ANTIDEPRESSANTS & THEIR CONNECTION TO FALSE MEMORIES OF SEXUAL ABUSE

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): Mackenzie Phillips has accused her deceased famous father Papa John of the Mamas and the Papas of sexually abusing her when they were high on drugs. Now if they were both high on drugs it could be possible, but I don’t buy it because it is SO EXTREMELY COMMON for those on antidepressants to make false accusations of sexual abuse!

Her step mother said she does not believe these accusations of abuse. She was obviously far closer to the situation that any of us and perhaps when she mentions Mackenzie’s “mental illness” we should pay attention to the MIND ALTERING DRUGS they are giving her.

Antidepressants produce horrifying nightmares, often sexual in nature, that are so vivid patients often begin to believe they are “remembering” something that happened to them when it is nothing more than the elevated serotonin levels producing the nightmares.

Of course their doctors as usual did not warn them to watch for that adverse reaction and yet another family is destroyed or another father’s or mother’s memory destroyed. Wake up to the real nightmare of these drugs and their impact upon our world! www.drugawareness.org

A man that I admired my entire life for his great contributions to the world in many areas and had great respect for was accused the same way by his own daughter who ALSO went on The Oprah show to discuss her new book on what her father supposedly did to her.

It did not matter at all that the entire family told everyone this woman was nuts and had no grasp on reality. Why should that stop Oprah?

So the woman was allowed to shatter this incredible man’s last few months of life by going public with her antidepressant-induced accusations. She even kidnapped her ailing father to force him to publicly confess what he had done to her. (Her father was so busy doing so much for the world that he would not have had a minute to do what she had accused him of anyway!!)

How absolutely ironically tragic is that years before I had given this man the very first copy of my book when it came out which has an entire chapter explaining this adverse reaction of False Memory Syndrome – a term never heard before the introduction of Prozac on the market.

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.NET
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

ORIGINAL ARTICLE: http://www.spinner.com/2009/09/24/radio-stations-wrestle-with-playing-john-phillips
Radio Stations Wrestle With Playing John Phillips

Posted on Sep 24th 2009 5:15PM by James Sullivan
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Oldies radio stations around the country are debating whether to continue playing the music of one of the quintessential ’60s groups, the Mamas and the Papas, in the wake of Mackenzie Phillips’ allegations that she had an incestuous relationship with her father, group founder John Phillips.

“I just had a long discussion with our morning show team,” said Jay Beau Jones, program director of Boston’s WODS, “Oldies 103.3,” a long-running CBS Radio affiliate. On Friday morning, disc jockeys Chris Zito and Karen Blake will invite their audience to call in and talk about Phillips and his musical legacy. “Obviously, this is a horrific, car-crash type of story,” says Jones. “If the station plays ‘California Dreamin” or ‘Monday, Monday,’ my concern is the audience will have a negative reaction and turn off the radio.”

In contrast, Dan Allen, creator of Clear Channel’s “Real Oldies” format, says he doesn’t anticipate any lasting boycott of the band’s music. “If we stop playing them, who are we going to hurt?” he says. “I don’t think we can punish John Phillips,” who died in 2001.

If true, Allen adds, Mackenzie Phillips’ claims are “abhorrent. I have two daughters myself. But I don’t think it’s going to cause a backlash.”

After giving PEOPLE magazine excerpts from her new memoir, ‘High on Arrival,’ Mackenzie Phillips appeared on ‘Oprah’ and ‘Today’ this week, repeating her claim that her father raped her while both were under the influence of drugs, and that the two had intermittent sexual relations during the next 10 years.

“My father abused me, but he wasn’t a monster,” she writes. “He was a tortured man who led a tortured existence.”

John Phillips, the son of a hard-drinking ex-Marine, grew up in Alexandria, Va., breaking into music on the folk scene of New York’s Greenwich Village in the early 1960s. With two fellow folk veterans, Canadian Denny Doherty and Baltimore product “Mama” Cass Elliot, and a young Californian named Michelle Gilliam — who would become his second wife — he started the Mamas and the Papas. The folk-rock quartet’s combination of exuberant group vocals, saloon-style piano and lush arrangements by some of the West Coast’s best session musicians, led by drummer Hal Blaine, made the group a key part of California’s emergence at the center of the pop world.

Phillips was instrumental, along with producer Lou Adler, in the creation of the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, which introduced the Who, Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin to the American mainstream. He wrote and produced the Summer of Love anthem ‘San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair),’ recorded by his colleague Scott McKenzie (the inspiration for Mackenzie Phillips’ name), with whom he would co-write another huge hit, the Beach Boys’ ‘Kokomo,’ in 1988.

Scoring 10 Top 40 hits in two years, the Mamas and the Papas had a notoriously rocky relationship behind the scenes. Phillips wrote one of the group’s biggest hits, ‘I Saw Her Again,’ in response to Michelle’s affair with Doherty (which, curiously, Doherty sang lead on).

After decades of heavy drug use — Phillips once claimed he injected himself with cocaine and heroin every 15 minutes for two years — “Papa John,” as he titled his autobiography, had a liver transplant in 1992. He died at age 65 in March, 2001.

Sainthood is not exactly a prerequisite for election to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as the Mamas and the Papas were inducted in 1998.

“We don’t have any problem playing music by other people who have done heinous things,” says Clear Channel’s Allen. “Rockers ‘n’ rollers aren’t always good boys.”

Even so, few rock ‘n’ roll images have been tarnished quite as badly as John Phillips’ this week.

Michelle Phillips, the bandleader’s second of four wives, said this week that she does not believe her stepdaughter’s allegations.

“Mackenzie has a lot of mental illness,” she told the Hollywood Reporter. “She did ‘Celebrity Rehab’ and now she writes a book. The whole thing is timed.” (However, Michelle’s daughter, Chynna Phillips, has stated she believes her half-sister Mackenzie’s allegations.)

Cammy Blackstone, a longtime on-air personality on San Francisco’s KFRC who now works at San Francisco City Hall, had a similar reaction. Having interviewed Mackenzie Phillips on the radio, she wonders why the former child star of the ’70s sitcom ‘One Day at a Time’ would feel compelled to divulge her story now.

When Blackstone was on the air, there were numerous episodes involving core Oldies artists — Phil Spector’s murder case, James Brown’s domestic problems, accusations of child molestation against Michael Jackson and Gary Glitter. “I don’t recall any listeners every calling and saying, ‘Why are you playing that child molester?” she says.

WODS’s Jones also wonders where program directors should draw the line when it comes to unsavory news about popular artists: “Do you stop playing songs by Phil Spector or Elvis? Maybe our listeners want to hear ‘California Dreamin” and remember the Mamas and the Papas as the hit machine they were. We said, ‘Let’s let the audience decide.'”

Radio corporations do tend to reassess their playlists when news stories break, says Blackstone. “After 9/11, we didn’t play ‘Great Balls of Fire’ or ‘You Dropped a Bomb on Me.’ You do have to be considerate about people’s emotions over what’s happening in the news.”

But in the case of the Mamas and the Papas, although John Phillips was the group’s acknowledged mastermind, most listeners aren’t likely to “make that connection,” says Blackstone. “It’s the song more than the group.”

Allen agrees. “The face of the Mamas and the Papas without a doubt was Mama Cass,” he says. “And she did nothing wrong.”

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Juvenile Murders & Push for Use of Antidepressants in that Age Group Coincide

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): Note that the spiked increase in murders by juveniles came at the same time of the push for the use of antidepressants in juveniles. The push for use in juveniles came after a 1992 Oprah show where juveniles on these drugs were featured. The jump in use of SSRIs by juveniles from that time skyrocketed.

After murders committed by juveniles spiked in the early 1990s, states toughened laws, making the United States the harshest nation in world in the legal punishment of children, according to a recent study.

http://www.kansascity.com/105/v-print/story/1443770.html

Posted on Sun, Sep. 13, 2009

When children kill, punishment varies
By JOE LAMBE
The Kansas City Star
A Kansas City, Kan., girl charged with murder at age 13 faces adult court and many years in prison.

A boy who was 13 when he killed a man last year will stay in the juvenile system and could be released when he is 22½, a Wyandotte County judge ruled early this month.

Both cases illustrate how children who commit heinous crimes are testing the boundaries of the justice system.

After murders committed by juveniles spiked in the early 1990s, states toughened laws, making the United States the harshest nation in world in the legal punishment of children, according to a recent study. However, the number of children who killed declined in the late ’90s and has largely held steady this decade, leading some to question the practice of tougher sentencing.

“Some states are starting to recognize that kids can be treated as kids,” said Michele Deitch, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin and lead author of a study, “From Time Out to Hard Time.”

In 22 states, children as young as 7 still can be tried as adults. There is no age limit in Missouri, but it is 10 in Kansas. As of June, juveniles could not be sentenced to life without parole in seven states, including Kansas. That makes the United States the only nation in the world where juveniles can be sentenced to life without parole, the study reported.

All children who offend at age 12 or younger should be put into juvenile care, the Texas study contends. And it found that when they are put in adult prisons, juvenile offenders are five times more likely to be sexually assaulted and 36 times more likely to commit suicide.

Laurence Steinberg, author of “Rethinking Juvenile Justice” and a professor at Temple University in Philadelphia, believes that a 13-year-old is too young to be charged as an adult.

“You’re exposing kids to adult sanctions for something they did as a kid,” he said, “but no prosecutor is going to be able to run on the platform of ‘I gave somebody a break.’ ”

Weighing the facts

In the Wyandotte County cases, the similar situations are seemingly headed toward different outcomes.

Early this month, defense attorney Kiann McBratney successfully argued that Antwuan Taylor, the Kansas City, Kan., boy who killed last year at age 13, should not be tried as an adult and instead should stay in the juvenile system.

But McBratney, other prosecutors and some defense attorneys do support adult sentences for some children, saying society needs protection from them.

“There are kids out there who function like adults and can kill people in cold blood,” she said.

Robbin Wasson, the prosecutor in the Taylor case, said, “We don’t want to be prosecuting 13-year-olds willy-nilly as adults,” noting that decisions on juvenile offenders are made on a case-by-case basis.

The other juvenile charged in Wyandotte County last year with killing at age 13 was Keaira Brown, who this year became the youngest person ever sent to adult court there.

She allegedly shot 16-year-old Scott Sappington to death after an apparent botched carjacking attempt.

The victim’s grandmother, Joyce Sappington, said she had mixed emotions about the ruling, but children killing children “has got to stop. If nobody sends a message, it will never stop.”

Nationwide from 1985 to 2004, the study reports, judges transferred 961 children age 13 or younger to adult courts. That does not count children from states that have automatic transfer laws for crimes such as murder or states that allow prosecutors to directly file cases in adult court.

“You can have a teen who kills and goes automatically into the adult system and life without parole,” Deitch said. “That’s incomprehensible to me.”

Science and sentencing

Researchers have discovered that the section of the brain related to impulse control does not fully develop until the mid-20s, but that finding doesn’t necessarily help in the legal debate.

Some say it means children grow and change — what they are is not what they will become. Others say it means they are out of control and deadly.

The Supreme Court mentioned those brain studies in a 2005 Missouri case when it ruled that those younger than 18 when they killed could not be executed. That ruling took 72 people off death rows.

The ruling said children change, are less mature than adults, are more influenced by peers and are less to blame.

“Even a heinous crime committed by a juvenile,” the court said, “is not evidence of irretrievably depraved character.”

In the Taylor case in Wyandotte County, the boy was influenced by a 21-year-old woman who gave him a gun and suggested he kill someone. She drove him and picked out a victim, and Taylor shot Charles McElroy six times.

Barry Feld, a professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, said of the Taylor case and the woman’s influence: “It is the absolute paradigm of what the Supreme Court was talking about.”

Thirteen is too young for adult prosecution, he said, but for older children, he has raised questions about whether juvenile court is appropriate.

A “youth discount” is a sentencing method that Feld advocates. “A 14-year-old gets 25 percent of the going rate for the same crime by an adult, a 16-year-old gets about 50 percent,” he said.

Deitch praised another approach sometimes used by Kansas, Missouri and 25 other states. The laws generally allow a judge to combine a juvenile sentence with a further adult sentence if the offender fails in the juvenile system.

Wyandotte County District Judge Wes Griffin imposed the Kansas version of that approach in the Taylor case. Kansas officials say it has been rarely used — only in seven cases of 348 juveniles sent to the state juvenile system last year.

Missouri also rarely uses its version but has had good success, officials said. From 1999 to 2006, they said, 36 people were released after serving their juvenile time. Only six committed other crimes.

Atharene McElroy, mother of the victim in the Taylor case, is satisfied that her son’s killer is staying in juvenile court.

“He’s just a young, troubled boy,” she said, but he is dangerous and needs to be off the streets while he matures.

To reach Joe Lambe, call 816-234-7714 or send e-mail to jlambe@kcstar.com.

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