SEROQUEL: Man accused of drugging, raping Orem woman – UT

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): ALWAYS KEEP IN
MIND THAT THERE IS LITTLE DIFFERENCE IN THESE ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS AND SNRI
ANTIDEPRESSANTS. THEY ARE VERY POWERFUL SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS INHIBITING
MULTIPLE SEROTONIN RECEPTORS!!! AND ON TOP OF THAT ARE SEROTONIN AGONISTS
AS WELL.

Police say the drug Christensen gave to the victim was a 300 mg
Seroquel, a medication for which he has prescription. The drug is
given to bipolar disorder and is an antipsychotic
medication.

Police say one of the side effects of the drug is
impaired thinking and reactions, and that people should also avoid alcohol
when taking it.

Man accused of drugging, raping Orem woman

Last Update:
2/18 3:20 pm

OREM, Utah (ABC 4 News) – Police say a Utah
County man drugged a woman he met at a bar and raped her.

Police say on
Friday February 12, Orem officers responded to a report of a rape that
had been reported from the night before.

Police say the victim
is a 24-year-old woman from southwest Orem.

According to
police, the victim met 26-year-old Jason Christensen at a bar in
Provo.

Police say both the suspect and alleged victim had been
drinking and went back to her apartment when Christensen gave her a pill to help
her sleep.

After taking the pill, police say the only thing the
victim remembered was waking up for a moment while the
suspect was sexually assaulting her.

After that, police say the
victim doesn’t remember anything for several hours until she woke up and
was undressed.

According to police, Christensen gave the victim the
pill at about 3:00 a.m. on the 11th and she didn’t wake up until 11:00 a.m. the
same day.

Police say the drug Christensen gave to the victim was a
300 mg Seroquel, a medication for which he has prescription.
The drug is given to bipolar disorder and is an
antipsychotic medication.

Police say one of the side effects

of the drug is impaired thinking and reactions, and that people should also
avoid alcohol when taking it.

Detectives caught up with Jason on
Wednesday at the City Center Motel in Provo where he was staying. He was
arrested and charged with Rape and Distribution of a
Prescription.

—-Information from: Orem
Police

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JAMA: Mild to severe depression better treated with alternatives to medications

Last month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients
with very severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild
to severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


From: nandtbearden@yahoo.com
To: ,
ssri-crusaders@yahoogroups.com, atypical_antipsychotics@yahoogroups.com,
atracyphd2@aol.com
Sent: 2/14/2010 8:12:09 A.M. Central Standard
Time
Subj: Even when treated, depression costs employers

http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/mobile/m/FullArticle/eUK/CHLTUK/nhealthNews_uUKTRE6183DO20100209

Even
when treated, depression costs employers
Tue, 09 Feb 20:05 PM
GMT

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Workers with depression stay home
sick more often than healthy colleagues, even when their disease is treated,
according to a Thomson Reuters report released on Tuesday.

The report,
commissioned by drug maker Sanofi Aventis, suggests that employers would
benefit from better treatments of their workers for depression. Depression is
the leading cause of disability among Americans aged 15 to 44, according to
the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Even when depressed patients
are treated with antidepressants, there are substantial productivity losses.
Therapies that can better manage depression may provide opportunities for
savings to employers,” the Thomson Reuters research team wrote in the Journal
of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Despite the widely
acknowledged effectiveness of antidepressant therapy, productivity costs
related to depression persist even after patients receive treatment,” Suellen
Curkendall, director of outcomes research at Thomson Reuters, said in a
statement.

“This may be due to the fact that patients often don’t
respond to the first type of antidepressant that they are prescribed. They
also may fail to take their medications on a regular basis,” added Curkendall,
who led the study.

Curkendall and colleagues analyzed insurance claims
and employee health and productivity data for more than 22,000 patients
treated with antidepressants and compared them to people without
depression.

Workers who had been treated for depression were twice as
likely as others to use short-term disability leave, they found.
Disability-related costs for a year, on average, were $1,038 for patients
treated for depression and $325 for the non-depressed workers.

“Over 40
percent of patients with depression were diagnosed with at least one of the
other included psychiatric conditions besides depression,” the researchers at
Thomson Reuters, parent company of Reuters, added.

Most common were
anxiety, dissociative and so-called somatoform disorders — a group of
disorders with physical symptoms but no apparent physical cause.

Last
month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients with very
severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild to
severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

At least 27 million Americans take antidepressants and
more than 164 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written in 2008,
totaling nearly $10 billion in U.S. sales and $20 billion globally, according
to IMS Health.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox, editing by Jackie
Frank)
Sent via BlackBerry by
AT&T

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CYMBALTA & DESIPRAMINE: Death Threats Made Against Judge: GA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): WHEN are these judges going to learn that when they court order these guys into these so called “substance abuse programs” that all they do is put them on antidepressants or atypical antipsychotics that are more dangerous than the illegal drugs they have been on?!!! Maybe when enough of the judges get death threats from the fellows they are doing this to they will finally begin to realize they have made the wrong treatment choice???

Paragraphs 11 through 14 read: “The defense’s first witness, Delaney, said Koldewey’s destructive state of mind was chemically induced.”

He testified that just days before making the threats, Koldeway was prescribed a sleep medication that interfered with other medications he had been taking.

The drug, desipramine [an older tricyclic antidepressant], can cause sudden hostility, panic attacks and aggressiveness when taken in combination with cymbalta, which Koldeway was also using, said Delaney.

“When you use these drugs together, you’ve just got to be careful,” said Delaney. “Patients should be monitored for reactions on a day-to- day basis.”

http://www.jacksonville.com/news/georgia/2009-09-01/story/death_threats_on_brunswick_judge_blamed_on_faulty_drug_mix

Death threats on Brunswick judge blamed on faulty drug mix

The man accused of threatening a judge had a medication interaction, pharmacologist said.

By Carole Hawkins
Story updated at 8:24 AM on Wednesday, Sep. 2, 2009
BRUNSWICK, Ga. A Brunswick man accused of making death threats against a judge was suffering from a toxic prescription drug interaction, a pharmacologist testified Tuesday.

Tallahassee pharmacologist Marland Delaney Jr. said Matthew Koldewey was being treated with a “laundry list” of drugs when he threatened to kill Chief Judge Amanda Williams and halfway house director Chad Waters.

In January 2008, Koldewey threatened to take Williams out with a rifle and also twist her neck with his hands, according to language in the indictment filed against him. Williams had ordered Koldewey into a substance abuse program in lieu of jail.

Koldewey made the threats during a counseling session with Dale Tushman, a counselor at Gateway Behavioral Health Services who was treating him.

He also said he wanted to slit Waters’ throat and burn down Alpha House, where Koldewey was living while in treatment.

Assistant District Attorney David Peterson said the specific nature of the threats suggested Koldewey was serious.

Waters, who runs Alpha House, testified Tuesday that he took safety precautions in response to Koldewey’s threat. His boss placed a restraining order against Koldewey, and Waters spoke to his family and other men at Alpha House about the threat.

Waters also said the threat came unexpectedly.

“I was shocked,” he said when asked his reaction. “[Koldewey] had never said an unkind word to me before.”

Defense attorney Robert Crowe said Koldewey’s threats were angry thoughts said in confidence to a counselor to whom he had gone for treatment.

The defense’s first witness, Delaney, said Koldewey’s destructive state of mind was chemically induced.

He testified that just days before making the threats, Koldeway was prescribed a sleep medication that interfered with other medications he had been taking.

The drug, desipramine, can cause sudden hostility, panic attacks and aggressiveness when taken in combination with cymbalta, which Koldeway was also using, said Delaney.

“When you use these drugs together, you’ve just got to be careful,” said Delaney. “Patients should be monitored for reactions on a day-to- day basis.”

Delaney criticized the drug regimen Koldewey undertook from the time he had been jailed as “very high higher than most full-blown psychotics are given.”

He said the symptoms were a “warning bell” that drug levels in Koldewey’s body had reached toxic levels.

After the incident, Koldewey was sent to Georgia Regional Medical Hospital, where a doctor took him off desipramine.

“Three days later, he was better,” Delaney said. “They turned off the faucet.”

Koldewey is charged with two types of terroristic threats. One for threats against Chad Waters and Williams as individuals, which carries a sentence of one to five years in prison and up to $5,000 in fines. The second, for making threats in retaliation against a judge, which carries a sentence of five to 10 years and up to $50,000 in fines.

The trial is expected to begin Thursday.

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