ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Two Brothers Commit Suicide One Week Apart: Arkansas

Paragraphs eight and nine read:  ”  ‘One guy last
year locked himself inside a bathroom and shot himself, and this was a
retired military man that was highly decorated
, Bearden said. “Then
come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the week before in
another state.”

“The correlation between the two brothers was

anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm
that the prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden
said it happens too often that prescription drugs change
the mindset of a person.”

Paragraph four reads:  “Bearden
added,  ‘People need to know that we do, in fact, have a problem in Saline
County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here anymore. Every once in
awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
drugs’.”

http://www.bentoncourier.com/content/view/204346/1/

Coroner: Teen Drug Death Rate High

Saturday, 06
February 2010

The hand reaches down as another parent
enters the room fearing the worst. The large black bag slowly unzips and the
worst fear a parent never wants to believe, that moment is here. Inside the
darkness of the body bag lies someone’s son, daughter, nephew, their niece ­
someone’s good friend, and another family is torn apart with grief, confusion,
and a wish it was them instead.

It is a day that
Will Bearden has seen too often in his 13 years as the Saline County Corner, and
18 years previously riding on an ambulance as an EMT. Nearly everyday Bearden
has to tell yet another family what caused the death of a loved one, and
surprising to many, he said nearly 90 percent are due to drugs and
alcohol.


In fact, in 2009 alone, Bearden said that about 60 deaths were related
to drugs and alcohol, and nearly 30 of those deaths involved teenagers living in
Saline County, and state officials say the county leads the state in the number
of fatal drug overdoses.

“When you say it won’t happen to me or my family,
you are about to eat your words, because I have seen it happen time and time
again,” Bearden said. “I work in it every day, and I see a lot of sad families
asking what they could have done to help their son or daughter.”
Bearden added, “People need to know that we do, in fact,
have a problem in Saline County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here
anymore. Every once in awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street
drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
drugs.”
Bearden said even Arkansas Chief Medical Examiner
Charles Kokes believes “Saline County has one of the highest percentages of
deaths caused by drug overdoses.”
But it isn’t just teens that are dying from prescription
drugs or alcohol; everyone is at risk, he said. From fatality accidents to
accidental overdoses to suicides, people “age 85 and down” have deaths related
to the rise in prescription drug abuse.
One guy last year locked himself inside a bathroom and
shot himself, and this was a retired military man that was highly decorated,”
Bearden said. “Then come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the
week before in another state.”
The correlation between the two brothers was
anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm that the
prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden said it
happens too often that prescription drugs change the mindset of a
person.
“Drugs definitely affect a person’s mental state,” he
said. “I also believe that it’s a mental disease when someone gets hooked on
drugs. Many people addicted believe they have pain (whether physical, mental or
emotional) and they take medications for their pain. Some aren’t trying to do
harm; they just take too much and then some just go and take their lives, and
probably wouldn’t have if they wouldn’t have had so much medication affecting
their mental state.”
Bearden said of the nearly 60 deaths in Saline County
last year, around 22 were ruled suicides. After the bodies are sent to the
Arkansas State Crime Lab for toxicology screens, most come back with some type
of drugs in their system, the majority being prescription drugs.
“I’ve had to help out with a lot of those autopsies
because the medical examiner is overloaded with cases all the time, and I’ve
seen where pills aren’t even digested in the stomach yet and sometimes are still
in a person’s mouth,” Beard said. “What makes this job tough is when you have to
approach the loved ones of those that died. I’ve seen a lot of divorces and
hatred with families after a son or daughter’s death because the parents keep
blaming each other … it’s just a real sad thing to see, and I see it too
often.”
Bearden also recalls many trips to the Saline Memorial
Hospital in which a person survived an overdose. But it isn’t in any way
pleasant for anyone, he said.
“Three or four times a night I bet someone overdoses on
drugs, but survives from having their stomachs pumped and they fight with the
doctors and nurses,” Bearden said. “It’s got to be a unbelievable pain to have a
stomach pumped, but they shouldn’t have put themselves in that situation if they
didn’t want that to happen and the medical staff has to do whatever they can to
save their life.”
Then there is the criminal side of people hooked on
drugs. Once, Bearden said he left the home of an older person that had just
died  and later returned to the home to retrieve medications to help with
the death investigation.
“It wasn’t even 30 minutes later that I returned to the
home,” he said. “I found the back door kicked in and inside were two teenagers
going through the medicine cabinets. They were ambulance-listening and chasing
in hopes of finding prescription drugs.”
Bearden said police and others are now even warning
families to not list the addresses of the deceased. He said the prescription
drug abusers do everything from listen to police/fire/ambulance scanners, to
chasing ambulances to even reading obituaries in newspapers.
“It has unfortunately come to that point,” Bearden said.
“Don’t tell people where the family is because they’ll break in and look for
whatever (prescription) drugs they can find.”
However, Bearden believes this can be overcome. He said
people first need to listen and believe there is a problem and then work
together to find solutions.
“We’ve got to get the message to the younger kids and we
can do that by getting the parents and grandparents involved in teaching them
and making them realize that it can happen to them,” Bearden said. “I think we
need more programs in school to recognize and talk about this problem. And the
younger the children we can reach, the better we can be in helping it all end.
But really the best way is by word of mouth.”

One program Bearden said he is
“100 percent behind” is the Operation Medicine Cabinet. (See related
article.)

Most importantly, Bearden said people have to truly
believe there is a problem with prescription drug abuse in Saline County.

Unzipping another body bag and
having to tell parents that their child is gone is a part of the job Bearden
wishes he never has to do again, but it happens ­ much too often.

“ … It will send chills up
your spine,” he said. “ … Letting parents in to identify the body … that’s
real stuff, and I want to change that. If we can all work together, we can end
it.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: 27 Year Old Attempts to Commit “Suicide-By-Co…

Paragraphs 19 & 20 read:  “Since being released from

prison, Tokarev had been “suffering with major depression,” Good

said. She said he had been taking antidepressants and anti-anxiety

medication in prison but was unable to find medical assistance upon his release.

“She said he told her, “Olesya, I feel sick. My body feels

so sick, and my brain feels like it’s hurting.”

http://www.twincities.com/ci_13922340

He left a note, stole a truck and fled into a hail of

bullets

Sister says ex-con brother was suicidal and hoping

the police would kill him

By

Nick Ferraro

nferraro@pioneerpress.com

Updated: 12/03/2009 11:34:01

PM CST

The sister of the man wounded by police Wednesday night in

downtown Hastings said she believes he was trying to commitsuicide by cop.

“I’m going all the way out. Once they pull me over or anything I’m

shooting them until I run out of bullets,” Roman Tokarev wrote in a note his

sister Olesya Good’s husband found Wednesday before she alerted police.

Hours later, officers shot Tokarev, 27, after he allegedly pointed a gun

at them and tried to ram their squad cars during a chase.

“After

thinking about everything and seeing everything that happened, I think he was

trying to make the police shoot him to death … kind of commit his own suicide

by them shooting him,” Good, 29, said.

Tokarev, who emigrated from

Estonia with his family in 1996, was hospitalized in critical condition Thursday

after surgery to remove a bullet lodged near his heart, his sister said.

“The way it sounds, he was shot six to eight times,” she said, adding he

was hit twice in the arm and twice in the leg. “His left hand is totally

paralyzed.”

Tokarev had been living at his sister’s home in Elk River

and under intensive supervised release ­ reserved for high-risk offenders

­ through the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

He was released

from the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Stillwater on May 4 after serving time

for a 2005 aggravated robbery conviction in Hennepin County.

Good called

police after her husband found the note at their house about 1 p.m. and

discovered Tokarev had taken the family’s pickup truck.

“We asked them

to help us find him and save his life,” she said.

Within hours, a

warrant was issued for Tokarev’s arrest, according to the Bureau of Criminal

Apprehension.

Authorities were told that Tokarev, who also has

convictions for assault and vehicle theft, could be armed and had threatened

officers in the note, BCA spokesman Andy Skoogman said.

Tokarev was

spotted about 8 p.m. in Hastings, and federal, state, city and Dakota County

officers tried to stop him by boxing in the stolen pickup with their vehicles

near the intersection of Minnesota 55 and U.S. 61, the BCA said.

Tokarev

rammed the squad cars and pointed a gun at officers, Skoogman said.

Shots were fired, and Tokarev drove off, leading a chase through several

residential blocks. At U.S. 61 and Fourth Street, officers finally stopped the

truck. More shots were fired, and Tokarev was struck several times, authorities

said.

Investigators found a weapon in the vehicle, Skoogman said.

Good and Skoogman said it’s unclear why Tokarev went to Hastings.

The three officers who fired the shots have been placed on paid

administrative leave, a standard procedure after a police shooting.

Since being released from prison, Tokarev had been “suffering with major

depression,” Good said. She said he had been taking antidepressants and

anti-anxiety medication in prison but was unable to find medical assistance upon

his release.

She said he told her, “Olesya, I feel sick. My body feels

so sick, and my brain feels like it’s hurting.”

In his note, Tokarev

wrote that he “lost it” after a weekend visit with his parole officer.

“Apparently when (the parole officer) was over here, some things were

said or something that kind of triggered everything,” Good said.

Shari

Burt, communications director for the Department of Corrections, confirmed that

Tokarev was seen by a supervision agent Sunday, but, citing the investigation,

would not respond to Good’s claim.

Burt said Tokarev was on house arrest

but had earned his way off electronic monitoring by obtaining and maintaining

employment.

Tokarev apologized in the note to his family “for all I’ve

done” and wrote, “I will not be back. It’s my time to go. Please kiss everyone

for me. … I will remember you all until eternity.”

Good said he ended

the note by writing, “I got a gun on me that I purchased and I’m not going back

to prison. I love you all. I love you all. I love you all.”

Nick Ferraro

can be reached at 651-228-2173.

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CYMBALTA: Five Patients Commit Suicide During Clinical Trials: U.S.A.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
So even though 19 year old bible college student, Tracy Johnson’s, suicide was the only one we heard about happening in the clinical trials with Cymbalta (taking place within Lilly’s own laboratory in a “healthy volunteer”), there were apparently FOUR MORE SUICIDES in the clinical trials?!!
Paragraphs five &  six read: “While people say many of Cymbalta’s side effects are manageable, some users experience effects that are extremely frightening and potentially dangerous. Some patients found the drug tends to trigger heart palpitations and increase anxiety levels and elevate the severity suicidal thoughts or impulses.”

“A 19-year-old college student who had shown no outward signs of depression killed herself at an Eli Lilly & Company laboratory in Indianapolis where she had been participating in a company drug trial for the experimental antidepressant. Four other patients who were given the drug during earlier trials also committed suicide.”

ADDITIONAL COMMENT BY Ann Blake-Tracy: HOW LONG ARE THEY GOING TO BEAT THIS RIDICULOUS HYPOTHESIS TO DEATH WHEN THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO EVIDENCE, NOR HAS THERE EVER BEEN, THAT THE SSRI ANTIDEPRESSANTS DO THIS AND MOST ESPECIALLY THERE IS NO EVIDENCE THAT THEY “RESTORE BALANCE TO THE EMOTIONS”??????!!!!!!

I QUOTE ONCE AGAIN THE NEVER ENDING SEROTONIN LIE: “The drug works by preventing serotonin and noradrenaline from being reabsorbed back into the nerve cells in the brain. This helps prolong the mood-lightening effect of any released serotonin and noradrenaline, restoring balance to the emotions of the patient.”

http://www.emaxhealth.com/1357/25/33042/cymbalta-side-effects.html

Submitted by Tyler Woods Ph.D. on Aug 22nd, 2009
Posted under:

Cymbalta, generic name Duloxetine Hydrochloride, has certain side effects consumers should be aware of.

Cymbalta manufactured by Eli Lilly is a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressant used to treat major depression. It is prescribed to treat pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which is a painful nerve disorder associated with diabetes that affects the hands, legs, and feet. Cymbalta has only recently been approved for use to treat fibromyalgia if people can tolerate Cymbalta’s side effects.

The drug works by preventing serotonin and noradrenaline from being reabsorbed back into the nerve cells in the brain. This helps prolong the mood-lightening effect of any released serotonin and noradrenaline, restoring balance to the emotions of the patient. Cymbalta may also be used in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

Among the more common Cymbalta side effects that users complain about is being fatigued even after a good night’s sleep. Blurred vision, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, and issues with both constipation and diarrhea, agitation, irritability, increased, hostility, high blood pressure, decreased libido, hot flashes, fatigue, rash, and increased sweating have also been reported.

While people say many of Cymbalta’s side effects are manageable, some users experience effects that are extremely frightening and potentially dangerous. Some patients found the drug tends to trigger heart palpitations and increase anxiety levels and elevate the severity suicidal thoughts or impulses.

A 19-year-old college student who had shown no outward signs of depression killed herself at an Eli Lilly & Company laboratory in Indianapolis where she had been participating in a company drug trial for the experimental antidepressant. Four other patients who were given the drug during earlier trials also committed suicide.

Anyone taking Cymbalta should understand that they can be at risk while driving, handling machines, or performing other hazardous activities such as working on tall ladders as it can cause dizziness or drowsiness.

Many people report that there were no Cymbalta side effects except for a lowered sexual drive and feel the drug gave them back their life. Like other antidepressants, Cymbalta should not be stopped suddenly if you have been on it for some time. Your brain receptors will adjust to it, and suddenly stopping can cause crying jags, agitation, dizziness, nausea, or headache. You should always talk with your doctor or healthcare provider to work out a plan to slowly decrease your medication to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

People are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit

www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

References
New York Times
Drugs.com
Source:
Tyler Woods Ph.D.

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