LEXAPRO: Murder: Defense of Involuntary Intoxication: Louisiana

First two paragraphs read:  “A Baton Rouge man is not
criminally responsible for the murder of his ex-fiancée and attempted murder of
one of her neighbors in 2008 because he was involuntarily intoxicated at the
time,
one of his attorneys told a jury Wednesday.”

Defense lawyer
Tommy Damico argued in his opening statement that Frederick Dominique Reed
Jr. had a violent reaction to the prescribed anti-depressant

Lexapro, which he began taking in early August
2008.”

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/82864837.html?showAll=y&c=y

Murder trial defense: Intoxication

  • By JOE GYAN JR.
  • Advocate staff writer
  • Published: Jan 28, 2010 – Page: 2B

A Baton Rouge man is not
criminally responsible for the murder of his ex-fiancée and attempted murder of

one of her neighbors in 2008 because he was involuntarily intoxicated at the
time, one of his attorneys told a jury Wednesday.

Defense lawyer Tommy
Damico argued in his opening statement that Frederick Dominique Reed Jr. had a
violent reaction to the prescribed anti-depressant Lexapro, which he began
taking in early August 2008.

But a prosecutor countered that Reed was
“very calculated’’ in hunting down Mia Reid and shooting her at her
Scotlandville apartment while she slept next to her 10-year-old daughter on Aug.
23, 2008.

Assistant District Attorney Melissa Morvant also noted in her
opening statement that Reid’s request for a temporary restraining order against
Reed was denied Aug. 12, 2008, and that a hearing on a permanent protective
order was to be held Aug. 26, 2008.

East Baton Rouge Parish sheriff’s
deputies arrested Reed on a count of domestic abuse battery in March 2008, but
Reid dropped the complaint, her temporary restraining order petition
stated.

At the end of July 2008, Reid and her daughter moved out of an
apartment near Siegen Lane that they shared with Reed to a new apartment in
north Baton Rouge, friends and relatives have said.

Reed, 39, is charged
with second-degree murder in the killing of Reid, 31, and attempted
second-degree murder in the wounding of Richard Kuti.

A second-degree

murder conviction carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison.

State
District Judge Tony Marabella is presiding over the trial, which will resume
today.

Morvant told jurors that Reed first entered apartment 23 at the
Ashley Oak complex on Rosenwald Road and shot Kuti three times while he slept,
then went to apartment 33 and shot Reid.

“While Mia Reid is sleeping on
an air mattress with her 10-year-old daughter, he shoots her twice,’’ Morvant
said.

Later, as authorities closed in on him on Villa Drive, Reed tried
to commit suicide by shooting himself in the chest, she said.

Kuti and
his roommate, Courvasier Jones, testified they did not know Reed or Reid. Jones
said he heard shots and Reed appeared in his room asking for Reid. He said he
told Reed that he did not know Reid or where she was, and Reed
left.

“When I was wrapping up his (Kuti’s) arm with an Ace bandage, I
heard more shots,’’ Jones testified.

Meghan Green, who said Reid was her
best friend, testified she raced to Reid’s apartment complex after Reid’s
daughter called her.

“When (she) jumped into my arms, she had Mia’s
bloody cell phone,’’ Green testified.

Damico asked the jury to “keep an
open mind’’ and not have an “emotional or gut reaction’’ to the tragic events
that he argued were “not the legal fault’’ of his client.

“This is not a
case about who did it or how it was done,’’ he said. “It is about why it
happened and what caused it.’’

Damico added that Reed’s involuntary

intoxication was the “direct cause’’ of the shootings.

“The drug did not
interact with Frederick Reed as it was prescribed to do,’’ he said. “Some people
are affected in very dangerous ways.’’

“But for the involuntary
intoxication, Frederick Reed would not have committed these acts,’’ he
added.

Louisiana law says an offender is exempt from criminal
responsibility if intoxication is involuntary and the circumstances indicate the
condition was the direct cause of the commission of the
crime.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Father Takes 2 Daughters on Terror Ride: Massachusetts

Paragraph five reads:  “It was not immediately clear what
precipitated Thursday’s terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off
carpenter was taking antidepressants, has been having
medical and family issues, and had banged his head against the truck prior to
the incident.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100109/NEWS/1090332/-1/news

Freetown man held on bail for allegedly crashing truck with young
daughters inside

By Brian
Fraga
bfraga@s-t.com
January 09, 2010 12:00 AM

FALL RIVER ­ A
Freetown man ordered his two young daughters into his pickup truck and took them
on a terrifying ride around his property Thursday afternoon, crashing into
rocks, trees, a camper and a building, while the girls screamed and asked their

father if he was trying to kill them, according to authorities.

The 10-
and 12-year-old girls were cut by flying glass, and one girl’s head slammed
against a window, shattering the glass, authorities said. The ordeal ended when
the truck slammed into the camper and stalled, allowing the girls to escape and
run into their house, where they called 911, according to court
records.

The children were taken to St. Anne’s Hospital in Fall River and
treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

The girls’ father, Mark W.
Haskins, 39, of 24 Locust St., faces numerous criminal charges that include
assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, reckless operation of a motor
vehicle, malicious destruction of property and failing to have the girls wear
seat belts.

It was not immediately clear what precipitated Thursday’s
terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off carpenter was taking
antidepressants, has been having medical and family issues, and had banged his
head against the truck prior to the incident.

“He has little recollection
of what happened here,” said defense lawyer Donald Friar, who described the
episode as “an aberration.”

Haskins was arraigned on the charges Friday
in Fall River District Court and held on $10,000 cash bail. Friar had asked for
$500 bail, but Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Gonzalez cited concerns for
the children’s safety and noted that Haskins had originally fled from
police.

Haskins, who is the son of retired Freetown Fire Chief Wayne
Haskins, turned himself in to local police just before 11 a.m. Friday. On

Thursday, Freetown and Berkley police used dogs to scour the Freetown woods for
more than four hours, while a state police helicopter searched from the
air.

Haskins allegedly ran into the woods after he went inside his house
and apologized to his daughters, telling them he loved them and that it would be
the last time they saw him, court records said.

Police said the girls’
mother was reluctant to cooperate with officers.

When Freetown police
arrived just after 4:30 p.m., Thursday, they were met by Martha Haskins, who
allegedly cursed at the officers when they told her they were investigating the
incident.

Police said she told the officers, “We can smash our own things
if we want,” and, “It’s not a big deal. Nobody got killed.”

Martha
Haskins also reportedly resisted efforts to transport the girls to the
hospital.

Police said she also scolded her daughters for calling 911,
telling them: “I’m going to stay with your father because we’re married and you
two can go live with DSS. I don’t care.”

The Department of Children and
Families, formerly the Department of Social Services, was contacted and is
investigating. According to court records, a DCF case worker told police the
agency dealt with the family years ago when the couple reportedly abandoned a
son who was subsequently taken into DCF custody.

Alison Goodwin, a DCF
spokeswoman, said the girls are currently in the mother’s custody.

A
phone message left Friday at the Haskins’ residence was not
returned.

Freetown police interviewed the girls at the hospital Thursday.
They said their father ordered them into his truck, then began driving into
trees, rocks, a small building and a camper on the Locust Street property, court
records said.

When one girl tried to call for help on her cell phone,
Haskins ordered her to put it away. The girls said he pointed at objects right
before crashing into them. But when one girl asked him he if was trying to kill
them, Haskins said, “No, I’m not going to kill you.”

Police later secured
a search warrant and seized computer equipment connected to a surveillance
system on the property.

Haskins is scheduled to return to court Feb. 3.
Mooney ordered him to stay away from his daughters and to comply with any DCF
instructions.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother Kills Baby: Pennsylvania

Paragraph 16 reads:  “The defendant’s defense lawyer,
Pietro Joseph D’Angelo, told the court that at the time of the baby’s death,
Brown should have been taking medication for depression and
anxiety.”

“Brown, who is currently back
on prescription medication,
testified she is better able to
cope.”

http://www.timesherald.com/articles/2009/11/21/news/doc4b0772fcf0acd165303912.txt

By KEITH PHUCAS
Times Herald Staff

COURTHOUSE
­ A Norristown woman who admitted causing fatal injuries to her 20-month-old
toddler last November, when she shook him and banged his head against a bed
headboard, was sentenced to prison Friday.

Jennifer Brown, 24, who
pleaded guilty in September to involuntary manslaughter and endangering the
welfare of a child, was sentenced by Montgomery County Judge William R.
Carpenter to 11 1/2 to 23 months behind bars and three years’
probation.

Brown has already been incarcerated for seven months and is
eligible for Montgomery County Correctional Facility’s Work Release
Program.

She severely injured her son, Lathario Brown-Jacobs, on Nov. 25
in his bedroom at the family’s East Jacoby Street home, and the child died in
the hospital three days later.

After paramedics attempted to treat the
child at the scene, he was taken to Montgomery Hospital. Physicians there
suspected the severe trauma was not accidentally inflicted, and the child was
transferred to Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia, where he was put on life
support.

When the injured boy was initially hospitalized, the woman
claimed she was awakened by sounds coming from her son’s room at 3 a.m.,
according to court papers, and when she went to check on him, he was having
difficulty breathing.

The mother claimed she tried to wake him, but he
reportedly didn’t respond, and she got upset and began shaking him and hit his
head several times, according to authorities. Around 4 a.m., the mother called
911 to report her son was having breathing problems.

A Norristown day
care center that took care of Lathario Brown on a regular basis told
investigators that the boy frequently had a bloody nose or bloody lip when he
was dropped off in the morning, according to court papers.

When
Norristown Detective David Mazza and County Detective Rich Nilsen interviewed
Brown a second time, she admitted shaking the boy and hitting his head several
times on the headboard or the wall, and at some point the toddler “went
limp.”

According to court records, Dr. Chase Blanchard, a forensic
pathologist with the Philadelphia Medical Examiner’s Office, performed an
autopsy. Dr. Lucy Rorke-Adams, an expert in neuropathology, examined the child’s
brain tissue, and concluded he died as a result of a severe brain
injury.

The defendant’s mother, Eleanor Brown, and the child’s father,
Terrence Jacobs, testified at the sentencing hearing.

“My daughter has
been through a lot of pain and suffering,” Eleanor Brown said. “This has made
her stronger.”

Jacobs, who is also the father of the 24-year-old woman’s
other children, described her as a “very passionate” person. He said the couple
had lived together in Augusta, Ga., but the couple split up and Brown returned
to Norristown.

“She was the thread that held our family together,” he
said.

The defendant’s defense lawyer, Pietro Joseph D’Angelo, told the
court that at the time of the baby’s death, Brown should have been taking
medication for depression and anxiety.

Brown, who is currently back on
prescription medication, testified she is better able to cope.

“It makes
me feel real calm,” she said.

Brown, who graduated from Norristown Area
High School in 2003, played on the school’s field hockey and lacrosse
teams.

Just prior to sentencing, Carpenter said the defendant had no
prior criminal record and was actively participating in counseling programs in
prison.

“I find she is genuinely remorseful, and has the support from her
family,” the judge said.

Since the child’s death nearly a year ago,
Brown’s brother and father have also died.

“She has suffered, and we all
have suffered,” Eleanor Brown said.

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