ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN KILLERS: Suicide: Woman: England

Paragraph 11 reads:  “A post-mortem examination also
found a mixture of other painkillers and anti-depressants
in therapeutic rather than fatal amounts, but they could have worked
to enhance the effect of the pills.”

http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/s/2065818_grieving_nurse_had_spoken_of_suicide

Grieving nurse had spoken of suicide

February 15,
2010

A nurse who was found dead on her sofa had taken an overdose of her
daughter’s painkillers, an inquest heard.

Lindsay Davies, 50, was
discovered by her 22-year-old daughter at the family home in Southcote on August
26.

She had just finished a 10-day stint of night shifts at the Duchess
of Kent House in West Reading and the inquest heard it was thought she decided
to have a few drinks and fall asleep on the sofa.

Her husband Ian, known
as Terry, woke to the sound of her falling off the sofa at 2am and went
downstairs to pick her up and put her back on the settee at their home in
Worcester Close.

Giving evidence at the inquest on Tuesday, Mr Davies
said that he had left for work at around 6.30am and his wife was still snoring
soundly on the sofa. He said: “She had just finished night shifts and was
exhausted. It was not unusual for her to have a few drinks and relax when she
knew she didn’t have to go to work the next day.

“She had mentioned a few
things about taking her life but it was soon after her mother died and I just
thought it was normal to talk like that. I didn’t think she would actually do
anything, especially not where her family would find her.”

Mrs Davies,
who had a history of depression, had discussed taking her life with her daughter
but had said she would walk into the sea until she drowned and take her beloved
dog Charlie with her.

Her husband found a number of empty pill packets in
the house and some food bags of ham that had been laced with pills. But the dog,
who had been sleeping next to her, showed no signs of
poisoning.

Berkshire coroner Peter Bedford said that Mrs Davies had pills
in her stomach containing a painkiller that was prescribed to her daughter who
also suffered depression.

The pills were a potentially fatal
dose.

A post-mortem examination also found a mixture of other painkillers
and anti-depressants in therapeutic rather than fatal amounts, but they could
have worked to enhance the effect of the pills.

Recording an open
verdict, Mr Bedford said: “There is not enough evidence to allow me to reach a
clear conclusion.

“There is no suicide note, there is only one drug that
she overdosed in her body when you expect someone to try and take all the pills
you could get your hands on, and the fact she had said she would not do it at
home where her daughter would find her.

“There is doubt for me
there.”

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DEPRESSION MED: Well-Known Businessman, 52, Dies in Fall Down Stairs: UK

Paragraph one reads:  “A wellknown Suffolk businessman
fell to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed
after the collapse of his company, an inquest heard.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the
medication her husband was taking before his death had
made him  ‘
dozy’.”

http://www.eadt.co.uk/content/eadt/news/story.aspx?brand=EADOnline&category=News&tBrand=EADOnline&tCategory=xDefault&itemid=IPED17%20Feb%202010%2023%3A34%3A21%3A990

Businessman‘s stairs fall death remains a mystery

LAURENCE CAWLEY

Last
updated: 2/18/2010 11:56:00 AM

A WELLKNOWN Suffolk businessman fell
to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed after the collapse of his
company, an inquest heard.

Clive Thomas, 52, the former managing director
of Anglia Recruitment Group, was reported dead by his wife Jan at their home in

Coddenham Road, Needham Market, in May last year after she found him lying at
the bottom of the stairs.

During an inquest held in Bury St Edmunds
yesterday, it emerged the businessman, who was also a past chairman of the
Suffolk branch of the Institute of Directors and raised tens of thousands of
pounds for a range of charities, had suffered “severe” depression after his firm
went into liquidation.

It was heard that two separate post mortem
examinations to determine the cause of death had proved
inconclusive.

Chief Inspector Nick Bennett said Mr Thomas had suffered a
“nasty injury” to the back of his head during the fall but this had not caused
his death.

He said during the police investigation it emerged Mr Thomas
had endured “quite a severe episode of stress” when his business went into
liquidation earlier in the year for which he was prescribed
medication.

Ch Insp Bennett told how toxicology tests revealed Mr Thomas,
who had an enlarged heart, had consumed alcohol prior to his death and would
have been “unsteady on his feet” at the time of fall.

He also said foul
play had been ruled out.

Greater Suffolk Coroner Dr Peter Dean attributed
cause of death to “postural asphyxiation”, which meant Mr Thomas was unable to
breathe because of the way he was lying at the foot of the stairs.

“We
are not exactly sure how the fall actually occurred,” he said before recording a
narrative verdict that Mr Thomas had died from consequences of a fall down the

stairs.

After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the medication
her husband was taking before his death had made him “dozy”.

Mr Thomas’s mother Cathy Meadows added: “We still don’t know
what happened. There are lots of questions in my mind – but what can you do?”
she asked. “He did lots of things for charities. I am very proud of him. He was
such a good and kindly man and he was always trying to help other people. I
still really cannot believe he has gone. He was such a lovely son to me. I just
can’t believe it – it was such a shock. I just can’t get over this – he was my
only son.”

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PROZAC: Soldier Stabs to death Two Fellow Soldiers: Iraq/New York

Paragraphs 5 through 8 read:  “Investigators found the
23-year old’s body and along with the body of 20-year old Waide James of Port
St. John in Brevard County in their apartment just outside Ft. Drum in New York.
The two failed to report for duty on base.

Police say the Army Specialists had been stabbed to death.

New York

authorities tracked their other roommate, military police officer Joshua
Hunter,
to Ohio.

“Hunter, 20, was expected to be arraigned on
second-degree murder charges Friday morning, three days after the bodies
of James and Valbuena were found in their apartment just outside Fort Drum,
a
bout 140 miles northwest of Albany. Hunter and the two victims served
in Iraq at the same time in the same battalion.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “‘He was a gunner and he was active,’  says his father, Jim
Hunter.  ‘He said he saw some things he couldn’t get out of his mind. I
know he was seeing a therapist and taking

Prozac.”

http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2009/dec/04/slain-port-st-lucie-soldier-recalled-loving-person/

Slain Port St. Lucie soldier recalled as ‘loving person’ who put others
first

  • BY CAROLYN SCOFIELD WPTV NewsChannel 5
  • Posted December 4, 2009 at 6:18 a.m.

PORT ST. LUCIE ­ Nicole
Aviles will always remember his smile.

Diego Valbuena, a 2006 St. Lucie
West Centennial graduate, had a big grin and knew how to make his younger cousin
laugh.

“He was like the life of the party,” says Nicole Aviles. “He
always had a big grin on his face.”

There’s not a lot of laughter in the
family right now as they prepare for the funeral of the Port St. Lucie
resident.

Investigators found the 23-year old’s body and along with the
body of 20-year old Waide James of Port St. John in Brevard County in their
apartment just outside Ft. Drum in New York. The two failed to report for duty
on base.

Police say the Army Specialists had been stabbed to

death.

New York authorities tracked their other roommate, military police
officer Joshua Hunter, to Ohio.

Hunter, 20, was expected to be arraigned
on second-degree murder charges Friday morning, three days after the bodies of
James and Valbuena were found in their apartment just outside Fort Drum, about
140 miles northwest of Albany. Hunter and the two victims served in Iraq at the
same time in the same battalion.

They all were based at the wind-swept
Army post near the Canadian border, home of the much-deployed 10th Mountain
Division, and shared an off-base apartment.

Investigators have not
released a motive, but Hunter’s family says he served 15 months in Iraq and came
back scarred.

Relatives of Hunter said Thursday that he told them he saw
his best friend “blown to pieces” in Iraq and came back a changed man: abusive,
violent, sleepless, edgy and plagued by flashbacks.

“He was a gunner and
he was active,” says his father, Jim Hunter. “He said he saw some things he
couldn’t get out of his mind. I know he was seeing a therapist and taking

Prozac.”

Hunter’s wife, Emily Hunter, told The Associated Press in a
phone interview that her husband was outgoing before he went to war, but when he
returned stateside, he was an emotional wreck.

“He’d just burst into
tears; spouts of anger or sadness,” she said. “There’d be one emotion but it
would be really deep, just extremely happy or extremely sad. His emotions were
always on the rocks.”

“He’d take his rage out on the wall, or throw
something,” she said.

While he wasn’t violent toward his buddies, he was
toward her, she said, adding that she went to the hospital a couple of times for
treatment of an injured arm and thumb.

She said she moved out two weeks
ago because of his violence and is pursuing a divorce.

Valbuena also
served 15 months in Iraq. His family says he loved his country and excelled in
the Army.

He earned the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal
and Iraq Campaign Medal among other awards.

More important than the
medals was his love of family.

“A guy like him is like, one in a trillion
basically,” says Aviles. “He was just such a loving person, like he always put
others in front of himself.”

Sergio Valbuena said his brother was a good
man.

“He’s a pretty good boy, a pretty good kid,” he said. “He was loved
by everybody. He was a very good brother, a very good son.

“He was always
a problem-solver. He loved this country. That’s the reason he joined the
military.”

In September, James and Valbuena graduated from Fort Drum’s
Warrior Leaders Course, which teaches skills required to lead, train, fight and
accomplish the mission as noncommissioned officers. The two and Hunter all
listed each other as friends on their MySpace pages.

Valbuena wrote on
his MySpace page that he was born in Bogota, Colombia, and had joined the
military in August 2008.

James and Valbuena served as motor transport
operators with the Headquarters Battalion of the 10th Mountain Division,
according to Fort Drum’s public affairs office.

James arrived at Fort
Drum in July 2007, while Valbuena joined in August 2007 and came to Fort Drum in
January. Both have received awards and decorations including the Army
Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraq

Campaign Medal and overseas service ribbon.

James’ grandparents, who live
in Port St. John, described him as an avid outdoorsman who loved
fishing.

James lived in Brevard County for three years before joining the
Army in March 2007. He arrived in Fort Drum in July of that year.

“He
returned from his first tour of Iraq about seven months ago,” said his
grandfather, Chuck Mills. “If he could go fishing every hour of the day, he
would. He loved four-wheeling, being out in the mud.”

Valbuena’s family
is making arrangements to hold his funeral in Port St. Lucie.

Staff
writer Eric Pfahler, Kaustuv Basu of Florida Today and The Associated Press
contributed to this report.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Son Beats Mother: Drives Car into Abutment: CAN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from
antidepressants can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over months
or years depending on length of use, under the supervision of a qualified
and experienced specialist, if available.

Withdrawal is often more severe than the
original symptoms or problems.
Refer to
CD on safe withdrawal for guidelines “Help! I Can‘t Get Off My

Antidepressant!”

Paragraph 11 reads:  “According to an agreed statement,
Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told police that his son never had a good
relationship with his mother, suffers from severe depression and
doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/pleads+guilty+attacking+mother/2295992/story.html

Man, 28, pleads guilty to attacking his mother

Woman told police she feared for her life

By Andrew Seymour,
The Ottawa CitizenDecember 3, 2009

OTTAWA ­ The 28-year-old son of a
former high tech executive has pleaded guilty to assault causing bodily harm,
for grabbing his mother by the neck, smashing her head on the floor, covering
her nose and mouth to prevent her from breathing and throwing her down a flight
of stairs.

Roman Osadca admitted he was angry at his mother Elizabeth
Osadca on Oct. 7, 2008 after learning his ex-girlfriend had married. So he
charged toward his mother and tossed her on the floor, repeatedly punching and
shaking her head from side to side before placing both hands over her nose and
mouth.

When his mother ­ who described seeing stars and began losing
consciousness ­ fought back by kicking and punching him, he threw her down
the basement stairs.

According to an agreed statement of facts, Elizabeth
Osadca lay dazed at the bottom of the stairs for a few minutes before being able
to quietly climb the stairs and then run to a neighbour’s house to call
police.

Roman Osadca, who had already fled the home in a car, eventually
crashed into a light standard near the corner of Carling Avenue and Moodie
Drive. The light pole fell and hit another car.

Osadca ended up in the
same emergency ward at the Queensway-Carleton hospital as his mother, who had
suffered a cut to the back of her head, a bruised and swollen eye as well as a
red, swollen bump and small cigarette burn to her forehead.

Elizabeth
Osadca ­ who court heard Wednesday doesn’t want her son to go to jail ­
told police she was fearful for her life and believed that her son was going to
kill her.

Following his arrest, Osadca admitted attacking his mother,
telling police he “should have stopped after the first punch,” but never
intended to kill her.

The day of the attack, Roman Osadca had learned his
ex-girlfriend had married a man from the Dominican Republic. Osadca’s mother had
discovered the information and told the woman to tell her son about the new
relationship ­ and he blamed her for what happened.

Police went to
Elizabeth Osadca’s house afterward and found a large hole in the kitchen wall as
well as a knife planted in the wall of the stairs leading to the basement.

According to an agreed statement, Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told
police that his son never had a good relationship with his mother, suffers from
severe depression and doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.

Danny
Osadca is the founder of the Osadca Group, a Nepean consulting group. He is also
a former chief executive of Med Eng Systems.

Calling the attack a “once
in a lifetime situation,” Roman Osadca’s lawyer Rod Sellar said his “extremely
remorseful” client ­ who apologized in court for his actions ­ is
receiving treatment for depression. Osadca, who has also pleaded guilty to
dangerous driving, should receive a conditional sentence, Sellar argued. But
assistant Crown attorney Shawn Eagles argued a six-month jail term was more
appropriate given the prolonged nature of the “vicious attack” and the “profound
breach of trust” in a child’s attacking his own mother.

Sentencing is set
for Dec. 7.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa
Citizen

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide: Soldier: Iraq/Virginia

Paragraph 11 reads:  “Starr attempted suicide last
summer. Medication and counseling followed. He returned to work a month later.”

Paragraph 16
reads: “Scott had shot himself hours earlier, at home in Virginia Beach.
He died within a few miles of base – yet word of his death came
to Greene from someone thousands of miles away.”

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/09/walk-brings-light-dark-subject-suicide-military

Walk brings light to dark subject of suicide in the
military

Posted to: Military

The Virginian-Pilot
© September 11, 2009

Jon Greene
knows  he might choke up when he reads aloud a certain name Saturday at
Mount Trashmore.

He lost Scott Alan Starr, a friend and colleague, to
suicide in August 2008. Greene was the commander of the Naval Surface Warfare
Center at Dam Neck; Starr worked closely with him.

Greene and other
volunteers will read the names of more than 100 people who took their own lives
in the past year as part of the Out of the Darkness Community Walk.

The
walk, in its fourth year, brings together scores of people – more than 900 have
registered so far – and is one of the largest of its kind in the United States.
It’s sponsored by the Hampton Roads Survivors of Suicide Support
Group.

Some walk in memory of a friend or loved one. Others come because
they know what it’s like to suffer from depression.

“I can’t save Scott,
but I think there are lots and lots of folks in the military with lots and lots
to offer the world… who don’t realize that depression can be treated,” Greene
said.

Diagnosable depression is a factor in 90 percent of all suicides,
according to Chris Gilchrist, a Chesapeake social worker and one of the event’s
organizers.

Starr was the model Navy chief petty officer, Greene said:
strong, intelligent, well-respected, caring. A father figure to hundreds of
young sailors.

He first worked for Greene as senior enlisted adviser at
the surface warfare center. After retiring in 2007, Starr returned to Dam Neck
as a civilian employee.

“He was very proud,” Greene said. “And very
private.”

Starr attempted suicide last summer. Medication and counseling
followed. He returned to work a month later.

When Greene checked on him,
Starr’s response was always the same: “I’m doing great,” he would
say.

“He was the master chief. He was in charge; he was in control. There
were no cracks in his facade,” Greene said.

Greene set up automatic
reminders on his computer so he wouldn’t forget to check in with Starr. One of
them popped up on Aug. 17. But the day got busy, and Greene didn’t get to
it.

In his office early the next morning, Greene’s phone rang. It was a
friend of Starr’s calling from Iraq.

Scott had shot himself hours
earlier, at home in Virginia Beach. He died within a few miles of base – yet
word of his death came to Greene from someone thousands of miles away.

“I
really didn’t believe it,” Greene said in a recent interview, pausing and
looking up at the ceiling, trying to remember the moment. “It was absolutely
surreal.”

After getting the news, Greene shifted into “commanding officer
mode.” There were arrangements to deal with, colleagues to tell, a memorial
service to plan. The rituals helped. But Greene was unsettled. He couldn’t help
feeling that the military standard of suffering without complaint might have
doomed his friend.

Gilchrist and Greene’s wife, also a social worker,
helped him understand that suicide is a medical matter, not a moral
one.

Gilchrist noted that suicide is a major medical issue – 32,000
people take their own lives annually, she said. It is the 11th leading cause of
the death in the United States.

After years of war, the military has
gotten better at teaching service members about post-traumatic stress disorder
and mental health.

Generals and admirals talk about the spike in suicides
and are trying to address it. Earlier this year, the Army ordered a massive
safety stand-down to reach out to soldiers. The Navy has its own program for
spreading the message that it’s OK to ask for help.

But Greene, who’s now
retired from the Navy, knows that rank-and-file sailors don’t always buy the
message mouthed by military brass at the Pentagon.

“There are a lot of
good things going on in the military. I think there’s a willingness to do
something,” Greene said. “But fundamentally, it comes to the
culture.”

And that culture is action-oriented, goal-driven and full of
people who think “I’ll just power through this. I can hack it,” he
said.

“There are a lot of folks in the military – including some
relatively senior folks – who still see suicide and depression as a shameful
choice. I think there needs to be recognition by a lot of folks, specifically
the leadership, that you can’t hack it. Sometimes you need a little
help.”

Starr expected himself to be perfect. “He felt he had to live at
this ideal, this standard he’d set for himself,” Greene said.

That’s part
of the reason Greene invited Gilchrist to talk about suicide with leaders at the
surface warfare center. And it’s part of the reason he put up a large sign on
base, publicizing Saturday’s walk.

“There are so many people worried
about the damage that will be done to their career if they get help from
military medicine,” Greene said.

He acknowledged that there are
obstacles, but even within the military’s constraints, there are resources, like
special hot lines for service members and their families where they can get
immediate help.

“People in the military are put in extremely stressful
and dangerous positions,” he said. “That’s not going to change, and we don’t
want it to change. It’s the responsibility of leadership to listen and beware
when their sailors are having trouble.”

Kate Wiltrout, (757) 446-2629,

kate.wiltrout@pilotonline.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: 20 Year Old Hangs Self – England

Paragraph 11 reads: “A doctor in Birmingham prescribed
Mr A’Court with anti-depressants on April 27,
which he had been
taking since April. He did not have a history of
mental health problems.”

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/4590785.Flackwell_Heath_student_hanged_himself/

Flackwell Heath student hanged himself

11:13am
Thursday 10th September 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

By Lawrence Dunhill
»

A POPULAR student from Flackwell Heath hanged himself after the
break-up with his girlfriend left him severely depressed, an inquest heard.

Alexander A’Court killed himself in the garage of his family home The
Beeches, Treadaway Road, on May 25.

Mr A’Court was a pupil at John
Hampden Grammar School
before going to the University of Birmingham to study
Geography.

More than 500 friends have joined a Facebook group dedicated
to him, which says “he was a great friend and will be missed by all.”

The identity of Mr A’Court’s ex-girlfriend was not revealed. The inquest
was shown a “suicide letter” which Mr A’Court had sent to her, but this it was
not read out.

The 20yearold had been unfaithful to the girlfriend, who
ended their relationship on March 15, coroner Richard Hulett told the inquest at
Amersham Law Courts yesterday.

His father Stephen A’Court had to cut his
son down from the roof of the garage. He told the inquest: “Alex was a long way
from his problems in Birmingham, but in this electronic age of Facebook and
mobile phones he was never able to separate himself from those problems.”
Mobile phone records show that Mr A’Court telephoned his ex-girlfriend at
1.03pm. It was estimated that he died soon after this.

The inquest heard
that Mr A’Court had seemed “positive” that morning and was planning a holiday
before sharing some “light-hearted banter” with his brother Sam at around
12.45pm.

Stephen A’Court said he became concerned about his son’s mental
health after the break-up of his relationship and encouraged him to seek medical
help.

A doctor in Birmingham prescribed Mr A’Court with anti-depressants
on April 27, which he had been taking since April. He did not have a history of
mental health problems.

Mr A’Court was referred to a senior professor on
May 14 but was diagnosed as a “low suicide risk”.

Mr Hulett told the
inquest: “The relationship became the be all and end all for Alex. He rapidly
deteriorated into depression and severe mood swings.

“It is dreadful and
tragic that a 20yearold with such obvious prospects has chosen to take his
life quite suddenly.”

He found that Mr A’Court had taken his own life.

Ashleigh Barton from London wrote on the Facebook page: “You were such a
lovely guy and so loved by all. I don’t think it will ever sink in and I’ll
never get my head around why. I just hope you’re happier now than you were when
you were still here.”

Tom Bowers, who also went to John Hampden Grammar,
wrote: “I’ll never forget the way you went out of your way to help me fit in
when I first started at Tesco, it meant so much and always will. You were always
such a laugh and brilliant at putting a smile on anyone’s face.”

1,266 total views, 1 views today

DEPRESSION MED: ANOTHER MILITARY SUICIDE!!: IRAQ/VIRGINIA

Paragraph 11 reads:  “Starr attempted suicide last
summer. Medication and counseling followed. He returned to work a month later.”

Paragraph 16
reads: “Scott had shot himself hours earlier, at home in Virginia Beach.
He died within a few miles of base – yet word of his death came
to Greene from someone thousands of miles away.”

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/09/walk-brings-light-dark-subject-suicidemilitary

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/09/walk-brings-light-dark-subject-suicidemilitary

Walk brings light to dark subject of suicide in the
military

Posted to: Military

The Virginian-Pilot
© September 11, 2009

Jon Greene
knows  he might choke up when he reads aloud a certain name Saturday at
Mount Trashmore.

He lost Scott Alan Starr, a friend and colleague, to
suicide in August 2008. Greene was the commander of the Naval Surface Warfare
Center at Dam Neck; Starr worked closely with him.

Greene and other
volunteers will read the names of more than 100 people who took their own lives
in the past year as part of the Out of the Darkness Community Walk.

The
walk, in its fourth year, brings together scores of people – more than 900 have
registered so far – and is one of the largest of its kind in the United States.
It’s sponsored by the Hampton Roads Survivors of Suicide Support
Group.

Some walk in memory of a friend or loved one. Others come because
they know what it’s like to suffer from depression.

“I can’t save Scott,
but I think there are lots and lots of folks in the military with lots and lots
to offer the world… who don’t realize that depression can be treated,” Greene
said.

Diagnosable depression is a factor in 90 percent of all suicides,
according to Chris Gilchrist, a Chesapeake social worker and one of the event’s
organizers.

Starr was the model Navy chief petty officer, Greene said:
strong, intelligent, well-respected, caring. A father figure to hundreds of
young sailors.

He first worked for Greene as senior enlisted adviser at
the surface warfare center. After retiring in 2007, Starr returned to Dam Neck
as a civilian employee.

“He was very proud,” Greene said. “And very
private.”

Starr attempted suicide last summer. Medication and counseling
followed. He returned to work a month later.

When Greene checked on him,
Starr’s response was always the same: “I’m doing great,” he would
say.

“He was the master chief. He was in charge; he was in control. There
were no cracks in his facade,” Greene said.

Greene set up automatic
reminders on his computer so he wouldn’t forget to check in with Starr. One of
them popped up on Aug. 17. But the day got busy, and Greene didn’t get to
it.

In his office early the next morning, Greene’s phone rang. It was a
friend of Starr’s calling from Iraq.

Scott had shot himself hours
earlier, at home in Virginia Beach. He died within a few miles of base – yet
word of his death came to Greene from someone thousands of miles away.

“I
really didn’t believe it,” Greene said in a recent interview, pausing and
looking up at the ceiling, trying to remember the moment. “It was absolutely
surreal.”

After getting the news, Greene shifted into “commanding officer
mode.” There were arrangements to deal with, colleagues to tell, a memorial
service to plan. The rituals helped. But Greene was unsettled. He couldn’t help
feeling that the military standard of suffering without complaint might have
doomed his friend.

Gilchrist and Greene’s wife, also a social worker,
helped him understand that suicide is a medical matter, not a moral
one.

Gilchrist noted that suicide is a major medical issue – 32,000
people take their own lives annually, she said. It is the 11th leading cause of
the death in the United States.

After years of war, the military has
gotten better at teaching service members about post-traumatic stress disorder
and mental health.

Generals and admirals talk about the spike in suicides
and are trying to address it. Earlier this year, the Army ordered a massive
safety stand-down to reach out to soldiers. The Navy has its own program for
spreading the message that it’s OK to ask for help.

But Greene, who’s now
retired from the Navy, knows that rank-and-file sailors don’t always buy the
message mouthed by military brass at the Pentagon.

“There are a lot of
good things going on in the military. I think there’s a willingness to do
something,” Greene said. “But fundamentally, it comes to the
culture.”

And that culture is action-oriented, goal-driven and full of
people who think “I’ll just power through this. I can hack it,” he
said.

“There are a lot of folks in the military – including some
relatively senior folks – who still see suicide and depression as a shameful
choice. I think there needs to be recognition by a lot of folks, specifically
the leadership, that you can’t hack it. Sometimes you need a little
help.”

Starr expected himself to be perfect. “He felt he had to live at
this ideal, this standard he’d set for himself,” Greene said.

That’s part
of the reason Greene invited Gilchrist to talk about suicide with leaders at the
surface warfare center. And it’s part of the reason he put up a large sign on
base, publicizing Saturday’s walk.

“There are so many people worried
about the damage that will be done to their career if they get help from

military medicine,” Greene said.

He acknowledged that there are
obstacles, but even within the military‘s constraints, there are resources, like
special hot lines for service members and their families where they can get
immediate help.

“People in the military are put in extremely stressful
and dangerous positions,” he said. “That’s not going to change, and we don’t
want it to change. It’s the responsibility of leadership to listen and beware
when their sailors are having trouble.”

Kate Wiltrout, (757) 446-2629,
kate.wiltrout@pilotonline.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 20 YEAR OLD HANGS SELF: NO HISTORY OF MENTAL ILLNESS: UK

Paragraph 11 reads: “A doctor in Birmingham prescribed Mr A’Court with anti-depressants on April 27,which he had been taking since April. He did not have a history of mental health problems.”

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/4590785.Flackwell_Heath_student_hanged_himself/

Flackwell Heath student hanged himself

11:13am Thursday 10th September 2009

By Lawrence Dunhill »

A POPULAR student from Flackwell Heath hanged himself after the break-up with his girlfriend left him severely depressed, an inquest heard.

Alexander A’Court killed himself in the garage of his family home The Beeches, Treadaway Road, on May 25.

Mr A’Court was a pupil at John Hampden Grammar School before going to the University of Birmingham to study Geography.

More than 500 friends have joined a Facebook group dedicated to him, which says “he was a great friend and will be missed by all.”

The identity of Mr A’Court’s ex-girlfriend was not revealed. The inquest was shown a “suicide letter” which Mr A’Court had sent to her, but this it was not read out.

The 20-year-old had been unfaithful to the girlfriend, who ended their relationship on March 15, coroner Richard Hulett told the inquest at Amersham Law Courts yesterday.

His father Stephen A’Court had to cut his son down from the roof of the garage. He told the inquest: “Alex was a long way from his problems in Birmingham, but in this electronic age of Facebook and mobile phones he was never able to separate himself from those problems.”

Mobile phone records show that Mr A’Court telephoned his ex-girlfriend at 1.03pm. It was estimated that he died soon after this.

The inquest heard that Mr A’Court had seemed “positive” that morning and was planning a holiday before sharing some “light-hearted banter” with his brother Sam at around 12.45pm.

Stephen A’Court said he became concerned about his son’s mental health after the break-up of his relationship and encouraged him to seek medical help.

A doctor in Birmingham prescribed Mr A’Court with anti-depressants on April 27, which he had been taking since April. He did not have a history of mental health problems.

Mr A’Court was referred to a senior professor on May 14 but was diagnosed as a “low suicide risk”.

Mr Hulett told the inquest: “The relationship became the be all and end all for Alex. He rapidly deteriorated into depression and severe mood swings.

“It is dreadful and tragic that a 20-year-old with such obvious prospects has chosen to take his life quite suddenly.”

He found that Mr A’Court had taken his own life.

Ashleigh Barton from London wrote on the Facebook page: “You were such a lovely guy and so loved by all. I don’t think it will ever sink in and I’ll never get my head around why. I just hope you’re happier now than you were when you were still here.”

Tom Bowers, who also went to John Hampden Grammar, wrote: “I’ll never forget the way you went out of your way to help me fit in when I first started at Tesco, it meant so much and always will. You were always such a laugh and brilliant at putting a smile on anyone’s face.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Stealing: Woman: England

Paragraph 11 reads:  “He added,  ‘She was going through a lot of difficulties in her personal life at this time.
She was the victim of domestic violence and was on fairly strong anti-depressants’.

http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk/news/Woman-could-face-jail-after.5525458.jp

Woman could face jail after petrol pay fraud

Published Date: 05 August 2009
A 25-YEAR-OLD woman who breached a suspended prison sentence by claiming she couldn’t pay for petrol and then leaving false details at the Langney filling station will be sent to the crown court.
Joanna Marie Hunt appeared before the town’s magistrates court on Friday morning (July 31) and admitted two counts of fraud by false representation.
The court heard Hunt had been to the Esso petrol station, Langney Rise, on May 15 and 18 and filled her vehicle with £20 worth of petrol on both occasions.
She then claimed she was unable to pay and had to fill out a form stating she would return with the money within 24 hours.
On both occasions she gave a false address, number plate and mobile number on the form and on the second occasion she also put a false name.
When Hunt didn’t return to pay for the fuel the manager viewed the CCTV footage of the garage forecourt, took down her vehicle registration plate and phoned the police.
Hunt was later arrested in her vehicle, near Southend.
Prosecutor Heather Salvage told magistrates Hunt had since been back to the Esso station and paid back the money owed.
This offence put Hunt in breach of a three-month prison sentence which was suspended for 18 months and imposed on January 24, 2008.
In mitigation, Christos Christou said Hunt was at the very end of her suspended sentence.
He added, “She was going through a lot of difficulties in her personal life at this time.
“She was the victim of domestic violence and was on fairly strong anti-depressants.”
Magistrates ordered Hunt to be sentenced at the crown court and she will appear on a date to be fixed.
She was granted unconditional bail.

The full article contains 301 words and appears in n/a newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

  • Last Updated: 05 August 2009 12:05 PM
  • Source: n/a
  • Location: Eastbourne

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