ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Famous Supermodel Jumps Six Floors to Her Death: Columbia

Paragraph 2 reads: “According to a Colombian newspaper, police are
confirming that Marulanda leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia
apartment. Reports are also indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a
result of a recent separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The
stress of the split and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on
antidepressants to help her cope with her most recent troubles. According to
reports, Lina had only been married to Onate for four months.”

http://www.rightcelebrity.com/?p=8523

Lina Marulanda, a famous and successful supermodel from Columbia has died
at the young age of 29. She was born on May 15th, 1980 in Medellin,
Colombia. Not only was Marulanda a popular television host, but she will be
remembered as one of Columbia’s most successful models. The news came April 22,
2010 that Lina jumped to her death, falling from her sixth floor apartment,
surely to be devastating news to those close to her.

According to a Colombian newspaper, police are confirming that Marulanda
leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia apartment. Reports are also
indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a result of a recent
separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The stress of the split
and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on antidepressants to help her
cope with her most recent troubles. According to reports, Lina had only been
married to Onate for four months.

Lina started modeling at the age of 12 years of age and went on to work as
a television presenter on the Colombian news show, CM&Y Caracol.

There has been no official statement from Lina’s family, friends or
employer. Our thoughts go out to her family and friends. This has to be
devastating news for those close to Lina Marulanda.

621 total views, no views today

PROZAC: Man Engaged in Massive Self-Mutilation: Lawsuit: Illinois

Paragraph five reads: “Gay wants to go back on Busper, though,
as he says Prozac sexually frustrates him and causes his
stomach to hurt. In addition, during the 11 months that Gay took Prozac,
he cut his testicles, arms, thighs and neck, all of which required
sutures,
the complaint says.”

http://www.madisonrecord.com/news/226207-plaintiff-wants-psychiatrist-to-prescribe-medicine-to-stop-selfmutilation

Plaintiff wants psychiatrist to prescribe medicine to stop self
mutilation
4/21/2010 12:00 PM By Kelly Holleran

A man claims he has cut numerous parts of his body, including his
testicles, because his former psychiatrist refused to prescribe him the correct
medication.

Anthony Gay filed a lawsuit April 12 in Madison County
Circuit Court against Claudia Kachigian.

Gay claims he self mutilates
himself because of anxiety problems. The only medication that prevents Gay from
cutting himself is Busper, according to the complaint. Gay claims he explained
the scenario to his psychiatrist, Kachigian.

However, Kachigian allegedly
refused to prescribe the medication to Gay because it’s a nonformulary
medication, according to the complaint. Instead, she prescribed him Prozac on
April 26, 2009, the suit states.

Gay wants to go back on Busper, though,
as he says Prozac sexually frustrates him and causes his stomach to hurt. In

addition, during the 11 months that Gay took Prozac, he cut his testicles, arms,
thighs and neck, all of which required sutures, the complaint
says.

Finally, on March 8, Kachigian discontinued Gay’s Prozac and on
March 29, she discontinued his psychiatric services, which has caused Gay
additional emotional distress, he claims.

Gay, who will be representing
himself, wants the court to order an independent psychiatrist to examine his
needs. He seeks compensatory and punitive damages.

Madison County
Circuit Court case number: 10-L-416.

467 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Patients Report 20 Times More Side Effects Than Doctors Report

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

In answer to the question asked in the title of this article,
“Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?,” I should remind you of the comment made by the psychiatric nurse who
attended one of my lectures a couple of years ago. After listening to me discuss
the potential side effects of SSRI antidepressants she stood and said, “Dr.
Tracy we never get to hear what you have shared with us here tonight, but I know
it is true because I am on Lexapro and have suffered nearly every one of the

side effects you mentioned. But you do not know what is going on out here. At
least 75% of the doctors and nurses I work with are on these drugs! The drug
reps are telling them they are in a stressful profession and will surely end up
suffering depression as a result so they need to get started on these drugs now
in order to help prevent that.”

Of course my first response was, “With these drugs affecting
the memory so strongly as to cause “amnesia” as a frequent side effect, if you
cannot even remember who you are, how do you remember what your patients
need?”
She admitted that they do not remember and have to constantly
remind one another and then they attribute it to old age setting
in.
So perhaps by the time these doctors get around to reporting
the patientsside effects they have forgotten what those side effects were that
they were to report. Of course these drugs also produce much more business
for the doctors by producing side effects and bringing patients back in for
follow up treatment so there is also a financial incentive to not report and
give the drugs a bad record. No matter the reason it is clear that the
situation is causing a very serious situation for patients and public safety in
general.
Paragraph three reads:  “The investigators followed 300
patients who were in ongoing outpatient treatment for depression
over six weeks. The authors compared what the patient reported on a
standardized scale of 31 different side effects (Toronto Side

Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating psychiatrist
on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect between
psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects
reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris.
When the investigators concentrated on
those side effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still

reported 2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/charting-the-depths/201004/why-dont-psychiatrists-notice-when-patients-experience-medication-si

Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?

If side effects fall in the forest, do they make a sound?

Published on April 20, 2010

A rich scientific study raises more

questions than it answers.

This point is exempified by new work conducted
at Rhode Island Hospital and published in the Journal of Clinical
Psychiatry
.

The investigators followed 300 patients who were in
ongoing outpatient treatment for depression over six weeks. The authors compared
what the patient reported on a standardized scale of 31 different side effects
(Toronto Side Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating
psychiatrist on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect
between psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects

reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris. When the investigators concentrated on those side
effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still reported
2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.

The authors summarize their provocative findings in mild
language, “The findings of the present study indicate that clinicians do not
record in their progress notes most side effects reported on a side effects

questionnaire by psychiatric
outpatients receiving ongoing pharmacological treatment for depression.”

Obviously
all is not well in the state of Demark. Although the findings concern the
treatment of depression, they raise broader questions about the doctor-patient
relationship.

Why is there such a massive disconnect between what
psychiatrists and patients report, on something so basic as whether prescribed
medications are having untoward effects? Do psychiatrists not ask enough
questions about side effects? Do psychiatrists not dig deep enough into

patients‘ responses? Are psychiatrists hearing what patients say, but not
documenting it in their notes? Or is the problem more on the patient side? Are
patients reluctant to speak candidly to their doctors about side effects (i.e.,
yes, I am having problems with sexual functioning)? Or do patients freeze up and
forget their experiences when asked in the heat of the moment (it is easier to
respond to a standardized list of side effects using pencil and paper)? Or is it
the situation that is to blame for this disconnect? Are patient-doctor
interactions in this day and age simply too rushed to insure efficient or
effective transfer of information?

Whatever the explanation,
psychiatrists appear to believe that patients are having fewer problems with
medications than they truly are. It is hard to see how psychiatrists can act in
the best interest of their patients if they do not know what their patients are
experiencing!!!!

The researchers recommend the use of a self-administered
patient questionnaire in clinical practice to improve the recognition of side

effects for patients in treatment. This study reveals a chasm of
misunderstanding between doctors and patients. This recommendation is a
sensible, but baby, step towards narrowing
it…

423 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Star D Study – Only 3% Remission, Not 67%

Last paragraph reads:  “”Although the study‘s reports make no
mention of this outcome, their data show that after a year of continuation
treatment following remission, of the 4,041 patients who entered the program
only 108 (3%) had a sustained remission — all the other patients either dropped
out or relapsed. Yet STAR*D‘s authors and the NIMH have publicized the study as
showing a 67% success rate for

antidepressants.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mad-in-america/201005/update-the-stard-report
May 19, 2010, Psychiatry

Update on the STAR*D Report
The
documented recovery rate in the STAR*D trial–worse than thought?
Published
on May 19, 2010

Two months ago, I wrote a post about a New Yorker
article that reported that 67% of the depressed patients in the STAR*D trial
“recovered.” As I noted in that post, the 67% figure was a highly exaggerated
number. Only 51% of the 3,671 patients who entered the trial ever remitted, even
for a short period. Furthermore, only about 20% of the patients remitted and
then reported to STAR*D investigators, at some point during a 12-month follow-up
period, that they were still doing well.

But this left an obvious
question, one that I hadn’t been able to find an answer to in the published

STAR*D reports. How many of the 3,671 people who entered the trial remitted and
then stayed well and in the trial throughout the entire 12-month follow-up? That
number would provide a documented long-term recovery rate for patients in the
trial.

A few days ago, Allan Leventhal sent me a 2009 article he
coauthored with David Antonuccio, and in it, they successfully identified this
number (finding it in a confusing graphic I hadn’t been able to decipher.) In
their computations, they relied on STAR*D reports that told of 4,041 initial
participants (3,671 was the number of “enrolled” patients counted in the
analysis of drug-remission rates), and then they came to this bottom-line
conclusion about the documented long-term recovery rate:

“Although the

study‘s reports make no mention of this outcome, their data show that after a
year of continuation treatment following remission, of the 4,041 patients who
entered the program only 108 (3%) had a sustained remission — all the other
patients either dropped out or relapsed. Yet STAR*D‘s authors and the NIMH have
publicized the study as showing a 67% success rate for antidepressants.”

422 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Jumps From Brooklyner: First Suicide Ever in Bldg…

Paragraph five reads: “Diaz added that Paek reportedly suffered from clinical depression, and that she was on medication.”

http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/33/16/33_16_sb_brooklyner_suicide.html?comm=1

First suicide at Brooklyn’s tallest building

By Stephen Brown
The Brooklyn Paper

A woman jumped to her death from roof of the Brooklyner the borough’s tallest building last week, police said.

Thirty-year-old Jennifer Paek plummeted from the roof of the 51-story building on Lawrence Street between Willoughby Street and Myrtle Avenue in Downtown and landed on the seventh-floor terrace of the Metrotech office building next door at around 12:55 pm.

She was dead on the spot.

NYPD spokeswoman Mindy Diaz said that the dead woman lived on the 18th floor of the distinctive tower with her husband and had left suicide notes in their apartment.

Diaz added that Paek reportedly suffered from clinical depression, and that she was on medication.

The tragic suicide is likely the first of its kind for the Brooklyner, which opened early this year.

©2010 Community Newspaper Group

596 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 26 Year Old Man Assaults 16 Year Old Girl: Scotland

Paragraph 18 reads:  “He had attempted suicide by an
overdose and
was taking medication for
depression at the time of the offence.”

Paragraph 16
reads:  ” ‘Jim Stephenson, defending, told the High Court in Edinburgh
Smith wanted to apologise to the victim.  ‘He cannot believe he carried
out these acts,
‘  he said. ‘

http://news.scotsman.com/scotland/Rapist-such-a-risk-that.5886765.jp

Rapist such a risk that he’ll be under watch until he dies

Published Date: 05 December 2009
By JOHN ROBERTSON

A MAN who held a schoolgirl captive for seven hours and then raped her
was given a life sentence yesterday.


Ryan Smith, 26, snatched the teenager off the street and
kept her in his home overnight. She was allowed to leave after giving him a
kiss.

A judge was told that Smith, from Saughton, Edinburgh, had been
assessed as posing a “very high risk” to the public and to women in
particular.

He had earlier admitted abducting, assaulting and raping the
16yearold girl on 8 February.

The girl had never met Smith before, but
they had a mutual friend and she was in a group that was at his flat that night.

The men were drunk and there was a row between Smith and one of the
others in the street. The girl was walking away from the scene when she heard
Smith say: “You’re dead.”

He grabbed her by the neck and pushed her
against a hedge, and then dragged her into his flat.

Neil Beardmore,
prosecuting, said: “She was crying and trying to break free, but was unable to
do so. It was about midnight … there was no-one passing in the
street.”

Smith threw the girl on to a bed, and lay down beside her. He
put his hand over her mouth when someone came to the door, and then indecently
assaulted her.

She repeatedly told him to stop and hit him, but he bit
her on the arm.

“He would alternate between making threats and being
apologetic,” Mr Beardmore said.

“This continued throughout the night and
she considered trying to escape but was afraid of what the accused might do if
he caught her. She was continually in fear of her safety and her
life.”

At about 7am, Smith raped the girl, as she pleaded to go home and
was crying and shaking.

As he allowed her to leave, he told her she
would be “battered” and “killed” if she told the police.

The girl

revealed what had happened to a friend, and the police were contacted.

Mr Beardmore said she had suffered nightmares and now feared sleeping
alone or going out alone.

Jim Stephenson, defending, told the High Court
in Edinburgh Smith wanted to apologise to the victim. “He cannot believe he
carried out these acts,” he said.

The court heard Smith had an alcohol
dependency and had received treatment at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital.

He had attempted suicide by an overdose and was taking medication for
depression at the time of the offence.

His criminal record included
convictions for fireraising, and serious assault against a woman.

The
judge, Lord Brailsford, ordered that Smith must serve a minimum of seven years
before he could apply for parole.

He imposed an order for lifelong
restriction, and said Smith required treatment for underlying psychological
problems.

“An order for lifelong restriction is the only means the court
has of ensuring you will not be released until such time as the risk you pose
has been evaluated as being at an acceptable level,” Lord Brailsford
said.

If and when Smith is released, he will remain on licence for life
and be liable to be recalled to custody.

Page 1 of 1

348 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Makes Teenage Girl Angry All the Time: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How tragic that this poor young woman would have to turn to
the Dear Abby column (or whatever they call it now) for help with this! Why
would her own doctor not know enough to explain to her that this antidepressant
is causing her blood sugar to drop producing adrenalin rushes as the body’s
attempt to normalize sugar? Since adrenalin is your fight or flight hormone it
is no wonder she is angry all the time and no wonder it affects relationships as
the patients become meaner and meaner when they cannot control their blood sugar
levels due to the effects of these drugs.

You ask if she has been screened for diabetes? I may not show
up yet, but soon will with her pancreas experiencing that strong of a negative
effect from the antidepressant. This is a very bright young woman to be able to
notice what effect this drug is having upon her. And her mother may change her
mind about having her daughter take the antidepressant when her daughter
violently attacks her in a rage produced by the drug! What a shame her
mother is not listening to her as she cries out for help knowing what
violence the drugs are causing her to be capable of, yet frightened to verbalize
those horribly violent thoughts previously so completely foreign to
her.
__________________________________
Last part of paragraph two reads:  ” However, the
antidepressant causes me to be uncontrollably angry
all the time.
I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which just adds to
my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect my
relationships with friends and family.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091130/LIFE/911300302/-1/ENTERTAIN

Teen frets taking her antidepressants

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
November 30, 2009 12:00
AM

Dear Annie: I am a 16-year-old girl who still wets the bed. I have
tried everything from wearing an alarm to taking medication.

I am now on
a prescription that works by telling my kidneys to stop producing urine,
although it doesn’t work all the time. A urologist prescribed an antidepressant

that prevents me from sleeping too deeply. With the combination of these two
medicines, I no longer wet the bed. However, the antidepressant causes me to be
uncontrollably angry all the time. I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which
just adds to my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect
my relationships with friends and family.

My mom wants me to keep taking
it because it works. But, Annie, I don’t like being angry all the time, and I
don’t want to be on medication for the rest of my life. What can I
do?

­ At a Loss

Dear At a Loss: Most teens with enuresis are
exceedingly deep sleepers, and many also have a small bladder, exacerbating the

problem. We assume you have been screened for diabetes and a genetic link, and
that you don’t drink alcohol. Many sufferers do well with a moisture-sensor
alarm, and we’re sorry that doesn’t work for you. The other common treatment is
the medication you currently are using. However, since you are having unpleasant
side effects, please discuss this with your doctor. It’s possible your dosage
can be altered so you can still get the benefits without such a big emotional
swing. Also discuss exercises to strengthen and enlarge your bladder. For more
information and to keep abreast of new developments, contact the National Kidney
Foundation (kidney.org) at 1-888-WAKE-DRY
(1-888-925-3379).

550 total views, no views today

ZOLOFT: 12 Year Old Boy Kills 5 Week Old Infant: Georgia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

I could not even begin to count the number of times that a
child on Zoloft has told me of both thoughts and plans to kill that they
developed on Zoloft. Eric Harris, the lead shooter at Columbine, had those
thoughts within three weeks on Zoloft and found them to be so disturbing to him
that he reported it and they took him off Zoloft and put him on another
antidepressant. [What is the definition of insanity? Doing the same thing and
expecting a different result – the other antidepressant, Luvox, ended up
producing thoughts of killing intense enough to result in the largest school
shooting the world had ever witnessed at that point.] I even had a case of a 5

year old boy in Southern Utah who had such intense feelings of homicide that he
told his family he was going to have the police come and kill them
all.

Check out our database of cases at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org to find more cases
like this of children killing while under the influence of
antidepressants.
Paragraph 29 reads:  “While the boy continued to refuse,
Curtis spoke to police when he was out of the room. She told them the boy was in
counseling, that he had been fighting at school, that he had been prescribed

Zoloft and a mood stabilizing medicine. Then, Curtis provided a tearful account
of what he said happened.”

http://www.tampabay.com/news/courts/criminal/infants-mother-testifies-as-tampa-boy-stands-trial-in-georgia-murder/1057496

Infant‘s mother testifies as Tampa boy stands trial in Georgia

death

By Alexandra
Zayas
, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Thursday,
December 10, 2009

MARIETTA, Ga. ­ On the Fourth of July, Brittiany
Young returned to her car in a Target parking lot and put it in reverse. That’s
when she noticed the swollen mouth of her 5weekold daughter,
Millan.

Young put the car in park and turned to her cousin, a 12yearold

Tampa boy she had left alone with the baby.

“What did you do?” she asked.
“What did you do to her?”

The mother testified Wednesday morning in a
Cobb County, Ga., courtroom, where the Tampa boy faces charges of felony murder
and cruelty to children. He has pleaded not guilty. Juvenile Court Judge A.
Gregory Poole will decide the case without a jury.

The unidentified boy
­ a court order keeps his name secret ­ was visiting relatives July 4
outside Atlanta when his cousin stopped at the Target to pick up food for a
picnic. According to court testimony, the 22-yearold mother left the keys in
the ignition and the air conditioning on as she shopped at the store for 18
minutes. When Young returned, the boy was playing on his cell phone in the back
seat. The radio was turned louder. And the infant was not responsive.

The
baby girl was taken off life support the next day. A medical examiner found
multiple skull fractures and ruled the cause of death blunt force trauma to the
head.

The boy has remained in Georgia since July, first locked up in a
juvenile detention center, then transferred to a secure group
home.

Authorities said nothing specific about how they think the baby
died until Wednesday morning.

“Something so horrific happened that
pictures don’t do it justice,” prosecutor Eleanor Odom said in her opening
statement. “That child’s head was bashed in.”

The boy‘s attorney, Derek
Wright, had another word to describe the prosecution’s case:
“Impossible.”

He said prosecutors would not be able to provide a scenario
showing exactly what act of violence befell the baby ­ no weapon, no points
of impact in the car.

By Wednesday night, they still had not.

• •

In the courtroom, the sixth-grader wore a gold suit ­ like the one
he wore to his elementary school graduation.

When his mother, his father
and his great-aunt cried ­ when the baby’s mother cried ­ he remained
composed.

But emergency responders who first arrived at the scene
testified that they saw him pacing and sobbing. They noted a different, more
calm reaction from the mother. Paramedic Pierce Summers saw her later at the
hospital.

“For someone that had had a child in that circumstance, it was
surprising,” he said, “like she was kind of lost in a fog.”

Young
described what her baby looked like in the car: eyes swollen and hard to the
touch; blood on her mouth or nose; limp.

On July 5, the baby girl was
deemed brain dead and taken off life support. The prosecutor asked the mother,
“Were you there when Millan died?”

She paused to wipe tears. Then, she
said, “yes.”

After the judge ordered a break and the infant‘s mother left
the stand, the boy burst into tears. He stood up, turned around and looked at
his mother, who stood up from a bench and kissed his forehead.

• •

For much of the day and into the night, the prosecution focused on
three videotaped interviews the boy gave detectives.

The third was the
subject of an hourslong debate. The defense fought hard to have it suppressed,
saying the boy was forced to give incriminating statements.

During the
first, the boy told detectives what he told the baby’s mother: The baby began to
cry, so he tried to give her a pacifier. She spit it out, so he tried to give
her a bottle of water. She kept screaming, and was scratching her face. He
turned the radio loud, and it appeared she went to sleep.

The boy‘s story
didn’t stray far from his original account in his second interview, which he
gave the day after the baby was pronounced dead.

“If you accidentally
hurt Millan, would you tell us?” the detective asked.

“Yes,” the boy

said. “I didn’t accidentally hurt her. . . . I don’t want to hurt a
baby.”

But a couple of hours after he gave that interview ­ while
their entire family was gathered at the baby’s mother’s house ­ the boy‘s
mother, Camille Curtis, brought him back to speak with police. This time, she
was crying. She said he had told her something.

“It was just an
accident,” Curtis said. “He said he was scared. I asked him. He told me. He
thought I was going to be mad.”

Detectives asked the boy if he wanted to
talk. The boy shook his head.

While the boy continued to refuse, Curtis
spoke to police when he was out of the room. She told them the boy was in
counseling, that he had been fighting at school, that he had been prescribed

Zoloft and a mood stabilizing medicine. Then, Curtis provided a tearful account
of what he said happened.

She said he told her the baby started choking
when he tried to give her the bottle. He lifted her to his chest to burp her,
and she fell out of his hands.

The boy told the baby’s mother he was
sorry, Curtis said.

At that point in the videotape, the police told her
that this story didn’t match the injuries. The video shows her pleading with her
son to tell the police the truth, that he wouldn’t be allowed to go home until
he did.

He tells her he wiped the baby’s blood with a blanket, and that
he accidentally hit her with his elbow while trying to pick her up off the
floor.

Just before midnight on the videotape, when it appeared the boy
was about to talk, the judge stopped the tape.

“I find this to be
inherently unfair,” the judge said. “This child is so scared . . . literally in
a corner. His mother is pressuring him. How many times does the kid say he
doesn’t want to talk?”

With that, the judge struck the entire third
interview from the record. None of it will factor into the decision he will make
this week.

The trial continues today.

Alexandra Zayas can be
reached at azayas@sptimes.com or (813) 310-2081.

[Last modified: Dec
09, 2009 11:29 PM]

________________________________________

Judge’s
Verdict: Guilty, but not of murder

Dressed in a shirt and tie, the skinny, dimpled boy stayed calm as the
judge delivered his verdict: “I find beyond a reasonable doubt that Millan
suffered major trauma during the 18 minutes the juvenile was alone with the
baby. … I find that the juvenile caused the injuries and that the baby later
died as a result of the trauma.

“Now, what do I think happened? This child was left alone with the baby.
I don’t know that should have happened, but it did …

“Millan, a child he really didn’t know, started crying, and it got louder

“He didn’t know what to do. I think he was scared. He tried using the
pacifier to make this baby stop crying. It didn’t work. What did he do
next?

“He got out the bottle of water … He gives it to the baby. The baby won’t
be quiet. Turns up the radio so he won’t have to hear this baby crying. That
didn’t work. He might have even turned it up again. Well, the pink pacifier
didn’t work. Let’s use the purple pacifier …

“This juvenile was trying to get the baby to quit crying. … He was
scared, and he didn’t know what to do. … I wouldn’t expect him to know what to
do.

“I find that in order to get the baby to be quiet, using his own means as
a 12yearold, that he committed batteries, plural, against this baby

“Did this child mean that his actions would kill Millan? No …

“Technically, I think I can find possibly if I wanted to go further, some
type of an involuntary manslaughter. In my mind, I’ve still got to place this
child with some expectation, some appreciation for the horrific damage that it
has done, and I find nothing along those lines.

“Did he do wrong? Oh yeah, he did. I wish it hadn’t happened, but it
did.”

Tampa
boy, 12, found not guilty of murder in infant‘s death

By Alexandra Zayas,
Times Staff Writer
In Print:
Saturday, December 12, 2009

MARIETTA,
Ga. — The 12yearold Tampa boy sat in the Cobb County Juvenile Courthouse
Friday morning, still an accused baby murderer. A few hours later, he chomped on
potato chips and Skittles and asked to go to the all-you-can-eat buffet at
Golden Corral. He told his family he had plans for his future.

“I want to
be a judge,” he said. “I want to go to Harvard.”

This
announcement came after one made by Judge A. Gregory Poole: The boy was not
guilty of murder and child cruelty in the July death of his 5weekold cousin,
Millan
Young. He was guilty of a lesser offense, two counts of battery, which could
carry a two-year sentence, served either in a detention center, a group home, or
as probation while living with family. The sentence will come with
counseling.

The judge
will decide it on Jan. 6.

Had the boy
been convicted of murder, he would have faced nine years in detention.

As they
prepared to leave the courthouse, the boy‘s grandmother wrapped him in a tight
hug and told him, “See how God delivered you?”

He
responded, “Yes, ma’am.”

• • •

For three
days, lawyers tried to convince a judge of what they thought happened inside a
parked car on July 4.

The boy, his
name kept secret by court order, was visiting relatives near Atlanta when he got
into a car with his mother’s 22-yearold first cousin Brittiany Young and her
infant daughter. Young stopped at Target to get food and left the car
running.

When she
returned, she testified, the boy was playing on his cell phone. The radio was
turned up. And the baby’s mouth was swollen. Her lips were blue. Her eyes were
hard to the touch. She was limp and not breathing. The baby died the following
day.

Three
doctors testified about the child’s injuries: two types of brain hemorrhages,
retinal hemorrhages, unrelated fractures on opposite sides of her head, and
bruising of the mouth and other parts of her body. Tissue on her upper lip was
bruised, something that happens when babies are force-fed.

They said
the injuries weren’t accidental but couldn’t determine who caused them. The
medical examiner called it a homicide, finding that the child must have been
held firmly, shaken and slammed at least twice against a hard, flat surface.

Crime lab
tests found no physical evidence in the car. Prosecutors had testimony that the
baby was acting normally before the mother left the car and was unresponsive
when she returned.

In closing
statements Friday, defense attorney Derek Wright tried to convince the judge
that prosecutors didn’t prove the boy was the murderer. He said he could make a
case against the baby’s mother, noting that several emergency responders said
Young was acting unusually calm when they arrived, but that the boy was sobbing
and pacing. He suggested the possibility that the baby was injured at the
mother’s home minutes away but didn’t show signs of trauma until the parking
lot.

The baby’s
mother sat in the courtroom on a bench closest to the door. She stared ahead
with tears in her eyes as Wright said she could have let her cousin take the
blame.

Prosecutor
Eleanor Odom argued that the baby’s mother didn’t appear distraught because she
didn’t yet know the extent of the baby’s injuries, but that the boy already
did.

Odom took a
blood-stained, pink onesie out of an evidence bag and showed it to the
judge.

“You can see
the size, how big Millan really was,” Odom said. “I think this speaks more words
than those pictures ever could.”

Dressed in a
shirt and tie, the skinny, dimpled boy stayed calm as the judge delivered his
verdict: “I find beyond a reasonable doubt that Millan suffered major trauma
during the 18 minutes the juvenile was alone with the baby. … I find that the
juvenile caused the injuries and that the baby later died as a result of the
trauma.

“Now, what
do I think happened? This child was left alone with the baby. I don’t know that
should have happened, but it did …

“Millan, a
child he really didn’t know, started crying, and it got louder …

“He didn’t
know what to do. I think he was scared. He tried using the pacifier to make this
baby stop crying. It didn’t work. What did he do next?

“He got out
the bottle of water … He gives it to the baby. The baby won’t be quiet. Turns up
the radio so he won’t have to hear this baby crying. That didn’t work. He might
have even turned it up again. Well, the pink pacifier didn’t work. Let’s use the
purple pacifier …

“This
juvenile was trying to get the baby to quit crying. … He was scared, and he
didn’t know what to do. … I wouldn’t expect him to know what to do.

“I find that
in order to get the baby to be quiet, using his own means as a 12yearold, that
he committed batteries, plural, against this baby …

“Did this
child mean that his actions would kill Millan? No …

“Technically, I
think I can find possibly if I wanted to go further, some type of an involuntary
manslaughter. In my mind, I’ve still got to place this child with some
expectation, some appreciation for the horrific damage that it has done, and I
find nothing along those lines.

“Did he do
wrong? Oh yeah, he did. I wish it hadn’t happened, but it did.”

Once the
judge stopped talking, the boy started to cry. His parents embraced him, also in
tears. His mother smiled.

The baby’s
mother left the courtroom after the verdict and declined to comment. The boy‘s
grandmother said the family planned to gather at Brittiany Young’s home later
that day.

The judge
needed to decide where the boy would stay until the sentencing. He was
originally locked up in a juvenile detention center, but later transferred to a
secured group home.

A
representative from the group home told the judge the boy had a tough transition
into his school and, due to the stresses of his case, sometimes shut down
emotionally. But he said the boy was a role model and standout student.

The judge
allowed him to return to the group home and said he was welcome to visit with
family. He told the boy his behavior in the next month will be important in
deciding a sentence. The boy promised to be good.

Then, the
boy‘s attorney told the family, “Y’all go breathe.”

• • •

The boy‘s
grandmother, Joyce Hightower, couldn’t sleep Thursday night. She’d driven from
Tampa earlier that day and spent the night reading news about the case and
praying.

Now, holding
her grandson’s hand, she asked him how he felt.

“Good,” he
told her. “Anxious.”

“Anxious for
what?” she asked.

He said, “To
go home.”

Alexandra
Zayas can be reached at azayas@sptimes.com or (813)
310-2081.

469 total views, no views today

ZOLOFT: Charges of DUI & Child Endangerment: Florida

Paragraph seven reads:  “Smith told deputies she had not
been drinking, but was on several medicines including Zoloft.
According to the report, Smith would not blow the required amount of air
into the Breathalyzer. The small amount that registered recorded a 0.13 blood
alcohol content.”


http://www.ocala.com/article/20091026/ARTICLES/910269989/1340/NEWS?Title=Mother-arrested-in-McDonald-s-parking-lot-charged-with-child-neglect-DUI

Mother arrested in McDonald’s parking lot, charged with child neglect,
DUI

Staff report

Published: Monday, October 26, 2009
at 11:41 a.m.
Last Modified: Monday, October 26, 2009 at 11:44 a.m.

OCALA – An Ocala woman was arrested on Sunday and charged with drunken
driving and child neglect after she reportedly drove to McDonald’s while she was
drunk and transporting a 5-year-old boy.

According to a Marion County
Sheriff’s Office report, Nekisha Smith, 29, drove to the McDonald’s at 9737 SE
Maricamp Road in a blue Kia.

An employee became concerned after the woman
ordered with slurred speech and smelled of alcohol, according to the report.
Smith then asked for things she didn’t order, such as a “double chicken burger
thing.”

The employee told Smith to pull forward while her food cooked and
called deputies, according to the report.

When Deputy Gary Miller
arrived, Smith was parked in the car eating. Smith told deputies she was just
tired and had been drinking the day before.

According to the report,
Smith failed all field sobriety tests and was arrested. The child‘s father
picked up the boy and the car.

Smith told deputies she had not been
drinking, but was on several medicines including Zoloft. According to the
report, Smith would not blow the required amount of air into the Breathalyzer.
The small amount that registered recorded a 0.13 blood alcohol
content.

Deputies then contacted the Department of Children and
Families.

Smith was being held in the Marion County Jail in lieu of

$5,500 bail. Smith was arrested in 2006 for DUI with property
damage.

-Jackie Alexander/Star Banner

All rights reserved. This
copyrighted material may not be re-published without permission. Links are
encouraged.

428 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder Attempt: Architect Tries to Smother Wife: England

Last paragraph reads:  “The court heard that he had told
police officers that
he was on medication for
depression and had been drinking.”

“SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading

to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=426&storycode=3151544&channel=783&c=1&encCode=0000000001a5012c #

Architect attempted to smother his wife, court told

21 October, 2009

By Anna Winston

An architect has
been accused of attempting to smother his wife after she asked for a
divorce.

Clive Wille of Croydon based practice PCL, held his wife down on
their bed at the couple’s home in south London and attempted to smother her with
a pillow, jurors at the Old Bailey were told on Monday.

The prosecution
told the jury that Wille had been calm when he came home but became angry and
threatening when his wife told him she wanted a divorce.

Wille has denied
attempted murder but accepted a charge of threats to kill.

The court
heard that he had told police officers that he was on medication for depression
and had been drinking.

641 total views, no views today