A Mindless Zombie on Paxil

“I was all jittery and I just felt weird.”

My name is Rachel. I had a bad experience with Paxil. I went to my
family doctor and told him about my depression. After talking to me for about 10 minutes, he decided that I needed Paxil for my depression. I was reluctant, but I took it. I took my first pill the next morning. At first I
felt nauseated. Later during the day, I was extremely happy and really hyper. I walked for miles and didnt get tired. The next morning I woke up craving the pill. But I didn’t take it. I was afraid. I was all jittery and I just felt weird. I don’t think this is a very effective drug unless you want to be a continously happy mindless zombie.

Rachel

10/12/2000

This is Survivor Story number 9.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

757 total views, no views today

Sleepwalking on Profen II

“…no one in my family will ever take Profen II again!”

 

About a year ago we noticed that strange things were going on during the night. We figured that one of our children was walking in their sleep because they occasionally did that. One night all the pillows from my bedroom disappeared during the night. The next morning we found them stacked neatly in one of the living room chairs. Included was my pillow as well as about 8 others (I don’t know how I slept without it or didn’t notice it was missing).

It kind of gave me the creeps knowing that someone was in my room and several trips to the living room and neither my husband nor I heard or felt anything.

We kept finding things in odd places. TP in the fridge, etc. Then one night I

awoke sitting at the kitchen table. I was in the process of pouring a bowl of milk down the front of my nightgown. I had eaten cheerios and was trying to drink the milk out of the bowl. I never did this type of thing. I hardly ever ate cereal. I hardly ever drank milk. And I NEVER drank the milk out of the bowl! I went back to bed.

But I wasn’t through. Later that night I woke up standing next to the refrigerator and drinking a glass of —– can you guess —— yep, Dr. Bronner’s liquid peppermint soap!!! It was horrible, of course, and I have no idea why I picked that and how it got on the kitchen counter!!!!! I spent the next few hours trying to get the taste out of my mouth, calling poison control (I don’t know how much I drank before the taste woke me up), and being sick in the bathroom.

The case of the sleep walker was solved. But why? I never had been a sleep walker (that I know of) and why was I doing strange things. Poison control said that I should call my Doctor in the morning since the episodes seemed to be getting more bizarre and dangerous. Who knows, I might have gone outside and who knows what. Well, the case was solved when I read about all the medications I was on ——– the Doctor had recently put me on Profen II for a sinus infection and didn’t tell me not to take it after 5p.m.. I was taking it around 9 p.m. with the rest of my meds. I supposedly had a rare reaction to it. Needless to say I stopped taking it. And the strange things stopped too. No more pillows moved and strange things put in odd places and no more eating or drinking strange things.

Now for the rest of the story —- Two weeks ago my 9 year old daughter had a sinus infection and the Doctor put her on Profen II —- she is adopted and not biologically related to me and the Doctor said she should be fine on it. Again, they didn’t tell me not to give it after 5 p.m. —- I gave it to her at 7 p.m. and she went to bed. Around 9 p.m. we heard a loud noise and she came tumbling down the stairs, stood up wide eyed, looking wild. I gently asked her what she was doing and she said she was looking for her pillow (which had fallen off her bed). She was unhurt and so I sent her back to bed.

She didn’t remember any of this the next morning. I called the pharmacy & they gave me the phone number for the rep who sells Profen. She called me back the next day & I told her what happened to me & my daughter. She called back again later and told me that we should never take it after 5 p.m. and evidently after we went to sleep part of our brain stayed on hyperdrive and made us do weird things. Obviously, no one in my family will ever take Profen II again! Most people on Profen just get hyper and can’t sleep.

That is why I can’t stand the smell of peppermint soap anymore! Now you know more than you ever wanted to know about Dr. Bronner’s and Profen II.

Jean — in Georgia

9/14/2000

This is Survivor Story number 12.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

656 total views, no views today

5-Year Old’s Unusual Reaction to 5-htp

“I read about 5-htp and under the recommendation of a friend.”

I have read about your research and articles about the harmful effects of Prozac, etc., and wonder if you can help me figure out why my 5-yr old son had an unusual reaction to 5-htp –a supposedly safe natural supplement.

My son Alex has is mildly autistic and has sleep problems in that he takes a long time to fall asleep (1-2 hours) and ends up going to sleep around midnight every night. I read about 5-htp and under the recommendation of a friend decided to try it to see if it would help Alex to sleep and to calm down. (At that time, he seemed to have gotten a little immune to melatonin which we used to give him once in a while to help him sleep, which was why we were looking for other means.) On the first night we gave him 100mg at 6:30 p.m. and he resisted going to bed till 9:30p.m., then fell asleep at 10p.m. However, he woke up at 3a.m. that night and stayed awake all night and all of the next day, falling asleep at 10p.m.! We didn’t give him anything that night, but to convince ourselves that his reaction was not a coincidence (he does have the tendency to wake up in the middle of the night once in a while), We gave him another 100mg on the third night at around 8:30p.m. This time he fell asleep at 9:30p.m., but woke up at 11p.m., 2 hours later! He only managed to fall asleep at 5a.m. the next morning, then woke up at 8a.m. During the time that he was awake on the medication, he looked quite disoriented and tired, but didn’t have any aggressive or extreme behaviors just real out-of-sorts.

Do you think Alex has a problem metabolizing the serotonin? Have you come across any other incidences like his?

A Note from Dr. Tracy
As those of you who have read the research in my book (Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?) know, elevated levels of serotonin are found in those who are autistic. This indicates an inability to metabolize serotonin. Therefore, ANYTHING that increases serotonin – whether you are told it is natural or not – should be expected to produce adverse effects in someone who has autistic symptoms.

L. L.

6/20/2000

This is Survivor Story number 21.

Total number of stories in current database is 96

710 total views, no views today

My 18-Year Old’s Bizarre Behavior on Prozac

“At no time …did any one mention Prozac’s side effects.”

My 18 year old son has been on Prozac for the last year and a half.
Initially, I brought him to a counselor for some mild anxiety he was experiencing (shyness in social situations, etc.) The counselor (a licensed MSW) prescribed Prozac, saying that it would greatly reduce Jeff’s anxiety. Indeed, after two weeks Jeff reported feeling better, being more relaxed in school and in social situations. Over the next 6 months or so, however, I began to notice some disturbing symptoms (excessive sleepiness at times and at other times extreme agitation along with an inability to concentrate on schoolwork).I told his family doctor, who suggested cutting his dose of Prozac, from 20 mg. to 10 mg. Shortly after this time, Jeff began to develop a severe drinking problem. He frequently came home so intoxicated that he could not stand and remembered nothing the next morning. His grades in school also started plummeting: during his senior year in high school, his grades went from B+ to failing. He was extremely agitated, anxious, unable to sit still or focus. At this point his counselors recommended that his Prozac be upped from 10 to 20 mg.

Things went from bad to worse-his drinking increased, he barely graduated from high school (he was on home study because he was exhibiting bizarre, sometimes threatening behavior in school, and was suspended).At no time during this period did any one mention Prozac’s side effects or the possibility that Jeff was having a serious reaction to this drug.

Finally, towards the end of summer ’99, when he picked up his prescription from the pharmacy, he read the label and noticed some of the possible side effects, pointing out to my husband and myself that these were the same things he’d been experiencing. We made a family decision to stop the Prozac, not realizing that the fun was just beginning. About a week after stopping the Prozac, Jeff began to have panic attacks (something he’d never experienced before).Along with the shaking, irregular heartbeat and anxiety, he experienced strange sensations in his head and a buzzing sound in his ears. We went to see his doctor, who didn’t make the connection-he sent him to a psychologist to treat the panic attacks, not suspecting that the problem might be Prozac withdrawal (nor did I). For the past 2 months, his symptoms have grown steadily worse: he’s been in the emergency room for severe headaches, has seen a neurologist, had many expensive tests, and been diagnosed with Migraine.

No one made the connection between his symptoms and the fact that he had stopped the Prozac abruptly (all doctors knew of his decision). It wasn’t until I saw Dr. Tracy on the Leeza show recently that I started to suspect that this might be the problem. Since then I’ve been researching Prozac on the internet and am amazed at the information I’m finding! I’ve spoken to Jeff’s doctor who was as surprised as I about these complications (I printed and mailed him lots of info.)I will order your book, as I want to know what I can do to help my son at this point apologize at the length of this e-mail, but I had to tell this story to someone.
Thank you.

Followup Letter to Dr. Tracy:
Dear Dr. Tracy,
Thank you for your kind response to my e-mail. It’s obvious that this is an issue very close to your heart. It’ s easy for me to see how frustrating this battle can be: the more information that I find on this topic, the more appalled I become that the medical and psychiatric professions are allowing this to happen to unsuspecting and trusting patients. Amazingly, Jeff seems to be doing much better. Just within the past week, his headaches have all but disappeared, and his anxiety level is greatly diminished. It’s been about 2 1/2 months since he stopped taking the Prozac- from what I’ve read however there can be delayed withdrawal reactions, so I’m not sure we’re out of the woods yet. I’ve been very busy printing information that I find on the internet and sending Jeff’s doctor and counselors letters and packets of information. My hope is that they will at least begin to question these drugs and do some research on their own. I’d like to show you an excerpt from the letter I wrote to the psychologist Jeff was referred to for the panic attacks he experienced shortly after discontinuing the Prozac. I am particularly annoyed with this doctor because he told me that Jeff’ panic attacks were the manifestations of OCD and that he needed to be on medication. From letter to Dr. Robbins: Coincidentally, now that Jeff’s withdrawal symptoms seem to have abated, he is much more like the son I once knew. He’s more relaxed, he’s stopped drinking, his sense of humor is back, and he’s actually able to focus on schoolwork ( he got an A on a recent College Comp. paper.)What does this say about Prozac? Basically, I feel that this drug took my son away from me for two years! I have also written a letter to the Rochester editorial page; a Speaking Outessay. I’ll let you know if they print it. If there’s any way I can help you with this cause, please let me know .I feel very strongly about it: this drug took my 16 year old son, who had been identified as gifted, was well-liked by his peers, and had a great sense of humor, and reduced him to a barely functioning shell of a person. I am thankful to you and God for rescuing us from this terrible shadow that hung over our lives.

Yes, I would like my e-mail (the original and this reply) posted on your website. You may include my first name and e-mail address. I would also like to remind people who’ve had negative experiences with Prozac or another anti-depressant to send a med-watch complaint to the FDA. The number for your local FDA is in the Federal organization section of the phone book. There is also a link from this ICFDA web site.] The more complaints they get the more likely it is they’ll investigate (I hope, unless they’re in this with the drug companies- but that’s a whole different topic)

Patti582@aol.com

2/27/2000

This is Survivor Story number 27.

Total number of stories in current database is 96

647 total views, 1 views today