ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Found Not Guilty of Killing Wife While Asleep: England

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read:  “Swansea Crown Court heard
Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the
couple, who slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical experts said the sudden withdrawal of
the drugs could have led to him having very vivid dreams.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/briton-who-strangled-wife-in-his-sleep-walks-free/article1371102/

Briton who strangled wife in his sleep walks free

Prosecution accepts argument that Brian Thomas, 59, suffered sleep
disorder and had no control over his body during attack.

London ­
Reuters Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 9:21AM EST Last updated on Friday,
Nov. 20, 2009 1:50PM EST

A Briton who strangled his wife during a
nightmare because he believed he was attacking an intruder, walked free from
court on Friday after prosecutors withdrew their case against him.

Brian
Thomas, 59, of Neath in South Wales, killed his wife Christine, 57, while they
were on holiday in July last year.

Prosecutors had accepted that Thomas
had a sleep disorder and so had no control over his body when he attacked his

wife of 40 years while they were both asleep.

“I must emphasize that the
circumstances of this case are almost unique in the UK and there have been fewer
than 50 instances recorded worldwide,” said Iwan Jenkins, Chief Crown Prosecutor
for Dyfed Powys.

Mr. Thomas admitted being responsible but instead of

charging him with murder or manslaughter, prosecutors had sought a special
verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity, the Press Association reported.

“The consequences of such a finding would have meant Mr. Thomas’s
detention in a psychiatric hospital, but it is now clear that the psychiatrists
feel that that would serve no useful purpose,” Mr. Jenkins said.

Swansea
Crown Court heard Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the couple, who
slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical
experts said the sudden withdrawal of the drugs could have led to him having
very vivid dreams.

The court was told the couple had been asleep in
their camper van in a pub car park when they were disturbed by youths in cars
performing wheel spins and so moved elsewhere.

However, Mr. Thomas then
had a dream one of the youths had broken into the van and later woke to find
himself next to his wife‘s body, at which point he called the police.

High Court Judge Justice Davis told Mr. Thomas, who had been in custody
since January, that in the eyes of the law he bore no responsibility for what he
had done and said he was a “decent man and devoted husband”.

Mr.
Thomas’s brother Raymond Thomas said the death and court case had been very
distressing.

“They were a loving couple and always like that together,”
he said. “He has always been a loving husband and a family man. This was a
tragic, tragic episode and we are all very emotional.”

1,380 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Road Rage Driver Attacks School Bus Children

Paragraphs one through three read:  “Youngsters were
terrified when a roadrage driver smashed a school bus window with a
crook lock.”

“Glass shattered over the driver, while children were on
their way home from school.”

“Robert John Alan Campbell (30) had

earlier attacked two other vehicles, frightening the occupants, including
an elderly couple.”

Paragraphs 19 and 20 read:  “He said Campbell
was unable to cope while suffering from a personality disorder brought on by
stress and depression.”

“Campbell’s medication
stopped a few weeks before the road rage outburst,
but when he tried
to seek help he ran out of patience waiting in the doctor’s
surgery.”

SSRI Stories note: Withdrawal can
often be more dangerous than continuing on a medication.  Withdrawal must
be done slowly, over a period of a year or more, under the supervision of a
qualified specialist.

http://www.thisisleicestershire.co.uk/news/Roadrage-attacker-terrified-pupils-Leicester-jailed/article-1540590-detail/article.html

Roadrage attacker who terrified pupils in Leicester is
jailed

Wednesday, November 25, 2009,
09:30

Youngsters were terrified when a roadrage driver smashed a school
bus window with a crook lock.

Glass shattered over the driver, while

children were on their way home from school.

Robert John Alan Campbell
(30) had earlier attacked two other vehicles, frightening the occupants,
including an elderly couple.

Campbell, a married dad of three, was jailed
for 16 months after admitting three counts of causing damage and one of having
an offensive weapon – the crook lock.

Janet Hall, prosecuting, told
Leicester Crown Court that Campbell, who had run out of medication for a mental
health problem, committed the offences between 3pm and 4pm, on September
18.

The first happened when a pensioner in Groby Road, Leicester, braked
suddenly at red lights.

Ms Hall said: “The defendant was behind her and
very angry, gesticulating.

“To her horror, he got out of the car and
began throwing his arms around, shouting aggressively, causing her to lock her
door and feel very intimidated.”

Her husband, who suffered from ill
health, was also in the car.

Campbell kicked the driver‘s door, causing
£1,109 damage.

A short time later, Campbell lost his temper with a
motorist coming out of the Tesco car park in Beaumont Leys,
Leicester.

The driver, who was with his girlfriend, locked the doors when
the defendant got out of his vehicle and shouted “What’s your
problem?”

The defendant wielded what looked like a baseball bat, but was
a crook lock, which he used to strike the victim’s bonnet, causing £554 of
damage.

The school bus driver, travelling from Birstall towards
Glenfield, encountered the defendant when taking a wide turn, causing Campbell
to brake.

The defendant got out and, armed with his crook lock, smashed
the driver‘s window.

When the police went to Campbell’s home in Dominion

Road, Glenfield, he said: “The crook lock I used is in the front of my
car.”

The defendant also admitted damaging a TV set at Cash Generators,
in the city centre, on July 10, following an argument with staff.

Paul
Trotter, defending, said: “He’s not a man hell bent on criminality but a man
with problems and needs his medication properly managed.”

He said
Campbell was unable to cope while suffering from a personality disorder brought
on by stress and depression.

Campbell’s medication stopped a few weeks
before the road rage outburst, but when he tried to seek help he ran out of
patience waiting in the doctor’s surgery.

His health had since greatly
improved.

Judge Sylvia De Bertodano said the incidents had particularly
frightened the “vulnerable” elderly couple and the schoolchildren.

She
said: “If you smash windows of a bus with people on it, you take the risk that
someone inside will be injured.

“It’s no thanks to you that no-one was
hurt.

“I’ve seen a psychiatric report and have heard you’ve had
difficulties with your mental health, but the disorder you’ve been suffering
from doesn’t mean I’m not required to send you to prison.

“This sort of
behaviour was quite terrifying to members of the public going about their daily
business.”

1,910 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault with Knife: England

Second paragraph from the end reads:  “He was
taking anti-depressants when he met his ex by accident in a
pub and began drinking heavily.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.
Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.eveshamjournal.co.uk/news/4757634.Heartbroken_man_stabbed_best_friend/

Heartbroken man stabbed best friend

5:09pm Tuesday
24th November 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

A HEARTBROKEN man stabbed his best friend in the stomach after
breaking up with his girlfriend.

John Withers had been homeless since
the split but was given shelter by Trevor Phillips, a former work colleague.

But Withers got drunk after an unexpected meeting with his ex-partner
and returned to Mr Phillips’ house in the village of Wickhamford, near Evesham,
in “a zombie state”, said Alex Warren, prosecuting.

He stuck the kitchen

knife four inches into Mr Phillips’ stomach in an unprovoked attack.

When police arrived, Withers was drinking a can of beer and the victim
still had the blade protruding from his body, Worcester Crown Court heard.

Withers, aged 44, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to unlawful
wounding and was jailed for 27 months.

Judge Richard Rundell said an
inch or two either way and Withers could have been facing a murder charge.

He accepted a defence submission that the attack was “inexplicable” and
said Withers might have mental health issues.

Mr Phillips, who lived
with his wife and step daughter, had known the defendant for 15 years and took
pity on him when he became homeless at the end of his romance, said Mr Warren.

But on June 26 Withers was spoken to by Mr Phillips about being drunk
and an argument blew up.

Later that evening Withers returned to the
address. The victim was making coffee when he felt the knife blow.

The
blade did not enter the abdominal cavity and he recovered after an operation.

Francis Laird, defending, said Withers had gone through a stressful
break-up and was “totally heartbroken”.

He was taking anti-depressants
when he met his ex by accident in a pub and began drinking heavily.

Mr
Laird said: “He became overwhelmed and did something quite inexplicable. He is
deeply sorry for what he did. It may have been out of his control.”

1,273 total views, 3 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Knife Attack: England

Second paragraph from the end reads:  “He was
taking anti-depressants when he met his ex by accident in a
pub and began drinking heavily.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.
Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.eveshamjournal.co.uk/news/4757634.Heartbroken_man_stabbed_best_friend/

Heartbroken man stabbed best friend

5:09pm Tuesday
24th November 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

A HEARTBROKEN man stabbed his best friend in the stomach after
breaking up with his girlfriend.

John Withers had been homeless since
the split but was given shelter by Trevor Phillips, a former work colleague.

But Withers got drunk after an unexpected meeting with his ex-partner
and returned to Mr Phillips’ house in the village of Wickhamford, near Evesham,
in “a zombie state”, said Alex Warren, prosecuting.

He stuck the kitchen
knife four inches into Mr Phillips’ stomach in an unprovoked attack.

When police arrived, Withers was drinking a can of beer and the victim
still had the blade protruding from his body, Worcester Crown Court heard.

Withers, aged 44, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to unlawful
wounding and was jailed for 27 months.

Judge Richard Rundell said an
inch or two either way and Withers could have been facing a murder charge.

He accepted a defence submission that the attack was “inexplicable” and
said Withers might have mental health issues.

Mr Phillips, who lived
with his wife and step daughter, had known the defendant for 15 years and took
pity on him when he became homeless at the end of his romance, said Mr Warren.

But on June 26 Withers was spoken to by Mr Phillips about being drunk
and an argument blew up.

Later that evening Withers returned to the
address. The victim was making coffee when he felt the knife blow.

The
blade did not enter the abdominal cavity and he recovered after an operation.

Francis Laird, defending, said Withers had gone through a stressful
break-up and was “totally heartbroken”.

He was taking anti-depressants
when he met his ex by accident in a pub and began drinking heavily.

Mr
Laird said: “He became overwhelmed and did something quite inexplicable. He is
deeply sorry for what he did. It may have been out of his control.”

1,165 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Man Found Not Guilty of Killing Wife While Asleep

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read:  “Swansea Crown Court heard
Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the
couple, who slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical experts said the sudden withdrawal of

the drugs could have led to him having very vivid dreams.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/briton-who-strangled-wife-in-his-sleep-walks-free/article1371102/

Briton who strangled wife in his sleep walks free

Prosecution accepts argument that Brian Thomas, 59, suffered sleep
disorder and had no control over his body during attack.

London ­
Reuters Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 9:21AM EST Last updated on Friday,
Nov. 20, 2009 1:50PM EST

A Briton who strangled his wife during a
nightmare because he believed he was attacking an intruder, walked free from
court on Friday after prosecutors withdrew their case against him.

Brian
Thomas, 59, of Neath in South Wales, killed his wife Christine, 57, while they
were on holiday in July last year.

Prosecutors had accepted that Thomas
had a sleep disorder and so had no control over his body when he attacked his

wife of 40 years while they were both asleep.

“I must emphasize that the
circumstances of this case are almost unique in the UK and there have been fewer
than 50 instances recorded worldwide,” said Iwan Jenkins, Chief Crown Prosecutor
for Dyfed Powys.

Mr. Thomas admitted being responsible but instead of

charging him with murder or manslaughter, prosecutors had sought a special
verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity, the Press Association reported.

“The consequences of such a finding would have meant Mr. Thomas’s
detention in a psychiatric hospital, but it is now clear that the psychiatrists
feel that that would serve no useful purpose,” Mr. Jenkins said.

Swansea
Crown Court heard Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the couple, who
slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical
experts said the sudden withdrawal of the drugs could have led to him having
very vivid dreams.

The court was told the couple had been asleep in
their camper van in a pub car park when they were disturbed by youths in cars
performing wheel spins and so moved elsewhere.

However, Mr. Thomas then
had a dream one of the youths had broken into the van and later woke to find
himself next to his wife‘s body, at which point he called the police.

High Court Judge Justice Davis told Mr. Thomas, who had been in custody
since January, that in the eyes of the law he bore no responsibility for what he
had done and said he was a “decent man and devoted husband”.

Mr.
Thomas’s brother Raymond Thomas said the death and court case had been very
distressing.

“They were a loving couple and always like that together,”
he said. “He has always been a loving husband and a family man. This was a
tragic, tragic episode and we are all very emotional.”

1,890 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Stabs & Kills Wife: England

Paragraphs 18 & 19 read:  “In the witness box, Mr
Sinclair also described how he had been depressed at
various times in his life, particularly after the death of his father.”

“He told the court he had been taking medication
and was smoking up to 100 cigarettes a day.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/hampshire/8319055.stm

Page last updated at 17:40 GMT, Wednesday, 21
October 2009 18:40 UK

Phone boss ‘traded knife swipes’

Sally Sinclair was
head of business analysis at Vodafone

A man accused of murdering his
Vodafone executive wife has told a court the pair traded swipes with knives
after she admitted having an affair.

Sally Sinclair, 40, was found
with more than 30 stab wounds at their home in Amport, Hampshire, in August
2008.

At the time, she was head of business analysis at the mobile phone
firm’s world headquarters near Newbury.

Alisdair Sinclair, 48, formerly
of Georgia Lane, Amport, began giving his evidence at Winchester Crown Court.

Mr Sinclair cried several times in court, the BBC’s Steve Humphrey said.

The defendant told the court he had run at his wife of 21 years while
she finally admitted to having an affair, while they argued in the kitchen of
their rented luxury property.

[]
[]

I would give up my life for Sally but I thought I was dying
[]

Alisdair Sinclair

Mr Sinclair, a house husband, told the jury she had
got a knife from a block and stabbed him in the hands while he shielded himself.

He then got a knife himself, he said, and they traded swipes before he
was stabbed in the stomach.

Eventually, he lunged at her neck in a
panic, as he thought he was dying, and she had fallen to the floor “like a
stone”, the court heard.

“All I remember thinking is I’m dying, I’m
dying – Sally’s strong,” he said.

“If I had known what had happened I
would have more than willingly died instead – that’s for sure. I would give up
my life for Sally but I thought I was dying.”

‘100 cigarettes a
day’

He said he remembered nothing after kneeling beside her and
thinking she was dead, including inflicting a massive sawn wound to her neck.

Mr Sinclair admitted in court that he had killed his wife and had
inflicted the “horrible” injuries, but said he had never meant to do it and that
it was self defence up until the point she had fallen.

His defence
counsel Robert Fortune QC asked: “Were all the injuries self-defence or beyond
self-defence?”
The couple rented the secluded detached house in
Amport

Mr Sinclair replied: “I believe it went beyond self-defence.”

In the witness box, Mr Sinclair also described how he had been depressed
at various times in his life, particularly after the death of his father.

He told the court he had been taking medication and was smoking up to
100 cigarettes a day.

Mr Sinclair also gave the jury an insight into his
obsessive behaviour.

He said he often bought dozens of pairs of socks
and trousers and the couple also had a collection of very expensive cars.

He hardly ever drove them, he told the court.

The trial
continues.

1,319 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder : Man Kills Wife with Hammer: England

Paragraph 22 reads:  “Ignatius Hughes, defending, said
that in June 2008 his client was “on the brink” psychologically and had a long
history of depression for which he had been
prescribed medication.”

http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/homepage/Bristol-mum-bludgeoned-death-lump-hammer/article-1449304-detail/article.html

Bristol mum bludgeoned to death with a lump hammer

Saturday, October 24, 2009, 07:00

A man who bludgeoned his partner
to death with a lump hammer while in the grip of psychosis has been told he may
never be released from jail.

Paul Ford, aged 51, told police he thought
he had hit mother-of-five Debra Ford “hundreds and hundreds and hundreds” of
times in the face at the home they shared in Oldland Common.

He was
jailed indefinitely at Bristol Crown Court yesterday for what a judge described
as a “truly terrible” killing, which left his victim unrecognisable.

The
court heard the couple shared the same surname because Mrs Ford, 45, had
previously been married to the defendant’s brother Geoffrey, with whom she had
two children, and had also been married to his brother Steve.

Her three
other children were by another man.

Ford initially faced a murder charge
but pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished
responsibility.

Doctors later confirmed a combination of drug use,
post-accident stress disorder and depression all contributed to his psychosis at
the time.

Imposing an indefinite sentence for public protection, Mr
Justice Royce said Ford would serve a minimum of three years before he could be
considered for release. But he stressed that he considered Ford to be dangerous
and, if it was deemed appropriate by the Parole Board, he could face the rest of
his life behind bars.

Ray Tully, prosecuting, told the court the couple’s
relationship, which had started in 2007, was “volatile on both sides”.

In
the 48 hours leading up to the killing they were seen in two pubs; in one Ford
scuffled with a man and in the other Debra was seen “goading” the
defendant.

Mr Tully said Ford attacked his partner in the living room of
their home at The Clamp, Oldland Common, on the evening of September 3 last
year.

“She was battered round the head with such force her facial
features became indiscernible,” said Mr Tully.

“He walked next door,
still carrying the hammer, he spoke to a neighbour and asked her to call the
police.

“He said: ‘I hit her, I killed her, I done it so my boys will be
safe’.”

Mr Tully said Debra Ford had for a long time associated with a
large number of people who led a criminal lifestyle.

He said that, at the
time of her death, she was waiting to be sentenced for dishonesty and drug
supply, and had been a regular user of amphetamine and cannabis.

Mr Tully
said: “There is clear evidence Debra Ford could be argumentative and
manipulative.

“Her daughter said that she also suffered from bad health,
having had surgery in 2003 for an abscess to her back which made her wheelchair
bound. Thereafter she walked with calipers and used walking sticks to get about
and she was considered frail and vulnerable.”

On the day of the killing
Ford ate with his parents and brothers and told Geoffrey: “You know I’m an angry

man. I’m an angry man at the best of times.”

He was then seen to turn up
at The Clamp, and was alone with Debra when he unleashed the fatal
attack.

The court heard Ford told police: “We had a scuffle and I just
did her. I don’t know where I got it (the hammer) from. I just grabbed it from
something. I thought that there were people upstairs; I thought I was being
trapped and cornered. I’m turning into a paranoid wreck. I’ve had so much
hassle; I thought I was being trapped.”

Ignatius Hughes, defending, said
that in June 2008 his client was “on the brink” psychologically and had a long
history of depression for which he had been prescribed medication.

He
said it would be impossible to establish what degree of real threats Ford
experienced as opposed to his perceived threats because of psychosis.

Mr
Hughes said the relationship was the catalyst, which made a re-occurrence most
unlikely.

The majority of psychiatrists who examined Ford did not
conclude it would be appropriate for him to be treated in a psychiatric
institution.

Passing sentence, Mr Justice Royce told Ford: “This was a
truly terrible killing. The lives of those closest to her have been terribly
scarred in consequence.”

1,526 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Compulsions for Alcohol, Violence: Man Stabs Friend: England

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for

alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol

were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

1,068 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Attacks Another Woman & Gets One Year Jail Term: England

Last two paragraphs read:  “He said: “She was on
anti-depressants at the time.
It seems the combination of those
circumstances and difficulties at the time led her to flare up in an
inappropriate, serious manner.”

” ‘There was a conversation and she
reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner’.”

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Mum-jailed-vicious-city-centre-attack/article-1331385-detail/article.html

Mum-of-three jailed after vicious city centre attack

Saturday, September 12, 2009, 07:00

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A MOTHER-OF-THREE has been jailed for a
year after attacking a woman she accused of being a prostitute.

Kerrie
Thomas, 31, of Stotfield Road, Bilborough, repeatedly punched the woman in the
face and kicked her.

The victim, who had been out with a friend on
Valentine’s Night, lost her little fingernails as she defended herself and had
scratches to her jaw and a swollen nose.

Police came to her rescue and
tracked down and arrested Thomas.

At Nottingham Crown Court, Thomas
pleaded guilty to assault causing actual bodily harm.

Judge Dudley
Bennett said she would get credit for her plea, but added: “This was a very
serious assault. It was a gratuitous assault, unprovoked, upon another woman of
a similar sort of age.

“You punched her and kicked her in the face on the
floor, and it has had a profound effect on her. The fact remains you have a
number of prior convictions for violence, house burglary, robbery and wounding
in 2001. This kind of gratuitous violence cannot be tolerated.”

The
victim, aged 36, had been with a friend at 2am on Sunday, February 15, when she
was attacked.

She was eating food in St James’s Street, Nottingham city
centre, when she saw Thomas with an elderly friend and went to check he was OK
as she thought he was vulnerable.

Thomas came over, said, “how dare you”,
and accused the woman of being a prostitute and taking advantage of the man, the
court heard.

Robbie Singh, prosecuting, said after Thomas punched the

woman in the face, she fell to the floor and curled up in a ball. She was then
kicked in the face. Afterwards, the victim had bruising to her head and could
not brush her hair or speak properly for a week.

“In April this year she
said she was nervous, her confidence has gone and she has to be met in town if
she catches a bus on her own,” said Mr Singh.

Andrew Wesley, mitigating,
said Thomas was previously in a long-term relationship that broke up against a
background of domestic violence.

He said: “She was on anti-depressants at
the time. It seems the combination of those circumstances and difficulties at
the time led her to flare up in an inappropriate, serious manner.

“There
was a conversation and she reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: VIOLENCE: MAN STABS FRIEND: ENGLAND

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol
were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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