DEPRESSION MED: Well-Known Businessman, 52, Dies in Fall Down Stairs: UK

Paragraph one reads:  “A wellknown Suffolk businessman
fell to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed
after the collapse of his company, an inquest heard.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the
medication her husband was taking before his death had
made him  ‘
dozy’.”

http://www.eadt.co.uk/content/eadt/news/story.aspx?brand=EADOnline&category=News&tBrand=EADOnline&tCategory=xDefault&itemid=IPED17%20Feb%202010%2023%3A34%3A21%3A990

Businessman‘s stairs fall death remains a mystery

LAURENCE CAWLEY

Last
updated: 2/18/2010 11:56:00 AM

A WELLKNOWN Suffolk businessman fell
to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed after the collapse of his
company, an inquest heard.

Clive Thomas, 52, the former managing director
of Anglia Recruitment Group, was reported dead by his wife Jan at their home in

Coddenham Road, Needham Market, in May last year after she found him lying at
the bottom of the stairs.

During an inquest held in Bury St Edmunds
yesterday, it emerged the businessman, who was also a past chairman of the
Suffolk branch of the Institute of Directors and raised tens of thousands of
pounds for a range of charities, had suffered “severe” depression after his firm
went into liquidation.

It was heard that two separate post mortem
examinations to determine the cause of death had proved
inconclusive.

Chief Inspector Nick Bennett said Mr Thomas had suffered a
“nasty injury” to the back of his head during the fall but this had not caused
his death.

He said during the police investigation it emerged Mr Thomas
had endured “quite a severe episode of stress” when his business went into
liquidation earlier in the year for which he was prescribed
medication.

Ch Insp Bennett told how toxicology tests revealed Mr Thomas,
who had an enlarged heart, had consumed alcohol prior to his death and would
have been “unsteady on his feet” at the time of fall.

He also said foul
play had been ruled out.

Greater Suffolk Coroner Dr Peter Dean attributed
cause of death to “postural asphyxiation”, which meant Mr Thomas was unable to
breathe because of the way he was lying at the foot of the stairs.

“We
are not exactly sure how the fall actually occurred,” he said before recording a
narrative verdict that Mr Thomas had died from consequences of a fall down the

stairs.

After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the medication
her husband was taking before his death had made him “dozy”.

Mr Thomas’s mother Cathy Meadows added: “We still don’t know
what happened. There are lots of questions in my mind – but what can you do?”
she asked. “He did lots of things for charities. I am very proud of him. He was
such a good and kindly man and he was always trying to help other people. I
still really cannot believe he has gone. He was such a lovely son to me. I just
can’t believe it – it was such a shock. I just can’t get over this – he was my
only son.”

 1,385 total views,  2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Found Not Guilty of Killing Wife While Asleep: England

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read:  “Swansea Crown Court heard
Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the
couple, who slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical experts said the sudden withdrawal of
the drugs could have led to him having very vivid dreams.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/briton-who-strangled-wife-in-his-sleep-walks-free/article1371102/

Briton who strangled wife in his sleep walks free

Prosecution accepts argument that Brian Thomas, 59, suffered sleep
disorder and had no control over his body during attack.

London ­
Reuters Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 9:21AM EST Last updated on Friday,
Nov. 20, 2009 1:50PM EST

A Briton who strangled his wife during a
nightmare because he believed he was attacking an intruder, walked free from
court on Friday after prosecutors withdrew their case against him.

Brian
Thomas, 59, of Neath in South Wales, killed his wife Christine, 57, while they
were on holiday in July last year.

Prosecutors had accepted that Thomas
had a sleep disorder and so had no control over his body when he attacked his

wife of 40 years while they were both asleep.

“I must emphasize that the
circumstances of this case are almost unique in the UK and there have been fewer
than 50 instances recorded worldwide,” said Iwan Jenkins, Chief Crown Prosecutor
for Dyfed Powys.

Mr. Thomas admitted being responsible but instead of

charging him with murder or manslaughter, prosecutors had sought a special
verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity, the Press Association reported.

“The consequences of such a finding would have meant Mr. Thomas’s
detention in a psychiatric hospital, but it is now clear that the psychiatrists
feel that that would serve no useful purpose,” Mr. Jenkins said.

Swansea
Crown Court heard Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the couple, who
slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical
experts said the sudden withdrawal of the drugs could have led to him having
very vivid dreams.

The court was told the couple had been asleep in
their camper van in a pub car park when they were disturbed by youths in cars
performing wheel spins and so moved elsewhere.

However, Mr. Thomas then
had a dream one of the youths had broken into the van and later woke to find
himself next to his wife‘s body, at which point he called the police.

High Court Judge Justice Davis told Mr. Thomas, who had been in custody
since January, that in the eyes of the law he bore no responsibility for what he
had done and said he was a “decent man and devoted husband”.

Mr.
Thomas’s brother Raymond Thomas said the death and court case had been very
distressing.

“They were a loving couple and always like that together,”
he said. “He has always been a loving husband and a family man. This was a
tragic, tragic episode and we are all very emotional.”

 1,616 total views,  1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Man Found Not Guilty of Killing Wife While Asleep

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read:  “Swansea Crown Court heard
Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the
couple, who slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical experts said the sudden withdrawal of

the drugs could have led to him having very vivid dreams.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/briton-who-strangled-wife-in-his-sleep-walks-free/article1371102/

Briton who strangled wife in his sleep walks free

Prosecution accepts argument that Brian Thomas, 59, suffered sleep
disorder and had no control over his body during attack.

London ­
Reuters Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 9:21AM EST Last updated on Friday,
Nov. 20, 2009 1:50PM EST

A Briton who strangled his wife during a
nightmare because he believed he was attacking an intruder, walked free from
court on Friday after prosecutors withdrew their case against him.

Brian
Thomas, 59, of Neath in South Wales, killed his wife Christine, 57, while they
were on holiday in July last year.

Prosecutors had accepted that Thomas
had a sleep disorder and so had no control over his body when he attacked his

wife of 40 years while they were both asleep.

“I must emphasize that the
circumstances of this case are almost unique in the UK and there have been fewer
than 50 instances recorded worldwide,” said Iwan Jenkins, Chief Crown Prosecutor
for Dyfed Powys.

Mr. Thomas admitted being responsible but instead of

charging him with murder or manslaughter, prosecutors had sought a special
verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity, the Press Association reported.

“The consequences of such a finding would have meant Mr. Thomas’s
detention in a psychiatric hospital, but it is now clear that the psychiatrists
feel that that would serve no useful purpose,” Mr. Jenkins said.

Swansea
Crown Court heard Mr. Thomas regularly took anti-depressant drugs which made him
impotent, and he had stopped doing so before the holiday as the couple, who
slept in separate bedrooms at home, wanted to be “intimate”.

Medical
experts said the sudden withdrawal of the drugs could have led to him having
very vivid dreams.

The court was told the couple had been asleep in
their camper van in a pub car park when they were disturbed by youths in cars
performing wheel spins and so moved elsewhere.

However, Mr. Thomas then
had a dream one of the youths had broken into the van and later woke to find
himself next to his wife‘s body, at which point he called the police.

High Court Judge Justice Davis told Mr. Thomas, who had been in custody
since January, that in the eyes of the law he bore no responsibility for what he
had done and said he was a “decent man and devoted husband”.

Mr.
Thomas’s brother Raymond Thomas said the death and court case had been very
distressing.

“They were a loving couple and always like that together,”
he said. “He has always been a loving husband and a family man. This was a
tragic, tragic episode and we are all very emotional.”

 2,125 total views