ANTIDEPRESSANT-HYDROCODONE-ALCOHOL: Wrong-Way Crash: 4 Dead: Two Injured: TX

Paragraph 15 reads:  “After the wreck, DPS trooper Otto
Cabrera wrote in an arrest affidavit that he “could smell the strong odor of
metabolized alcohol from Looschen.” Looschen told Cabrera that he’d been
drinking and had taken antidepressants as well as
hydrocodone, according to the affidavit. Hydrocodone can be used as a cough
suppressant or a pain reliever.”

http://www.statesman.com/news/local/georgetown-man-pleads-guilty-in-fatal-2009-wreck-248382.html

Georgetown man pleads guilty in fatal 2009 wreck

Luke Anthony Looschen faces up to 100 years in prison for wrongway crash
on Texas 29.

By Miguel
Liscano

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Updated: 12:49 a.m.
Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010

Published: 8:54 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 17,
2010

A Georgetown man pleaded guilty Wednesday morning to four counts of
intoxication manslaughter and two counts of intoxication assault, admitting
guilt in causing a three-vehicle collision last summer that killed four people
and injured two others.

Luke Anthony Looschen, 48, entered his plea
before District Judge Burt Carnes in a Williamson County courtroom. A sentencing
hearing has been set for March 12 . He faces up to 100 years in
prison.

The guilty plea was not part of a plea agreement, Looschen’s
attorney Mike Davis and Williamson County Assistant District Attorney Robert
McCabe said in court.

“Mr. Looschen has acknowledged his guilt from the
get-go on this, and he felt the proper thing to do was to plead guilty,” Davis
said later.

Family members of those killed in the wreck wept in the
courtroom as Looschen entered his plea.

Looschen, who has been in the
Williamson County Jail with bail set at $600,000 since his arrest, showed no
visible emotion during the hearing.

“Did you use your truck as a deadly
weapon in this case?” McCabe asked.

“Yes, sir, I did,” Looschen
replied.

Because of that admission, Looschen must serve at least half of
the sentence he receives, and Carnes cannot sentence him to probation,
Williamson County District Attorney John Bradley said.

Looschen was
arrested Aug. 10 after troopers said he was driving a pickup east in a westbound
lane of Texas 29 near Jonah and collided head-on with a Jeep and a van carrying
seven people. The van slid down an embankment and struck a tree, according to a
Department of Public Safety crash report.

The driver of the Jeep was not
seriously injured, officials said.

In the van, Pete Mendez, 44, and Paula
Martinez, 38 , were pronounced dead at the scene, officials said. Two passengers
died later at University Medical Center Brackenridge: Crystal Martinez , the
16-year-old daughter of Paula Martinez and Clemente Martinez, the driver; and
Stephanie Valadez, 24, who was dating the couple’s son.

Valadez’s
daughter Tristan and son Jacob, who were 3 and 1, respectively, at the time of
the wreck, were treated at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple and
released.

Clemente Martinez was not seriously injured, officials
said.

After the wreck, DPS trooper Otto Cabrera wrote in an arrest
affidavit that he “could smell the strong odor of metabolized alcohol from
Looschen.” Looschen told Cabrera that he’d been drinking and had taken
antidepressants as well as hydrocodone, according to the affidavit. Hydrocodone

can be used as a cough suppressant or a pain reliever.

Blood test results
later revealed that Looschen’s blood alcohol content level was 0.16 , or twice
the legal limit of 0.08 , according to the DPS crash report. Looschen had been
in a previous one-vehicle accident on July 16 in Williamson County, which he
later discussed on his Facebook page. He said on the Web site that he had
totaled his truck and “sustained some scrapes, bruises and lacerations.” On Aug.
3, a few days before the fatal crash, he wrote on Facebook that he was getting a
replacement truck that day.

In 2006, Looschen was in a motorcycle
accident with his ex-wife, 43-year-old Shanan Looschen, in Georgetown, police
said.

Shanan Looschen was thrown from the motorcycle and died a day later
at Brackenridge, police said. Neither was wearing a helmet, police
said.

No charges were filed in either of the two earlier
wrecks.

mliscano@statesman.com;
246-1150

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Doctor Murders his 9 Year Old Son: Oklahoma

Last thee paragraphs read:  “He wrote he continued
psychotherapy until his graduation from medical school in June 1988.”

“He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized again for three days
in 1995 for acute depression.”

” ‘I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,’  Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. ‘I returned to work after my hospitalization on
adjusted dosages of
antidepressants
‘.”

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Wolf was seeing
a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication,

The Oklahoman has learned. His mental issues
date back to his first year of medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized
for major depression, his medical records show.”

http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten

Affidavit, calls detail brutal death of Nichols Hills boy, 9
Doctor,
arrested in son’s stabbing, battled mental problems, records show

BY NOLAN CLAY
Published: November 18,
2009

NICHOLS
HILLS
­ A doctor who has battled mental issues for years said his son

was the devil as he stabbed the boy to death Monday morning at their home,
according to a police affidavit and a 911 recording.
[]
Stephen
Paul Wolf The 51-yearold is being held in the Oklahoma County jail on a murder
complaint.

What the affidavit states …
Here is a description
from a police affidavit of events Monday morning when police officer Michael
Puckett arrived at Dr. Stephen P. Wolf’s Nichols Hills home:

The officer
was dispatched at 3:52 a.m. Monday to the house of a neighbor who called police
after Mary Wolf banged on the neighbor’s front door. The officer heard screaming
from Wolf’s house and met Mary Wolf at the open front door. She told the
officer, “He’s killing my son. He’s killing my son.”

The officer drew

his gun and went through the house, finding the doctor on his knees “wrestling
with something up against a cabinet door and a dishwasher.”

The officer
ordered Wolf to put his hands up. “At that time Mr. Wolf raised his hands to
about head level and looked back at Officer Puckett and said, ‘He’s got the
devil in him and you know it’ several times.”

The officer ordered Wolf,
who was covered in blood, to get on his stomach. Wolf complied. The officer then
saw the victim, Tommy, with a knife in his head and a knife in his chest.

“Mr. Wolf again started saying, ‘You know he’s got the devil in him’
several times over.”

The boy then began to convulse and “Mr. Wolf leapt
up off the floor and said, ‘He’s not dead’ and tried (to) grab a knife from the
body to continue the assault.” The police officer pulled Wolf by the neck and
shirt and Wolf fell and dropped a knife.

The officer kicked Wolf in the
head as Wolf tried to reach for the knife and punched him in the jaw when Wolf
tried to reach for the knife again. The officer then was able to toss the knife
away.

Another officer arrived and handcuffed the doctor.

Slain boy remembered
Tommy Wolf, 9, was remembered Tuesday as
a sweet boy.

“He was always creative and feisty,” said Kristin Moyer,
26, of Oklahoma City, who was a counselor at an after-school program at Casady
School when Tommy was a student in 2006.

“He was a little feisty kid,
but he wasn’t bad. Just a typical boy. He loved having fun with the rest of his

friends,” she said.

“He was a real sweet kid. He did have his share of
timeouts, just like the rest of them. But I really enjoyed him.”

Others
who knew the boy made similar comments online at NewsOK.com.

“I knew
Tommy through Cub Scouts,” wrote Cheldrea Mollett of Oklahoma City. “He was a
lovely, sweet and wonderful boy. God has him now, and he is at peace.”

NewsOK Related Articles

Stephen
Paul Wolf
, 51, is in the Oklahoma
County
jail on a murder complaint. His son, Tommy, was 9.

Wolf was
seeing a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication, The
Oklahoman
has learned. His mental issues date back to his first year of
medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized for major depression, his

medical records show.

He repeatedly told the police officer who broke up
the attack on his son, “He’s got the devil in him and you know it,” according to
the police arrest affidavit.

His wife, Mary
Wolf
, was making a 911 call during the attack. Police officer Michael
Puckett
can be heard on the recording telling the doctor, “Put your hands
behind your ——- back now!”

The doctor can be heard saying, “Mary,
he’s the devil.” Mary Wolf replies, “He’s not the devil.” She then says,
“Tommy.”

The doctor tried to stab his son again when the boy began
convulsing, even though the officer had his gun drawn, police reported. The
officer pulled the doctor away and then had to kick and strike the doctor in the
head to keep the doctor from getting a knife again.

The doctor attacked

his son in the kitchen of their $500,000 house at 1715 Elmhurst Ave., police
reported.

Wolf ­ covered in blood ­ was on top of his son when
the officer arrived shortly before 4 a.m. Monday, police reported. The victim
had “a knife lodged in the left upper section of his head and a knife stuck in
the upper right part of the chest,” police reported. The boy died at the home.
Mary Wolf was treated for cuts on her hands and face.

A neighbor, Douglas
Woodson
, told police the doctor “was under review at his hospital for anger
issues,” police reported in the affidavit. The neighbor also told police the

doctor “was supposed to go to a rehab facility for the anger plus drug and
alcohol abuse.”

Tommy was in the third grade at Christ the King
Catholic School
. His funeral is tentatively planned for Friday.

History of depression
The doctor specialized in internal medicine. St.
Anthony Hospital
said arrangements have been made with other doctors to
provide medical care to his patients.

The doctor’s attorney, Mack
Martin
, declined comment.

The doctor in 1991 told the medical
licensure board that he began psychotherapy when he was hospitalized for
depression during his first year of medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
. He said he took a year off from medical school.

“Through continuing psychotherapy unresolved conflicts from my early
childhood and adolescence were discovered,” he wrote in 1991. “I grieved for my
father for the first time. He died in an airplane crash three weeks before my
third birthday in 1961. I experienced the pain and loss of failed relationships
in high school. I felt anger toward my mother and stepfather because of problems
in our relationship.”

He wrote he continued psychotherapy until his
graduation from medical school in June 1988.

He told the board in 1996
that he was hospitalized again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a result of all of the stress in my busy practice of
internal medicine and all the demands in making the final arrangements for my
marriage,” Wolf wrote in a letter to the board. “I returned to work after my
hospitalization on adjusted dosages of antidepressants.”

Read more:
http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten#ixzz0XEj9aNVs

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PAXIL: Road Rage Death: Woman Drives on Wrong Side of Freeway: No Alcoh…

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: Why are police still looking for the reason why she
was driving the wrong way on the freeway when they already know she was on
Paxil? A large number of these cases of driving the wrong way on the freeway
involve these antidepressants.
__________________________________________________________

Paragraph one reads: "A Monroeville woman who died in a crash while
driving the wrong way on the Pennsylvania Turnpike was awaiting trial on two
cases involving drugged driving, according to court records."

Paragraphs eight and nine read: "Allegheny County Judge Jeffrey Manning
had issued an arrest warrant for Baker because she failed to appear July 15
for a hearing on drugged driving charges filed in April by Monroeville
police. Baker was found at 1:39 a.m. April 26 in a sport utility vehicle that
was hanging over the edge of a hillside, according to a police affidavit."

"Baker was incoherent and unable to pass three field sobriety tests but
there was no noticeable odor of alcohol on her breath, the affidavit says.
She told the officer she was on Paxil, an antidepressant."

_http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_634872.htm
l_
(http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_634872.html)

By _Brian Bowling
_ (mailto:bbowling@tribweb.com)
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, July 23, 2009

A Monroeville woman who died in a crash while driving the wrong way on the
Pennsylvania Turnpike was awaiting trial on two cases involving drugged
driving, according to court records.

Andrea Baker, 36, died Tuesday night after striking two east-bound
tractor-trailers near Monroeville as she drove her sport utility vehicle
west-bound, state police said.

Her son, Aiden Baker, 2, who was strapped into a child seat in the SUV,
escaped with a bruised left cheek, police said.

The Allegheny Medical Examiner’s Office ruled Baker’s death accidental and
concluded she died from blunt force trauma to the abdomen and legs.
Toxicology results will be available in three to four months, a medical examiner
said.

The truck drivers were not injured.

State police are still investigating why Baker was traveling in the wrong
direction. A toll ticket found in her vehicle shows that she may have
entered the turnpike at the Allegheny Valley interchange.

Court records show Baker was cited twice in the last year for driving in
the wrong lane. Other citations from police in Pittsburgh, Springdale, East
Deer, West Deer, Tarentum, North Versailles and Edgewood include careless
driving, reckless driving, running a stop sign and ignoring a traffic
control device.

Allegheny County Judge Jeffrey Manning had issued an arrest warrant for
Baker because she failed to appear July 15 for a hearing on drugged driving
charges filed in April by Monroeville police. Baker was found at 1:39 a.m.
April 26 in a sport utility vehicle that was hanging over the edge of a
hillside, according to a police affidavit.

Baker was incoherent and unable to pass three field sobriety tests but
there was no noticeable odor of alcohol on her breath, the affidavit says. She
told the officer she was on Paxil, an antidepressant.

Monroeville police charged Baker with drugged driving again on May 6 after
another motorist called because her sport utility vehicle was weaving.
Baker slurred her words and her eyes had a dazed look, but there was no odor
of alcohol, the police affidavit says. She failed three field sobriety tests.

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