConnachie was planning an attack similar to the
Thanksgiving weekend assassination of four Lakewood police officers.

Hover said it appeared to be more than idle talk.

A woman who helped raise McConnachie told KIRO 7 that he has a drug
problem and is on medication for depression.

“He does have an anger management problem, but I have never ever heard him
talk the way he’s being accused of talking to the officers,” said Betty
Firl.

Police said McConnachie told them he didn’t intend to hurt anyone.

Copyright 2010 by KIROTV.com. The Associated Press contributed to this
report. All rights reserved. This material may not

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DEPRESSION MED: Murder-Suicide: Man Shoots three Deputies: Kills One

Paragraph five reads:  “Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer
said Friday that Liles
had been taking medication
for depression and probably took his own life with a gunshot to the
head.”

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-minkler27-2010feb27,0,2450243,full.story

A slow burn suddenly turns deadly in Minkler, Calif.

First there was a series of fires in the small town east of Fresno. Then
came the shootings. On Thursday, a shootout left a sheriff’s deputy dead and two
other law enforcement officers injured.

(Paul Sakuma /
Associated Press / February 26, 2010)

By Diana Marcum

February
27, 2010

Reporting from Minkler ­ Trouble had been brewing in tiny
Minkler, a Sierra foothills community about 20 miles east of Fresno, for months.
But residents never envisioned that it would end with two people — one a
sheriff’s deputy — dead and two other law enforcement officers
wounded.

Joel Wahlenmaier, 49, a veteran with the Fresno County Sheriff’s
Department who investigated homicides and other violent crimes, was killed in
Thursday’s gunfire. Deputy Mark Harris, 48, was injured.

Javier Bejar, a
Reedley police officer who responded to the call for backup in the minutes after
Wahlenmaier was shot, is on life support at Community Regional Medical Center in
Fresno and is not expected to survive.

The suspect, Ricky Ray Liles, 51,
died during the gun battle that erupted when authorities attempted to serve him
with a search warrant.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said Friday that
Liles had been taking medication for depression and probably took his own life
with a gunshot to the head.

Liles had told his wife “that he would not go
to prison,” Dyer said at a news conference. “He would take the lives of several
officers before taking his own life.”

On Friday, what there is of Minkler
was cordoned off as a crime scene, helicopters buzzing overhead.

But
Minkler’s worries began about five months ago with small fires. A bunch of
leaves here, a patch of grass there.

“You’d come out and say, ‘How did
that tractor seat catch on fire?’ ” said rancher Jeff Rodenbeck,
51.

Eventually, a shed and a trailer burned. Then the shootings started.
Someone shot up the Minkler Cash Store six times since January. On Monday,
someone fired four bullets into Sally Minkler’s mobile home.

“Sally said
she bent over to get her cellphone and the bullet went right where her torso had
been,” said Mary Novack, who runs the Minkler Cash Store, the nerve-center and
commercial entirety of Minkler, a town so small it once was listed for sale on
EBay.

Residents were convinced the culprit was Liles, a former security
guard renting a mobile home on Minkler family property across from the
store.

“He was just your average pasty white guy with a bad back,” said
Jeff Butts, who grows grapes and plums along the Kings River.

“But when
you know all your neighbors, you look around and say, ‘Well, I know it’s not
Mary, and it’s not Charlie and it’s not Sally’ . . . and pretty soon everyone
came up with Liles,” Butts said. “He wasn’t friends with anyone. But no one ever
actually saw anything they could prove. Things were getting tense out
here.”

On Thursday morning, Novack was relieved when she saw law
enforcement vehicles pull up to Liles’ place. She called Butts and told him cops
were about to knock on Liles’ door.

“Hey, this guy is finally going down,
let’s go to the store and watch,” Butts said he told one of his
workers.

A small crowd gathered on the front porch of the general store,
which has held court in Minkler since 1920. They watched as a deputy kicked in
the door, shots were fired, an officer slumped, more law enforcement came and a
prolonged gun battle raged.

“I was stunned. I didn’t even get down,”
Butts said. “I kept thinking, ‘What are they doing? Those can’t be real
bullets.’ The cops are saying hundreds of rounds were fired, but it had to be
thousands.”

He was incredulous when a woman, later identified as Liles’
wife, Diane, and a dog emerged from the trailer. “I don’t see how anyone came
out of that alive,” Butts said.

Half a mile down the road, Rodenbeck
heard the first volley of shots. He loaded a pistol and rifle, and got his wife
and teenage daughter away from the house in case gunmen emerged from the woods
behind their home. Then he went to see what was going on.

When the bigger
gun battle began, he crouched inside his truck’s tire well.

“Look, this
is the country, gunfire is not a big deal, you hear it all the time. Someone’s
shooting at coyotes. Or skeet,” he said. “But this was a war zone. It sounded
like the cops had automatic rifles and they kept shooting. If you’d been here,
you would have hit the ground. It rocked this place. He killed a cop right in
front of them, and they don’t take lightly to that and I can’t say I blame
them.”

Rodenbeck moved to Minkler from Huntington Beach to raise his
family away from the city. He likes the beauty — “this is river bottom, green
all the time” — the quiet, and the fact that men such as Charles Minkler, the
great-grandson of Orzo Minkler, who founded the town in 1892, can still load
1,000 bales of hay. Minkler is in his 70s.

“Out here, men don’t get old.
They get beat up and wrinkled, but they don’t use canes,” Rodenbeck said. “They
have chores to do.”

But he was never under any illusion that violence
couldn’t touch this place.

“They say they used to hang people from that
tree over there,” he said. “Charlie can tell you about the bandits that used to
hide out in these hills. Different people have different reasons for wanting to
be out somewhere quiet.”

Novack, 54, recalls drug-dealing motorcycle
gangs in the 1970s. As a teenager, she glimpsed white-robed Ku Klux Klan members
burning crosses at the river’s edge.

“That’s a sight you never forget,”
Novack said. “It’s chilling.”

She looked around at the orchards in bloom,
snow-dusted peaks and sheepdogs trying to make friends with the
police.

“People are saying, ‘In Minkler? It’s so beautiful and quiet
there.’ But good and evil are everywhere,” she said. “Right in front of you.
Right next to each other all the time.”

metrodesk@latimes.com

Marcum is a
special correspondent for The Times.

The Associated Press contributed to
this report.

Copyright © 2010, The Los Angeles
Times

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Violence: Stand-Off: Oregon

Paragraph 3 reads:  “According to a Clackamas County
Sheriff’s report, Hatcher took a large amount of antidepressant
medication
coupled with alcohol
just before 9 p.m. on Nov. 18 and
turned violent. Family members fled the home, called the police and said Hatcher
wanted responding officers to shoot him. Emergency responders began arriving
shortly after the call and attempted to initiate communication with
Hatcher.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.estacadanews.com/news/story.php?story_id=125878060687193400

Standoff with armed gunman ends peacefully

SWAT team called in to negotiate with Estacada man

By Evan Jensen

The
Estacada News, Nov 20, 2009

Bret Hatcher.

Submitted
photo / Estacada News

Twenty-five miles east of downtown Estacada,
near the Ripple Brook Ranger Station on Highway 224, a mentally disturbed
Estacada man went on a rampage Nov. 18, breaking windows, chasing family members
from the home and firing shots from a .22-caliber rifle.

But after a
two-hour standoff with Clackamas County Sheriff’s deputies and SWAT negotiators,
Brent A. Hatcher, 28, was taken into custody and booked in the Clackamas County
Jail for unlawful use of a weapon and reckless endangerment, with bail set at
$200,000. Charges of attempted murder were dropped, but Hatcher remains in jail
under close supervision.

According to a Clackamas County Sheriff’s
report, Hatcher took a large amount of antidepressant medication coupled with
alcohol just before 9 p.m. on Nov. 18 and turned violent. Family members fled
the home, called the police and said Hatcher wanted responding officers to shoot
him. Emergency responders began arriving shortly after the call and attempted to
initiate communication with Hatcher.

“At 10:14 p.m., Bret Hatcher
answered the telephone at the resident and declared repeatedly that he had a
rifle and would shoot to kill,” CCSO Public Information Officer Jim Strovink
said.

At 10:22 p.m., deputies at the rear entrance of the residence
saw Hatcher exit the residence with rifle in hand. While the Special Weapon and
Tactics Team was being mobilized, deputies continued to try and make contact
with Hatcher, then heard two gunshots fired in their direction.

“The
stationed deputies on the perimeter could hear the rounds whipping through the
tree line in close proximity to where they were positioned,” CCSO Capt. Kevin
Layng said.

At 11:16 p.m., SWAT negotiators made contact with Hatcher by
phone and continued to attempt to calm him and develop an exit plan to take
Hatcher into custody without anyone getting hurt.

“Clackamas County’s
SWAT negotiators receive extensive training in the art of communicating with
people in challenging situations, especially those with mental-health issues,”
Strovink said. “… An estimated 35 percent of all inmates at the Clackamas County
Jail suffer from some form of mental-health issue.”

SWAT negotiators were
able to take Hatcher into custody without incident and transport him to the
Clackamas County Jail. Upon collecting evidence from the scene, investigators
found that the .22-caliber weapon Hatcher fired had malfunctioned and one round
was found jammed in the chamber, making the weapon inoperable.

“This
incident involves a man mixing his medication with alcohol, destroying his home,
chasing his family from the resident, and then arming himself with a rifle…”
Strovink said. “… but it did have a successful conclusion. He was safely brought
into police custody, with no injuries to anyone. … The SWAT negotiators did a
commendable job, calmly managing a difficult and threatening subject on the
phone and securing a peaceful
surrender.”

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ZOLOFT: Charges of DUI & Child Endangerment: Florida

Paragraph seven reads:  “Smith told deputies she had not
been drinking, but was on several medicines including Zoloft.
According to the report, Smith would not blow the required amount of air
into the Breathalyzer. The small amount that registered recorded a 0.13 blood
alcohol content.”


http://www.ocala.com/article/20091026/ARTICLES/910269989/1340/NEWS?Title=Mother-arrested-in-McDonald-s-parking-lot-charged-with-child-neglect-DUI

Mother arrested in McDonald’s parking lot, charged with child neglect,
DUI

Staff report

Published: Monday, October 26, 2009
at 11:41 a.m.
Last Modified: Monday, October 26, 2009 at 11:44 a.m.

OCALA – An Ocala woman was arrested on Sunday and charged with drunken
driving and child neglect after she reportedly drove to McDonald’s while she was
drunk and transporting a 5-year-old boy.

According to a Marion County
Sheriff’s Office report, Nekisha Smith, 29, drove to the McDonald’s at 9737 SE
Maricamp Road in a blue Kia.

An employee became concerned after the woman
ordered with slurred speech and smelled of alcohol, according to the report.
Smith then asked for things she didn’t order, such as a “double chicken burger
thing.”

The employee told Smith to pull forward while her food cooked and
called deputies, according to the report.

When Deputy Gary Miller
arrived, Smith was parked in the car eating. Smith told deputies she was just
tired and had been drinking the day before.

According to the report,
Smith failed all field sobriety tests and was arrested. The child‘s father
picked up the boy and the car.

Smith told deputies she had not been
drinking, but was on several medicines including Zoloft. According to the
report, Smith would not blow the required amount of air into the Breathalyzer.
The small amount that registered recorded a 0.13 blood alcohol
content.

Deputies then contacted the Department of Children and
Families.

Smith was being held in the Marion County Jail in lieu of

$5,500 bail. Smith was arrested in 2006 for DUI with property
damage.

-Jackie Alexander/Star Banner

All rights reserved. This
copyrighted material may not be re-published without permission. Links are
encouraged.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Commits Suicide: Husband Charged for Assisting: Florida

Paragraph asix reads:  “Deputies say Ragan and his wife
were having marital problems and his wife was on
anti-depressants.
She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.”

http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpp/news/brevard_news/091409_assisted_suicide_charge

Brevard man charged with assisted suicide

Updated:
Tuesday, 15 Sep 2009, 12:23 AM EDT
Published : Monday, 14 Sep 2009, 5:15 PM
EDT

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) – A Brevard County man has been

charged with assisted suicide after police say he helped his wife kill herself.
Investigators say this is one of the more bizarre cases they’ve ever
seen.

A 4-year-old child was left without his mom after she took her own
life and now he could lose his father too. Kevin Ragan was arrested for helping
his wife commit suicide.

In the frantic 911 call he told a dispatcher his
30-year-old wife was depressed and had been drinking. He says she threatened to
kill herself and admits offering her some loaded guns.

Ragan on 911 Call:
“I was being a smart a** and threw like three guns on the bed. I’m like, then do
it. And, she just picked the 40 caliber hand gun up.”

The rest of the 911
call on that sad day is too graphic to air, a distraught Ragan crying and asking
for an ambulance.

Deputies say Ragan and his wife were having marital
problems and his wife was on anti-depressants. She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.

Now more than three months later, after deputies got
confirmation from the medical examiner that the death was in fact a suicide,
they charged Ragan with assisting a suicide. He was arrested and bonded
out.

No one was home on Monday when a FOX 35 crew went to the Ragan home
but neighbors say they are stunned.

FOX 35 checked and found that Ragan
has no criminal history in Brevard
County.

431 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Commits Suicide: Husband Charged: Florida

Paragraph asix reads:  “Deputies say Ragan and his wife
were having marital problems and his wife was on
anti-depressants.
She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.”

http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpp/news/brevard_news/091409_assisted_suicide_charge

Brevard man charged with assisted suicide

Updated:
Tuesday, 15 Sep 2009, 12:23 AM EDT
Published : Monday, 14 Sep 2009, 5:15 PM
EDT

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) – A Brevard County man has been

charged with assisted suicide after police say he helped his wife kill herself.
Investigators say this is one of the more bizarre cases they’ve ever
seen.

A 4-year-old child was left without his mom after she took her own
life and now he could lose his father too. Kevin Ragan was arrested for helping
his wife commit suicide.

In the frantic 911 call he told a dispatcher his
30-year-old wife was depressed and had been drinking. He says she threatened to
kill herself and admits offering her some loaded guns.

Ragan on 911 Call:
“I was being a smart a** and threw like three guns on the bed. I’m like, then do
it. And, she just picked the 40 caliber hand gun up.”

The rest of the 911
call on that sad day is too graphic to air, a distraught ragan crying and asking
for an ambulance.

Deputies say Ragan and his wife were having marital
problems and his wife was on anti-depressants. She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.

Now more than three months later, after deputies got
confirmation from the medical examiner that the death was in fact a suicide,
they charged Ragan with assisting a suicide. He was arrested and bonded
out.

No one was home on Monday when a FOX 35 crew went to the Ragan home
but neighbors say they are stunned.

FOX 35 checked and found that Ragan
has no criminal history in Brevard
County. 
 

682 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 17 Year Old Attempts Suicide: Charged with Illegal Pos…

First sentence of paragraph 13 reads:  “About a month before the suicide attempt, the teenager was diagnosed with “major depressive disorder” and was taking prescription anti-depressants, court papers say.”

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20090806/NEWS01/908060333/1002/NEWS/Mendon+teen+charged+after+suicide+attempt

Mendon teen charged after suicide attempt

Gary Craig • Staff writer • August 6, 2009

A Mendon teenager’s attempt to commit suicide has led to his prosecution on a weapons charge.

On April 29 the teen carried his father’s .40-caliber firearm into a shed on his family property with the intent of killing himself, court papers allege.

Alerted by a suicide note, his parents called 911. Responding deputies found the 17yearold on his back in the shed with the gun “pointed at his chin,” according to a Sheriff’s Office report. The teenager relinquished the gun, the report states.

With the apparent suicide attempt averted, deputies then charged the teenager with misdemeanor criminal possession of a weapon because, they say, he was not the legal owner of the gun. And now, the District Attorney’s Office is prosecuting the teen for the illegal weapon charge, after what the teen’s lawyer says have been multiple unsuccessful attempts to reach a resolution other than a criminal charge.

“In as inappropriate, unfortunate and misplaced a use of prosecutorial discretion as the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office ever has demonstrated, my client now effectively is being prosecuted for attempting suicide,” attorney Jeffrey Wicks wrote in a motion filed this week.

District Attorney Michael Green said prosecution in such a case can be used to ensure the individual gets treatment. For instance, a sentence of probation could include continued court-ordered treatment, Green said.

“This kind of conduct can pose a threat to himself and other people,” Green said. “I’m certainly sympathetic to him and his family.”

Wicks this week filed a motion asking that the charges against the teenager be dismissed “in the interest of justice,” a part of the penal law that gives judges the discretion to dismiss charges if, for instance, the alleged crime was of questionable seriousness. Also key to requests to dismiss a charge in the interest of justice is the character of the accused and the likelihood the community would be at risk if the accused went free.

The teenager “has no previous arrests or history of violence,” Wicks states in court papers. The Democrat and Chronicle is not identifying the accused because, if found guilty, he would be adjudicated as a youthful offender under the law.
(2 of 2)

Wicks said the teenager and his family would not answer questions from the media because of the pending criminal charge.

In his suicide note, the teenager apologized to his parents “for everything,” saying: “I’ve disappointed you guys countless times.”

“You don’t deserve that,” he wrote in the note, which is included in court papers.

About a month before the suicide attempt, the teenager was diagnosed with “major depressive disorder” and was taking prescription anti-depressants, court papers say. After the attempt, he spent 19 days at an adolescent psychiatric unit. He is now on a different regimen of medication and “not only is doing well but is feeling strong, confident and future-oriented,” Wicks writes in court papers.

A conviction and the possibility of incarceration “would be catastrophic” for his continued improvement, Wicks contends.

Green said incarceration is “not the only option available here” and again emphasized that prosecution might ensure continued valuable treatment.

GCRAIG@DemocratandChronicle.com

693 total views, 6 views today