ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Antidepressant-Induced Violence in America

Paragraphs 23 through 25 read:  “Breggin studied medical
and other records of 50 cases of the newer antidepressants and violence, suicide
or disruptive behavior for his book, he said.”

In one case, a man
on an antidepressant wanted to die so badly that he ran into a police
officer with his car so he could knock him down, get his gun and try to shoot
himself.
Breggin said the police officer
didn’t press for a lengthy jail sentence because he thought the drug had
essentially driven the man crazy.”

“He said there is

no question that antidepressants can lead to
violence.”

Are claims just an excuse?

Poyner said she’s aware that critics will charge that antidepressant
claims merely offer criminals an excuse.

“I know that and I would have
said the same thing until I read this research,” Poyner said. “I worked
in prisons. I’ve treated inmates and so I tend to be very skeptical of somebody
trying to blame something on something else, especially a medication that is
prescribed by a doctor. But now I’m taking a second look at that thought and
saying, ‘Wait a minute.’”

http://newsok.com/oklahom-experts-look-at-antidepressants/article/3419386

Oklahoma experts look at antidepressants
Recent violence in Fort Hood,
Nichols Hills has some looking at links with medication

BY SONYA COLBERG
Published: November 22, 2009

As soon as news hit that the alleged Fort
Hood
, Texas,
shooter was a military psychiatrist, a disturbing thought struck Oklahoma
psychologist Gail Poyner.

  • Questions
    remain
    about risk to public
  • 11/22/2009 The debate over whether antidepressants play a role in suicides
    and homicides has taken twists and turns over the years. Drug company
    GlaxoSmithKline sent a…
“I wondered if….

“I think it would be interesting to know if
he had been taking an SSRI (antidepressant). It seems, based on news reports,
that he was very depressed. He may have taken an SSRI and that may have played a
part. Hopefully that will be investigated to determine,” said Poyner, a Ph.D.
with a practice in Choctaw.

Poyner was out of state and was shocked to
hear of the local allegations against Dr.
Stephen Paul Wolf
, jailed on murder and assault complaints in connection
with the recent stabbing death of his 9-year-old son, Tommy. The Nichols
Hills
doctor told the medical licensure board that he took antidepressants,
records show.

Wolf told the board he was hospitalized for depression and
under psychotherapy until his 1988 graduation from medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
.

He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized
again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,” Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. “I returned to work after my hospitalization on adjusted
dosages of antidepressants.”

It is unclear whether antidepressant usage
might have played any role in the Nov. 16 stabbing.

“Crimes that involve
this horrendous departure from one’s character and typical behavior may warrant
an investigation,” Poyner said. “Investigators may want to look into a possible
connection between his behavior and a recent introduction or increase in an

antidepressant.”

She added that every crime committed by someone taking
an antidepressant isn’t necessarily related to the antidepressant. A small
percentage of people have a genetic abnormality that can cause a violent
reaction to certain antidepressants, she said.

“We’re finding there are
cases of criminal behavior, especially violent and out-of-character criminal
behavior, that may be linked to these antidepressants,” Poyner said.

If
there’s blood on someone’s hands, investigate whether antidepressants were in

their systems, some experts say. The drugs are considered particularly dangerous
when certain patients are just beginning antidepressants, increasing the dosage
or getting off antidepressants, Poyner said.

But other experts say
there’s no clear evidence that antidepressants and violence go hand-in-hand.

Fort Hood raises questions
Dr.
Peter Breggin
, a medical doctor, former Johns
Hopkins University
faculty associate and author of “Medication Madness: The
Role of Psychiatric Drugs in Violence, Suicide and Murder,” said he immediately
wondered if Maj.
Nidal Hasan
was self-medicating.

“I think it was very likely,”
Breggin said.

Hasan was charged recently with 13 premeditated murder
counts stemming from the shootings. Investigators have made allegations about
Hasan exchanging e-mail with a radical imam, connecting with al-Qaida

members, lionizing suicide bombings and yelling “Allahu Akbar!” as the shootings
began. But Breggin said something more subtle might have been missed.

“It’s very possible that if he was … self-medicating, it could have
been Xanax.
I would say not that the drug did it but it might have pushed him over. But we
don’t know,” Breggin said.

He said that, as a psychiatrist, Hasan could
have easily taken antidepressant samples, and he could write his own
prescriptions for antidepressants. The FBI
removed possible evidence from Hasan’s apartment and then allowed media into the
dingy rooms. Among the things reported left behind were bottles of medications,
including some that he prescribed to himself.

Some call studies
inconclusive
For some people, Breggin said, newer antidepressants are “a
virtual prescription for violence.”

Dr.
Jayson Hymes
, though, said the studies are somewhat inconclusive. Some
research suggests the newer family of antidepressants, SSRIs (selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitors), might have a role in causing violence. But
British studies show they decrease the likelihood, he noted.

“Walking
past a bottle of antidepressants is not going to do anything,” Hymes said. “It
sounds to me, in this situation, that a lot of things just got missed by a lot
of people.”

He said the drugs under question are those antidepressants

that have become popular in the past 10 or 15 years: drugs such as Zoloft
and Celexa.
Probably the most violent behavior is a desire in some people to commit suicide,
he said.

A personal theory Hymes has developed indicates that along with
the suicidal thoughts come fatigue and the inability to make a decision and act
on it. The SSRIs work fast so the person’s energy level increases more quickly
than the mood elevation, he said. So the patient, particularly children and
young people, may still feel depressed and suicidal but suddenly has the energy
to act out.

Researcher claims violence tie
Breggin studied medical
and other records of 50 cases of the newer antidepressants and violence, suicide
or disruptive behavior for his book, he said.

In one case, a man on an

antidepressant wanted to die so badly that he ran into a police officer with his
car so he could knock him down, get his gun and try to shoot himself. Breggin
said the police officer didn’t press for a lengthy jail sentence because he
thought the drug had essentially driven the man crazy.

He said there is
no question that antidepressants can lead to violence.

But Hymes said
controversy over antidepressants can lead to frightening people away from drugs
that they may need.

“People can … moan about antidepressants all day
until they look at a loved one lying on the couch, only able to get up and go to
the bathroom and that’s it. In which case, it’s like, ‘Where’s that

antidepressant?’” Hymes said.

Oklahoma’s Poyner recently testified as an
expert witness in a murder case in which the defendant had been on
antidepressants. In the weeks leading up to the trial she examined studies and
stories on the correlation of antidepressants and violence. That research opened
her eyes to the possibilities of some famous cases such as housewife Andrea
Yates
’ drowning of her five children in 2001. But she remains shocked about
the horrible nature of such crimes, she said.

Are claims just an
excuse?

Poyner said she’s aware that critics will charge that antidepressant
claims merely offer criminals an excuse.

“I know that and I would have
said the same thing until I read this research,” Poyner said. “I worked in
prisons. I’ve treated inmates and so I tend to be very skeptical of somebody
trying to blame something on something else, especially a medication that is
prescribed by a doctor. But now I’m taking a second look at that thought and
saying, ‘Wait a minute.’”

Read more: http://newsok.com/oklahom-experts-look-at-antidepressants/article/3419386#ixzz0Xb21LiSq

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Doctor Murders his 9 Year Old Son: Oklahoma

Last thee paragraphs read:  “He wrote he continued
psychotherapy until his graduation from medical school in June 1988.”

“He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized again for three days
in 1995 for acute depression.”

” ‘I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,’  Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. ‘I returned to work after my hospitalization on
adjusted dosages of
antidepressants
‘.”

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Wolf was seeing
a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication,

The Oklahoman has learned. His mental issues
date back to his first year of medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized
for major depression, his medical records show.”

http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten

Affidavit, calls detail brutal death of Nichols Hills boy, 9
Doctor,
arrested in son’s stabbing, battled mental problems, records show

BY NOLAN CLAY
Published: November 18,
2009

NICHOLS
HILLS
­ A doctor who has battled mental issues for years said his son

was the devil as he stabbed the boy to death Monday morning at their home,
according to a police affidavit and a 911 recording.
[]
Stephen
Paul Wolf The 51-yearold is being held in the Oklahoma County jail on a murder
complaint.

What the affidavit states …
Here is a description
from a police affidavit of events Monday morning when police officer Michael
Puckett arrived at Dr. Stephen P. Wolf’s Nichols Hills home:

The officer
was dispatched at 3:52 a.m. Monday to the house of a neighbor who called police
after Mary Wolf banged on the neighbor’s front door. The officer heard screaming
from Wolf’s house and met Mary Wolf at the open front door. She told the
officer, “He’s killing my son. He’s killing my son.”

The officer drew

his gun and went through the house, finding the doctor on his knees “wrestling
with something up against a cabinet door and a dishwasher.”

The officer
ordered Wolf to put his hands up. “At that time Mr. Wolf raised his hands to
about head level and looked back at Officer Puckett and said, ‘He’s got the
devil in him and you know it’ several times.”

The officer ordered Wolf,
who was covered in blood, to get on his stomach. Wolf complied. The officer then
saw the victim, Tommy, with a knife in his head and a knife in his chest.

“Mr. Wolf again started saying, ‘You know he’s got the devil in him’
several times over.”

The boy then began to convulse and “Mr. Wolf leapt
up off the floor and said, ‘He’s not dead’ and tried (to) grab a knife from the
body to continue the assault.” The police officer pulled Wolf by the neck and
shirt and Wolf fell and dropped a knife.

The officer kicked Wolf in the
head as Wolf tried to reach for the knife and punched him in the jaw when Wolf
tried to reach for the knife again. The officer then was able to toss the knife
away.

Another officer arrived and handcuffed the doctor.

Slain boy remembered
Tommy Wolf, 9, was remembered Tuesday as
a sweet boy.

“He was always creative and feisty,” said Kristin Moyer,
26, of Oklahoma City, who was a counselor at an after-school program at Casady
School when Tommy was a student in 2006.

“He was a little feisty kid,
but he wasn’t bad. Just a typical boy. He loved having fun with the rest of his

friends,” she said.

“He was a real sweet kid. He did have his share of
timeouts, just like the rest of them. But I really enjoyed him.”

Others
who knew the boy made similar comments online at NewsOK.com.

“I knew
Tommy through Cub Scouts,” wrote Cheldrea Mollett of Oklahoma City. “He was a
lovely, sweet and wonderful boy. God has him now, and he is at peace.”

NewsOK Related Articles

Stephen
Paul Wolf
, 51, is in the Oklahoma
County
jail on a murder complaint. His son, Tommy, was 9.

Wolf was
seeing a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication, The
Oklahoman
has learned. His mental issues date back to his first year of
medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized for major depression, his

medical records show.

He repeatedly told the police officer who broke up
the attack on his son, “He’s got the devil in him and you know it,” according to
the police arrest affidavit.

His wife, Mary
Wolf
, was making a 911 call during the attack. Police officer Michael
Puckett
can be heard on the recording telling the doctor, “Put your hands
behind your ——- back now!”

The doctor can be heard saying, “Mary,
he’s the devil.” Mary Wolf replies, “He’s not the devil.” She then says,
“Tommy.”

The doctor tried to stab his son again when the boy began
convulsing, even though the officer had his gun drawn, police reported. The
officer pulled the doctor away and then had to kick and strike the doctor in the
head to keep the doctor from getting a knife again.

The doctor attacked

his son in the kitchen of their $500,000 house at 1715 Elmhurst Ave., police
reported.

Wolf ­ covered in blood ­ was on top of his son when
the officer arrived shortly before 4 a.m. Monday, police reported. The victim
had “a knife lodged in the left upper section of his head and a knife stuck in
the upper right part of the chest,” police reported. The boy died at the home.
Mary Wolf was treated for cuts on her hands and face.

A neighbor, Douglas
Woodson
, told police the doctor “was under review at his hospital for anger
issues,” police reported in the affidavit. The neighbor also told police the

doctor “was supposed to go to a rehab facility for the anger plus drug and
alcohol abuse.”

Tommy was in the third grade at Christ the King
Catholic School
. His funeral is tentatively planned for Friday.

History of depression
The doctor specialized in internal medicine. St.
Anthony Hospital
said arrangements have been made with other doctors to
provide medical care to his patients.

The doctor’s attorney, Mack
Martin
, declined comment.

The doctor in 1991 told the medical
licensure board that he began psychotherapy when he was hospitalized for
depression during his first year of medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
. He said he took a year off from medical school.

“Through continuing psychotherapy unresolved conflicts from my early
childhood and adolescence were discovered,” he wrote in 1991. “I grieved for my
father for the first time. He died in an airplane crash three weeks before my
third birthday in 1961. I experienced the pain and loss of failed relationships
in high school. I felt anger toward my mother and stepfather because of problems
in our relationship.”

He wrote he continued psychotherapy until his
graduation from medical school in June 1988.

He told the board in 1996
that he was hospitalized again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a result of all of the stress in my busy practice of
internal medicine and all the demands in making the final arrangements for my
marriage,” Wolf wrote in a letter to the board. “I returned to work after my
hospitalization on adjusted dosages of antidepressants.”

Read more:
http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten#ixzz0XEj9aNVs

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