ANTIDEPRESSANT: Girl (11) From Bedwetting to Agitation & Psychotic Break

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

What a TRAGIC case and all too common! It compares with the
case of the 15 year old girl given Zoloft for warts – yes warts – and ended up
committing suicide. Of course Pfizer tried as hard as they could, albeit
unsuccessfully, to convince the court in her wrongful death suit that it
was the warts that drove her to suicide, not the Zoloft! And this case is also
very similar to the case of the little girl I discuss in my book, “Prozac:
Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” who was given Prozac because as
an A student it was felt she spent too much time doing homework! (I thought that
was how you became an A student!) She was described before the meds as an
excellent student and well behaved child.  Yet, within days on
Prozac she was throwing herself downstairs. They then took her off the meds
and then put her back on the meds at higher doses and the Yale
study ends with her pulling her hair out and being locked in a psych
ward where she would jump up and down on her Teddy Bear screaming “Kill, kill!
Die, Die!” As I have asked for years, how many productive and caring lives have
we cut off from us all by these deadly drugs?!
Paragraph three reads:  “He also includes the stories of
individual patients, all of whom fared poorly on psychiatric medications and did
better after coming off them. One was of a young woman from Seattle
prescribed an antidepressant at age 11 to treat her bed-wetting, who then became
agitated and spiraled into full-blown psychosis.
When Whitaker met her
at age 21 she was living in a group home for the severely mentally ill, mute,
and withdrawn. Her story is heartbreaking, and the implication is that her
deterioration was triggered by the medications she was given.”

http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2010/04/14/tying_the_rise_in_mental_illness_to_drugs_used_in_its_treatment/

Tying the rise in mental illness to drugs used in its treatment

By Dennis
Rosen

April 14, 2010

ANATOMY OF AN EPIDEMIC: Magic Bullets,
Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America
By
Robert Whitaker

Crown, 416 pp., $26

In “Anatomy of an Epidemic’’
Whitaker presents his theory that the dramatic increase in mental illness in the
United States since World War II is the direct result of the medicines
psychiatrists have been prescribing to treat it, and that this itself stems from

an unholy alliance between the pharmaceutical industry and corrupt physicians.
However, although extensively researched and drawing upon hundreds of sources,
the gaps in his theory remain too large for him to succeed in making a
convincing argument.

Whitaker cites studies showing better outcomes for
patients with depression or schizophrenia who have come off their medications
than for those who have stayed on them, but doesn’t consider the possibility
that this may be because those with milder disease recovered and no longer
needed medications, while those who were sicker to begin with simply could not
do without them.

He also includes the stories of individual patients, all
of whom fared poorly on psychiatric medications and did better after coming off
them. One was of a young woman from Seattle prescribed an antidepressant at age
11 to treat her bed-wetting, who then became agitated and spiraled into
full-blown psychosis. When Whitaker met her at age 21 she was living in a group
home for the severely mentally ill, mute, and withdrawn. Her story is
heartbreaking, and the implication is that her deterioration was triggered by
the medications she was given.

But how can one be certain of this?
Perhaps she was destined for mental illness through a combination of her genes
and the environment in the same way that some children develop cancer,
irrespective of any medications they may be taking. Perhaps without the
medications given to treat her psychosis her course would have been even worse.
Many children are treated with tricyclics for bed-wetting and the vast majority
do fine. A single case does not prove the rule, and here lies the basic problem
of this book. As Whitaker himself points out, there simply are not enough data

from well-designed, trustworthy studies. And without this information, it is
impossible to conclude anything meaningful about cause and effect.

Though
there remain unanswered questions about the efficacy of some psychiatric
medications in some patients and their long-term consequences, there is no
denying that they have brought about a huge improvement in quality of life for
millions. While it is reasonable for Whitaker to raise his concerns, it is
critical to remember that hypothesis is no substitute for data.

Ignoring
this can lead to disastrous consequences, such as occurred in South Africa at
the turn of this century. Thabo Mbeki, then president of that country, refused

to accept that AIDS was caused by the HIV virus, believing instead that it was a
side effect of malnutrition and the medications used to treat AIDS itself. In
the absence of an effective treatment and prevention program, it is estimated
that 365,000 South Africans died prematurely of AIDS between the years 2000-05
(currently, 18.1 percent of South African adults have HIV/AIDS).

Those
who would seize the opportunity to cast psychiatry as a discipline into the
rubbish heap without consideration for the benefits it has brought to so many
would do well to remember how Mbeki’s inability to distinguish between theory
and fact exacted such an enormous toll in human life and
suffering.

Dr. Dennis Rosen is a pediatric lung and sleep specialist
at Children’s Hospital Boston and an instructor in pediatrics at Harvard Medical
School.
[]
© Copyright 2010 Globe Newspaper
Company.

1,375 total views, no views today

PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
so.
__________________________________
Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
were the answer.
‘They made it seem like my world was falling
apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
take drugs, and
I didn’t want to, but they made me think
I really needed it. So I took them’.”

“She said that after a

few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
into a wall.’
She said that according to her doctor, these were
all symptoms of her depression, but
she thinks it was
the drugs.”

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
in cases of mild or moderate depression.

Depressing truth about antidepressants

by Tina
Amirkiai

Jan 27, 2010

If you are one of the millions of people taking
antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
placebo.

A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
severe acute depressions.”

Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

“The biological or physical
symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
“They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

Researchers used a
severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

Researchers concluded
that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
over placebo is substantial.”

Dobransky and other critics maintain that
the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
antidepressants.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
products to the general public.

Dobransky said a big part of the problem
is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
fixes like that do not exist.

“Each case needs to be set in its proper
place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

She said that
after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
thinks it was the drugs.

“I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

A spokesman for
GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
“the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
results.”

If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
Dashed line

©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
University.  A publication of the Medill
School
.

1,189 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother Kills Daughter: Attempts to Kill Son: CA

Paragraph eight reads:  “At the trial, Woo’s therapist
testified that she suffered from depression and had talked
repeatedly about committing suicide after stopping
her medication.

SSRI Stories note: Withdrawal can often be more dangerous than continuing on a
medication.  Withdrawal must be done slowly, over a period of a year or
more, under the supervision of a qualified specialist.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/11/25/BA7L1AQAUU.DTL&tsp=1

Linda Woo gets 25 to life for killing daughter

Justin Berton, Chronicle Staff Writer

Thursday, November 26,
2009
(11-25) 09:01 PST SAN FRANCISCO

A San Francisco woman
who asphyxiated her 3-year-old daughter during an apparent suicide attempt in
their Ingleside Terrace home has been sentenced to 25 years to life in
prison.

Linda Woo, 43, was sentenced Tuesday in San Francisco Superior
Court by Judge Cynthia Ming-Mei Lee for first-degree murder. Woo will serve a
concurrent term of seven years to life for the attempted murder of her
4-year-old son, who survived the incident.

On March 29, 2006, Woo was
found inside a car in her garage with her two unconscious children. The

daughter, Olive Murphy, was pronounced dead at the scene, and the boy suffered
brain injuries.

According to prosecutors, Woo told the children they were
going on a camping trip, led them into the car in the garage and lit a portable
barbecue.

Prosecutors said Woo had been trying to get back at a man who
broke off an affair with her while she was still married to the children’s
father.

When Woo didn’t bring the children to day care, the school
contacted her estranged husband. He called friends, one of whom discovered the

mother and children in the garage at 370 Moncada Way and phoned 911.

Woo,
who worked as a principal project manager at Pacific Gas and Electric Co. in San
Francisco, was treated for carbon monoxide poisoning.

At the trial,
Woo’s therapist testified that she suffered from depression and had talked
repeatedly about committing suicide after stopping her medication.

Woo’s
attorney argued that Woo grappled with a “major depressive disorder” that was so
severe she was not responsible for her acts.

A San Francisco jury
convicted her in April and rejected Woo’s claims the following month that she
had been insane at the time of the incident.

E-mail Justin Berton at jberton@sfchronicle.com.

Read
more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/11/25/BA7L1AQAUU.DTL&tsp=1#ixzz0Y6uEMyLv

1,732 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide by Train: India

Paragraph two reads:  “A BE graduate, Ajay of Tanuku in
West Godavari district was jobless for the past nine years, Nampally GRP
constable S Madhava Rao said. He was in a
state of
depression and was undergoing medication.”

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/PRP-activist-jumps-in-front-of-train/articleshow/5137281.cms

‘PRP activist’ jumps in front of train

TNN 19
October 2009, 03:15am IST

HYDERABAD: A 42-year-old engineer, who
claimed to be a PRP activist, committed suicide by throwing himself in front of
a train near Sanatnagar railway station on Sunday morning.

A BE
graduate, Ajay of Tanuku in West Godavari district was jobless for the past nine
years, Nampally GRP constable S Madhava Rao said. He was in a state of
depression and was undergoing medication.

On October 13, Ajay came to
his brother Vijay’s house in Kukatpally. Since then, he had been staying with
either his brother or his co-brother Mallikarjun in Kukatpally.

On
Saturday at about 7 pm, Ajay left his co-brother’s house saying that he would go
to a friend’s house. Later in the night, Ajay made a phone call to his
co-brother and told him that he was going to commit suicide.

“Mallikarjun, Vijay and his brother Nani rushed and searched on the
railway tracks around Hi-Tec City but could not find him,” the constable said.

On Sunday at about 7 am, police got information about the body on the
railway tracks near the Sanatnagar railway station.

Police found a
suicide note in the wallet of the victim. It said: “I am committing suicide as
it is hard for me to adjust in society. I am jobless and there is no respect for
me here. I had worked with PRP and during that time suffered a leg injury. I am
still suffering due to the injury due to which I am in financial troubles and
decided to commit suicide.”

Ajay is survived by his wife and 10-year-old
son. A suspicious death case was registered under section 174 of CrPC.

1,289 total views, 1 views today

ZOLOFT: Wrongful Death Suit Filed in Behalf of the Andrea Roberts’ Family

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

FINALLY!!!! A wrongful death suit that states these SSRI
wrongful death cases for what they really are: cold blooded premeditated murder!
When the risk is known and not stated, then what else could it be
other than premeditated murder? If it was an individual, rather than a wealthy
corporation who did this you had better believe they would be facing
premeditated murder charges.
___________________________________________
The label did contain a warning that children and teenagers
may have an increased risk of suicidal thinking, but it did not mention adults
being at risk of committing suicide or that the drug could cause any homicidal
thoughts or actions.

Because of the omissions from the label, the

plaintiffs allege Pfizer committed “fraud, misrepresentation, intentional
infliction of emotional distress, aggravated or gross negligence, battery,
assault, and potentially, premeditated murder.” . . .

“Defendants’
conduct was extreme and outrageous in character, and so extreme in degree as to
go beyond all possible bounds of decency as to be regarded as atrocious and
utterly intolerable in a civilized society,” the suit states.

Suit blames anti-depressant drug for 2007 murder-suicide
10/1/2009 2:43 PM By Marilyn Tennissen

[]

SHERMAN — In a suit recently transferred to the East
Texas federal court, the maker of a popular anti-depressant drug is being blamed
for a murder-suicide committed by a woman who had taken the drug.

Court
papers say that after taking Pfizer’s drug Zoloft, 41-year-old Andrea Roberts

shot and killed her two children and husband before turning the gun on
herself.

Her parents, Glenda and John Robert McCoy, and brother, John
Andrew McCoy, acting pro se, first filed a suit in Denton County on July 31 on
behalf of decedents Jon Andrea Roberts, Michael Roberts, Micayla Roberts and
Dylan Roberts.

Pfizer Inc., Pfizer Chairman Jeffrey Kindler, Pfizer
subsidiary Greenstone Pharmaceuticals and Does 1-50 were named as defendants.


Pfizer had the case transferred to the Sherman Division of
the Eastern District of Texas on Sept. 28.

According to the suit, on
July 24, 2007, Andrea Roberts bought Zoloft from a Tom Thumb Pharmacy in Flower
Mound.

Zoloft is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor prescribed to
patients for many psychiatric conditions and is designed to be taken orally once
a day or more often as directed by a physician.

The suit does not state
why Roberts was taking the medication, how long she had taken it or the doctor
who had prescribed it.


One week after she picked up the prescription, Andrea
Roberts and her family were dead.

Andrea Roberts allegedly shot and
killed her two children Micayla and Dylan, her husband, Michael, and then
committed suicide at their home in Denton on July 31, 2007. According to the

suit, in the days leading up to the incident Roberts had become paranoid and
delusional.

The surviving plaintiffs allege that the product Zoloft

caused these violent acts,” the complaint states. “In the alternative, the
surviving plaintiffs allege that the product Zoloft was a contributing cause
accounting for causing or worsening decedent Andrea Roberts‘ condition to the

point of causing paranoia, psychosis, homicidal thinking or other symptoms
inhibiting her judgment leading to the commission of homicidal and suicidal
actions.”

In its Notice of Removal, Pfizer argues there are many
inconsistencies in the plaintiffs’ complaint.

“Although this action can
be fairly characterized as a products liability case, plaintiffs purport to
assert a wide variety of claims in this lawsuit and their Petition is confusing
and contradictory,” Pfizer states.

The plaintiffs argue that because

Andrea Roberts did not consent to taking “a drug that causes homicide,” she
should be considered “involuntarily intoxicated” and therefore not guilty of
contributory negligence or assumption of risk.

Pfizer knew from reports
and studies that Zoloft could cause homicidal actions, the suit alleges, but
failed to include that information on the drug’s warning label.

The

label did contain a warning that children and teenagers may have an increased
risk of suicidal thinking, but it did not mention adults being at risk of
committing suicide or that the drug could cause any homicidal thoughts or
actions.

Because of the omissions from the label, the plaintiffs allege
Pfizer committed “fraud, misrepresentation, intentional infliction of emotional
distress, aggravated or gross negligence, battery, assault, and potentially,
premeditated murder.”

They also claim a safer alternative design of the

drug existed, but Pfizer “chose to manufacture and the dangerous drug anyway.”

“Defendants’ conduct was extreme and outrageous in character, and so
extreme in degree as to go beyond all possible bounds of decency as to be
regarded as atrocious and utterly intolerable in a civilized society,” the suit

states.

The plaintiffs cite several causes of action throughout the
complaint.

Pfizer argues that while the plaintiffs appear to be
asserting a claim for products liability, they also assert claims for negligent
manufacture, design and marketing; a wrongful death and survival action; and
intentional infliction of emotional distress as well as actual and punitive
damages.

They are also claiming breach of warranty, fraud,
misrepresentation, aggravated or gross negligence, battery, assault and even
murder.


Pfizer writes that the complaint incorrectly lists
Greenstone Pharmaceuticals as a subsidiary of Pfizer when it is not.

In
addition, Jeffrey Kindler is listed as a defendant in the style of the case, but

the petition does not identify him as a party to the case and there are no
allegations against Kindler in the complaint.

As to damages, Pfizer
points out the varying amounts mentioned in the plaintiffs’ petition.

In

one place, the plaintiffs state they are seeking to recover $900,000 in Andrea‘s
lost earnings and $4 million for Michael’s.

Then they ask for $23
million for the products liability claims, $20,000 for funeral and burial costs,
$1 million for each of the surviving plaintiffs and $5 million for each of the

decedents to compensate them for their loss of affection, companionship and
pecuniary support.

At other places in the complaint, it states
plaintiffs are limiting damages to $50,000.

The pro se Plaintiffs’
Petition appears to have been put together using a legal form,” Pfizer writes.

Pfizer is represented by Laura E. De Santos of Clark, Thomas &

Winters PC in Houston. Jack E. Urquhart of Clark, Thomas is of
counsel.

The case has been assigned to U.S. District Judge Michael H.
Schneider and referred to Magistrate Judge A. L. Mazzant.

Case No.
4:09-cv-496-MHS-ALM

1,245 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 77 Year Old Man Commits Suicide: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: Another example of just how truly amazing these antidepressants are! In growing up I do not recall ever hearing of someone this age committing suicide, much less a more violent suicide as we see with SSRI antidepressants! Now we not only have suicides and violent ones, but we have horribly violent murder/suicides in this age group! It is all so very sickening!!
Second paragraph reads:  “Bernard Jeenes, 77, was found dead in his kitchen, in Cayman Close, Popley, Basingstoke, on June 7, after taking an overdose of anti-depressants and hanging himself.”

http://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/news/4558306.Suicidal_man__let_down__by_system/

Suicidal man ‘let down’ by system

12:30pm Friday 21st August 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your say »

A GRIEVING son said his father should have been cared for at a Basingstoke psychiatric hospital to stop him from killing himself.

Bernard Jeenes, 77, was found dead in his kitchen, in Cayman Close, Popley, Basingstoke, on June 7, after taking an overdose of anti-depressants and hanging himself.

His son Mark, who found his body, told an inquest into his death that his father had begged to be admitted to the mental health unit at Parklands Hospital after a suicide attempt the week before he died.

Now he is calling for changes. Mr Jeenes, a 33-year-old decorator from Barbel Avenue, in Riverdene, told the inquest at Alton magistrates court: “I feel like my father has been let down and if he got the help he wanted he would still be here today.”

He said a week before he died, his father was admitted to Basingstoke hospital after taking an overdose of anti-depressants. He then asked to be transferred to neighbouring Parklands psychiatric hospital.

He told the coroner: “That should have got alarm bells ringing, but the doctor just said he would be better off at home. My father said he wanted to kill himself.”

He said his father had emerged “a new man” after a spell at Parklands in 2002.

However, the dead man’s psychiatric nurse, Chris Dale, told the inquest Mr Jeenes had been referred by a GP after he had phoned Parklands directly.

He said: “I saw him several times before his death and he didn’t tell me about wanting to go to Parklands. He mentioned he had some suicidal thoughts but that he had no plan or intent to take his life. He told me he wanted to avoid Parklands, and do things on his own.

“The last time I saw him, he was more positive.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, North East Hampshire coroner, Andrew Bradley, said: “Clearly what Mr Jeenes was sharing with his son was different from what he was sharing with Chris Dale.

“The concerns were there, the bells were ringing but the assessment pushed him out the Basingstoke hospital door.”

After the inquest, a spokesman for Hampshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, which runs Parklands Hospital, said staff who knew him had been deeply saddened by the death of Mr Jeenes.

An initial review into the circumstances had concluded that the right clinical decisions were made.

The spokesman added: “A further more detailed review is being carried out. It is important to note that the coroner, in full possession of all the facts, did not make any recommendations for the trust to implement.”

He said if a clinician wanted a patient admitted, a bed would be found.

Mr Jeenes’ story has come to light just weeks after The Gazette reported the inquest of Terry Thomas, aged 54, of Kenilworth Road, Winklebury, who died after jumping from a bridge on Ringway West A340 on April 1.

His widow Jane told an inquest he had been turned away from Parklands Hospital the day before his death, despite a failed suicide attempt.

Following that story, Gazette reader Hailey Newton Roast, aged 35, of Kings Furlong Centre, off Wessex Close, Basingstoke, contacted the newsdesk to speak of her experience.

She said: “I have manic depression and have tried to commit suicide a few times. Each time I was told I didn’t meet the criteria to be admitted to Parklands.

“The mental health services here are terrible and I’ve written several times to complain.”

1,443 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Police Stop Man From Committing Suicide: England

Paragraphs two and three read: “The attorney for Coram resident Brandon Hampson says he plans to argue that his client became violent and beat Lisa Essling on Aug. 25, 2006, because he stopped taking the popular antidepressant Zoloft days before the attack.”

“Nassau County District Court Judge Rhonda Fischer said Friday that she will allow a defense witness to testify that withdrawl from the antidepressant can cause a person to become aggressive.”

http://www.newsday.com/ny-judge-to-allow-zoloft-defense-in-assault-case-1.1388026

NY judge to allow “Zoloft defense” in assault case

August 22, 2009 By The Associated Press

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) A Long Island judge has said she will allow a man accused of punching and kicking his former girlfriend to use the so-called “Zoloft defense.”

The attorney for Coram resident Brandon Hampson says he plans to argue that his client became violent and beat Lisa Essling on Aug. 25, 2006, because he stopped taking the popular antidepressant Zoloft days before the attack.

Nassau County District Court Judge Rhonda Fischer said Friday that she will allow a defense witness to testify that withdrawl from the antidepressant can cause a person to become aggressive.

Prosecutors say they strongly disagree with the court’s decision.

Zoloft manufacturer Pfizer Inc. has said there’s not evidence to suggest that discontinuing the drug can cause violent behavior.

___

Information from: Newsday, http://www.newsday.com

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

1,365 total views, no views today