ANTIDEPRESSANT & ALCOHOL: Suicide: British Judo Star Tipped for Olympics: UK

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

ANTIDEPRESSANTS CAUSE CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL!!!! [AM I SHOUTING? YES I AM SHOUTING!!! AND I HAVE BEEN SHOUTING THAT ANTIDEPRESSANTS CAUSE CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL FOR TWO DECADES!] LET ME REPEAT THAT: ANTIDEPRESSANTS CAUSE CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL!!!!!

Antidepressants cause this alcohol craving in several ways:

– by dropping the blood sugar
– by producing mania, one type of mania is known as “dipsomania” which is described as an “uncontrollable urge to drink alcohol”
– by increasing serotonin which has been shown in medical research to cause cravings for alcohol (see SSRIs & Alcoho at www.drugawareness.org)
________________________________

Paragraph four reads: “But an inquest heard he had secretly been battling depression after splitting with the mother of his daughter – and in the early hours of New Year’s Day he was found dead in his home in Mold, North Wales.”

Paragraph thirteen reads: “When their relationship broke down, he moved back into his family home where he began a course of anti-depressant drugs.”

Paragraph twenty reads: “Toxicology results showed he was more than three times the drink-drive limit. . . ”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1267219/Robert-Gallagher-UK-Olympic-judo-hopeful-hangs-black-belt.html

Monday, Apr 19 2010 3PM

British judo star tipped for Olympic glory hangs himself with own black belt after breaking up with girlfriend
By Daily Mail Reporter

Last updated at 1:39 PM on 19th April 2010

A British judo star tipped for success at the 2012 Olympics hanged himself with his own black belt after struggling to get over splitting from his girlfriend, an inquest heard.

Firefighter Robert ‘Robbie’ Gallagher, 23, was so talented in martial arts he was listed as one of the amateur sportsmen expected to shine during the London Olympics.

He was known across the Judo world for fighting in the 66kg weight category and was one of Britain’s top judo players in 2005, when he was in the British junior squad.

But an inquest heard he had secretly been battling depression after splitting with the mother of his daughter – and in the early hours of New Year’s Day he was found dead in his home in Mold, North Wales.

His father Robert Gallagher Snr, said: ‘We as a family are so saddened by Robbie’s untimely death and we miss him greatly.

‘He was into his judo and was a contender for the 2012 Olympic games and was a retained firefighter, hoping to have a future full-time in firefighting.

‘He had been a mischievous happy person and enjoyed his life. He wanted to achieve the very best.’

Mr Gallagher started judo when he was five before later taking up the sport at the highest level.

He was British judo champion three times and represented North Wales Fire and Rescue Service at the 2008 World Firefighting Games at the Echo Arena, Liverpool.

A British Judo Association spokeswoman said after his death: ‘British judo is extremely saddened by the loss of Robbie Gallagher.

‘A talented judo player, Robbie will be missed by players and coaches alike.’

An inquest heard last Friday how Robbie had been with girlfriend Sophie Bell-Halfpenny for four years, and together they shared a home and daughter Evie.

When their relationship broke down, he moved back into his family home where he began a course of anti-depressant drugs.

Miss Bell-Halfpenny told the hearing her former partner had threatened suicide on several occasions, explaining: ‘He once phoned me at 4am to say he had taken an overdose of sleeping tablets.

‘Then he came up to my house and and was waving his judo belts at me saying he was going to take his own life.’

The inquest in Mold heard how the judo ace had gone to a pub on New Year’s Eve to see in 2010 with some friends but had then gone back home to hang himself.

His father said he did not realise his son had returned home early until he went to have a cigarette outside shortly after midnight, and heard a noise from their garage.

He stepped inside and made the horrific discovery of his son hanging by his own judo belt.

A post-mortem examination revealed the father-of-one had died from asphyxia caused by hanging.

Toxicology results showed he was more than three times the drink-drive limit. He did not leave a note.

Recording a verdict of suicide, North East Wales coroner John Hughes, told the family: ‘I want to tell you how desperately sad I was to hear of your misfortune, especially as it was someone as young as your boy.’

After hearing of his death last January, a spokesman for his former school, Alun School, said: ‘We are very sad to hear this news.

‘He was a very outgoing character who was well liked by all the staff. He always had a big smile on his face.

‘We remember him fondly as a very fit lad, he could turn his hand to anything, but judo was his sport.

‘Robbie was one of the most gifted athletes we had at the school. He excelled at judo and represented Wales and the UK.

‘He was an excellent judo player and at one time he was in the top group for his age.’

 2,039 total views

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Found Not Guilty of Killing Wife While Asleep: England

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read:  “Swansea Crown Court heard
Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the
couple, who slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical experts said the sudden withdrawal of
the drugs could have led to him having very vivid dreams.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/briton-who-strangled-wife-in-his-sleep-walks-free/article1371102/

Briton who strangled wife in his sleep walks free

Prosecution accepts argument that Brian Thomas, 59, suffered sleep
disorder and had no control over his body during attack.

London ­
Reuters Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 9:21AM EST Last updated on Friday,
Nov. 20, 2009 1:50PM EST

A Briton who strangled his wife during a
nightmare because he believed he was attacking an intruder, walked free from
court on Friday after prosecutors withdrew their case against him.

Brian
Thomas, 59, of Neath in South Wales, killed his wife Christine, 57, while they
were on holiday in July last year.

Prosecutors had accepted that Thomas
had a sleep disorder and so had no control over his body when he attacked his

wife of 40 years while they were both asleep.

“I must emphasize that the
circumstances of this case are almost unique in the UK and there have been fewer
than 50 instances recorded worldwide,” said Iwan Jenkins, Chief Crown Prosecutor
for Dyfed Powys.

Mr. Thomas admitted being responsible but instead of

charging him with murder or manslaughter, prosecutors had sought a special
verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity, the Press Association reported.

“The consequences of such a finding would have meant Mr. Thomas’s
detention in a psychiatric hospital, but it is now clear that the psychiatrists
feel that that would serve no useful purpose,” Mr. Jenkins said.

Swansea
Crown Court heard Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the couple, who
slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical
experts said the sudden withdrawal of the drugs could have led to him having
very vivid dreams.

The court was told the couple had been asleep in
their camper van in a pub car park when they were disturbed by youths in cars
performing wheel spins and so moved elsewhere.

However, Mr. Thomas then
had a dream one of the youths had broken into the van and later woke to find
himself next to his wife‘s body, at which point he called the police.

High Court Judge Justice Davis told Mr. Thomas, who had been in custody
since January, that in the eyes of the law he bore no responsibility for what he
had done and said he was a “decent man and devoted husband”.

Mr.
Thomas’s brother Raymond Thomas said the death and court case had been very
distressing.

“They were a loving couple and always like that together,”
he said. “He has always been a loving husband and a family man. This was a
tragic, tragic episode and we are all very emotional.”

 1,559 total views

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Man Found Not Guilty of Killing Wife While Asleep

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read:  “Swansea Crown Court heard
Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the
couple, who slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical experts said the sudden withdrawal of

the drugs could have led to him having very vivid dreams.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/briton-who-strangled-wife-in-his-sleep-walks-free/article1371102/

Briton who strangled wife in his sleep walks free

Prosecution accepts argument that Brian Thomas, 59, suffered sleep
disorder and had no control over his body during attack.

London ­
Reuters Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 9:21AM EST Last updated on Friday,
Nov. 20, 2009 1:50PM EST

A Briton who strangled his wife during a
nightmare because he believed he was attacking an intruder, walked free from
court on Friday after prosecutors withdrew their case against him.

Brian
Thomas, 59, of Neath in South Wales, killed his wife Christine, 57, while they
were on holiday in July last year.

Prosecutors had accepted that Thomas
had a sleep disorder and so had no control over his body when he attacked his

wife of 40 years while they were both asleep.

“I must emphasize that the
circumstances of this case are almost unique in the UK and there have been fewer
than 50 instances recorded worldwide,” said Iwan Jenkins, Chief Crown Prosecutor
for Dyfed Powys.

Mr. Thomas admitted being responsible but instead of

charging him with murder or manslaughter, prosecutors had sought a special
verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity, the Press Association reported.

“The consequences of such a finding would have meant Mr. Thomas’s
detention in a psychiatric hospital, but it is now clear that the psychiatrists
feel that that would serve no useful purpose,” Mr. Jenkins said.

Swansea
Crown Court heard Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the couple, who
slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical
experts said the sudden withdrawal of the drugs could have led to him having
very vivid dreams.

The court was told the couple had been asleep in
their camper van in a pub car park when they were disturbed by youths in cars
performing wheel spins and so moved elsewhere.

However, Mr. Thomas then
had a dream one of the youths had broken into the van and later woke to find
himself next to his wife‘s body, at which point he called the police.

High Court Judge Justice Davis told Mr. Thomas, who had been in custody
since January, that in the eyes of the law he bore no responsibility for what he
had done and said he was a “decent man and devoted husband”.

Mr.
Thomas’s brother Raymond Thomas said the death and court case had been very
distressing.

“They were a loving couple and always like that together,”
he said. “He has always been a loving husband and a family man. This was a
tragic, tragic episode and we are all very emotional.”

 2,059 total views

CYMBALTA & DESYREL: Murder: Man Kills Gas Station Attendant: MA

Paragraph one reads: “Steven Foster, the man accused of the brutal slaying of gas station attendant Hegazy Sayed, had prescriptions for at least two anti-depressant drugs leading up to Sunday night’s shooting.”

Paragraph four reads: “Aviles, who helps out in the rental/ management office of Bristol Lodging Sober House ­ a 15-unit rooming house at 68 Broadway where Foster had been living alone ­ was able to identify two of the meds as Cymbalta and Trazodone.”

“Both drugs are anti-depressants.”

http://www.tauntongazette.com/homepage/x1914256178/Murder-suspect-had-Rx-meds

Murder suspect had Rx meds
By Charles Winokoor, Staff Writer
GateHouse News Service
Posted Oct 31, 2009 @ 12:06 AM
Taunton ­

Steven Foster, the man accused of the brutal slaying of gas station attendant Hegazy Sayed, had prescriptions for at least two anti-depressant drugs leading up to Sunday night’s shooting.

Marlene Aviles said that when she cleaned out the single-room, efficiency apartment that Foster had rented the three weeks prior to the execution-style killing, she retrieved “six or seven” containers left on top of the refrigerator ­ all of them bearing Foster’s name and all nearly full of prescription pills.

Aviles, who helps out in the rental/ management office of Bristol Lodging Sober House ­ a 15-unit rooming house at 68 Broadway where Foster had been living alone ­ was able to identify two of the meds as Cymbalta and Trazodone.

Both drugs are anti-depressants.

Trazodone, in particular, is also used for sleeplessness and chronic pain.

Aviles also said that Foster had mentioned to her that he suffered from Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that affects the feet and legs and sometimes the arms and upper body.

A woman answering the front door Thursday at the Dighton house where Foster’s ex-girlfriend and young son reportedly both live refused to identify herself ­ but she did confirm that Foster had been prescribed anti-depressants and that he suffers from Guillain-Barré syndrome.

According to Taunton District Court records, an abuse protection order request on behalf of Christine Lima of Dighton was formally filed against Foster on Oct. 26, the day after the shooting ­ and also the day that he was charged with murder, armed robbery, intimidating a witness and possession of an illegal firearm, the latter of which police say was a stolen .22-caliber rifle.

The 10 p.m. shooting of Sayed, a 45-year-old Egyptian immigrant who is survived by a wife in Taunton and four children in Egypt, was especially abhorrent to many people for its sudden brutality.

Authorities allege that Foster, instead of walking into the gas station office and demanding money, pre-emptively opened fire through a glass door hitting Sayed once in the head.

He next walked in, pumped a second bullet into Sayed’s head while he lay on the floor and made off with $15, according to the Bristol County DA’s office.

Less than five minutes later Foster allegedly was captured on surveillance footage walking barefoot into a nearby CVS store and then exiting with a pair of slippers.

Authorities say he lost his shoes after the shooting when he ran into some woods to change his clothes.

Foster’s Guillain-Barré syndrome, which besides producing weakness and tingling in the feet and legs can in some cases leads to paralysis, could have contributed to a state of depression, said Dr. Harvey Reback, a Fall River-based internal medicine physician.

Reback, who likened the advanced effects of the disorder to those of polio, said that someone with an existing psychotic diagnosis, who feels better after taking an anti-depressant and then stops, can be courting disaster.

Upon hearing some of the details of the Sayed shooting case, Reback immediately drew an analogy to the brutal stabbing attack earlier this week on a female psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

“It’s my gut feeling that he may not have been taking his medicine,” he said of the MGH assault.

In the Boston incident the attacker was shot to death by an off-duty guard, but not before grievously injuring his vicitm.

“If someone is crazy to begin with and they’re not taking their medicine, they can go off the deep end,” Reback said.

Bristol County District Attorney’s Office spokesman Gregg Miliote, when asked to comment on the possibility that Foster was off his meds the night of the shooting, said that he had no information pertaining to the defendant’s use of prescription pills.

“I’m not aware of any mental health issues,” Miliote said.

Foster, who is being held without bail, is scheduled to appear for a probable cause hearing on Nov. 20.

Miliote said that although the DA’s office has a strong case, it could take as long as two years before the trial gets underway, not unusual when it comes to trials that can lead to very lengthy sentences.

“Look at the Elizabeth Smart case, they just started the trial,” he said, referring to the 14-year Utah girl who in 2002 was kidnapped by a husband and wife, and then allegedly raped repeatedly by her male captor until being rescued nine months later.

 1,387 total views

PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

 1,802 total views

PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

 1,304 total views

Zyban (Wellbutrin) “No Way”

“I think at this point the only thing that will save us is knowing about any medications before we take them.”

 

My husband’s horror story about Prozac and other SSRI anti depressants is posted in your web site– The Macula’s Story. We have been lucky because my husband is still alive. But we have been through a living hell, because our Primary Care Physician prescribed Prozac for my husband because he was a little down after our house burned. Who wouldn’t be?

Well last week I took my 17 year old son to our primary care physician for nasal congestion and a cough. While we were there I complained to our new Primary Care Physician, who we have been using for about 2 years now, that my son was smoking a pack of cigarettes daily. And that this was ridiculous at his age. The Doctor asked him why he was smoking and my son said, “school and work stress”. So The Doctor said to him, “I have something that will take the edge off the stress and the need to smoke”. Well I looked at the doctor and asked, “what that might be”. He said, “a new drug Zyban (Wellbutrin)”. I almost fell off the stool I was sitting on. This Doctor knew all about the adverse reaction that my husband had to Prozac and other SSRI anti-depressant drugs. We have explained it to him many times over the past 2 years.

I said, ” You forget I am the person who almost lost her husband to Prozac adverse reaction 2 years earlier, I couldn’t believe he wanted to prescribe this anti-depressant to my son. Knowing full well what had happened to my husband on anti-depressants”. He got somewhat defensive at this point and said, “this is not an SSRI anti-depressant like the others. This doesn’t work on the serotonin levels in the brain, this one works on the brain chemical dopamine”. I said, “after the hell we went through with my husband, my son will not take any medication that would alter any of his brain chemicals”.

Then I just told him, “no”. “There was no way my son was going on Zyban (Wellbutrin). I would not take the chance”. He then looked at my son, who will be 18 years old in 6 months. He laughingly told him, “come back to see me in 6 months”. I was very upset by this point. I felt like he was saying come back in 6 months so I can legally drug you without your mothers permission. Does he not think that my children went through hell also. Watching their father turn into a manic depressive, psychotic, suicidal wreck from a completely normal human being. Prozac and other anti-depressants took away their father for 1 12 years of their lives. Through my research and my finding Dr. Tracy, we helped him return to his normal self. But not without the pain and trauma it has caused all of us.

I have explained to this man over and over the hell and the trauma my husband and I and our children went through. Because some Doctor prescribed Prozac for a very stupid reason. Now I keep thinking, “I need to change Doctors”. But then I think “why”. They are all the same. They prescribe these drugs that they know nothing about. Have any of them stopped to read the adverse reactions or side effects these and any drugs can cause on the insert that come with the drugs. No, all they know is what the pharmaceutical salesperson tells them. And we know that the pharmaceutical sales person is not going to bad mouth their own medications. I think at this point the only thing that will save us is knowing about any medications before we take them. Know the adverse reactions and side effect they can cause. If you or someone you know has personality changes or things that seem different about them while on a medication, research it.

With my husband it took 1 1/2 years to realize what was going on, because we saw 5 or 6 different Doctors. I showed them the research I had done and what these drugs can do and I thought this was the cause of what he was going through. And they all said, “Prozac and these other SSRI drugs don’t do that”. Well my husband is living proof that they do. He didn’t get better until we took matters into our own hands and pulled him off all the medications they had him on. And about three weeks latter my husbands old personality started returning. But it took another 7 to 8 months for him to get to about 85% of his old self. He is still not 100% and we wonder if he ever will be. It is very frightening just going to the Doctors for my family and friends who saw what we went through anymore.

Patty Macula

 

1995

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 94.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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