ANTIDEPRESSANT & ALCOHOL: Chain Saw Attack: Ireland

Paragraph 10 reads: “Garda Noonan agreed with Mr Orange that Mulligan had
been on antidepressants at the time and the medication did not mix well
with the alcohol he had taken that night.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that
antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and can cause alcohol abuse. Also, the
liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,
thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/man-angry-at-juvenile-delinquency-chases-
youths-with-chainsaw-454896.html

Man angry at juvenile delinquency chases youths with chainsaw
22/04/2010 – 14:29:48

A man who was so frustrated with juvenile delinquency in his neighbourhood
that he tried to scare off some youths with a chainsaw has been ordered to
carry out work in the community in lieu of a jail sentence.

Patrick Mulligan (aged 50), a bus driver for children with special needs,
was still holding the running chainsaw in his driveway when gardaí arrived
and he waved it in the direction of garda Colin Noonan and two of his
colleagues.

Mulligan of Whitechurch Avenue, Ballyboden, pleaded guilty at Dublin
Circuit Criminal Court to possession of the chainsaw under the Firearms and
Offensive Weapons Act at his home on October 4, 2008. He had no previous
convictions.

Garda Noonan told Ms Una Tighe BL, prosecuting, that it took a short time
to convince Mulligan to put the tool down while his wife stood in the couple
’s doorway in a distressed state.

He said it was clear that the accused had been drinking. Mulligan told
gardaí that he had number of problems with some of the people in his
neighbourhood and was concerned for his property and the bus he drove for work.

He told gardaí later that his wife could not walk down their street
without “being hassled”. He said some youths had gathered outside his house that
night and were interfering with his bus and he had brought out the
chainsaw as tactic to scare them off.

He said he was shocked when gardaí arrived and that was why it took him
some time to put the tool down.

Garda Noonan agreed with Mr Garnet Orange BL, defending, that his client
was very apologetic to the gardaí during interview and co-operated with
their investigation.

He accepted that Mulligan’s wife had called the gardaí because she was
concerned for her husband before he further accepted that it had not been an
incident of “domestic violence”.

Garda Noonan agreed with Mr Orange that Mulligan had been on
antidepressants at the time and the medication did not mix well with the alcohol he had
taken that night.

Mr Orange told garda Noonan that his client wanted to express his
apologies for “any action that he engaged in that might have been perceived as a
threat to you and or your colleagues”.

He told judge Katherine Delahunt that there had been a problem with “
juvenile delinquency” in the area, involving “keying of cars and damage to both
vehicles and property”.

He said his client had been concerned for his and his family’s personal
safety and that of his property but added that Mulligan had “completely lost
the head and acted in an irrational manner”.

Mulligan had €500 in court to offer the gardaí as a token of his remorse
which garda Noonan said he would pass onto the Garda Benevolent Fund.

Judge Delahunt ordered Mulligan to carry out 100 hours community service
in lieu of a two-year sentence after telling him that had not been for the “
very fair evidence” of garda Noonan, and the manner in which he had met the
case, he would be going to jail.

“Garda Noonan has underplayed what must have been a very terrifying
experience for both him and his colleagues,” Judge Delahunt said before she noted
that she had also taken into account that Mulligan was 50 years old and
had not come to garda attention.

She said she was also taking into consideration the fact he may lose his
job due to his conviction and said that in itself would be “a very
significant penalty to suffer”.

PAXIL: Robbery: Fan Stole Famous Musician’s Guitar: England

Paragraphs 8 & 9 read:  Mr White said: “ ‘I’m
disgusted with the whole thing. There’s a victim here. I can’t reconcile myself
with the ­behaviour of that night’.”

“The court heard that Mr White,
who has no previous convictions, had been prescribed the antidepressant
Seroxat  [Paxil
] at the time of the incident. This combined with
alcohol had lessened his inhibitions,
­magistrates were
told.”

http://www.islingtontribune.com/news/2010/feb/hand-it-over-fan-who-stole-smiths-star%E2%80%99s-guitar-says-%E2%80%98i%E2%80%99m-sorry%E2%80%99

Hand it over! The fan who stole Smiths star’s guitar says, ‘I’m
sorry’

Man apologises to musician for snatching instrument after gig and keeping
it for 10 years

Published: 18 February 2010
by JOSH
LOEB

FOR 10 years, music fan Stephen White secretly held all the
answers to a musical mystery that  had mystified one of Britain’s most
revered guitarists.

Every time he looked at the shiny 1964 Cherry Red
Gibson SG guitar hidden in his flat, he gulped at the memory of how he had
stolen it from Johnny Marr, the musician who shot to fame with cult rock group
The Smiths.

On Tuesday, a decade after pinching the £30,000 instrument
backstage after a gig at the Scala nightclub in King’s Cross, Mr White, a
38-year-old carer, owned up to the theft in court.

He told Highbury
­Corner Magistrates’ Court that he was “disgusted” with himself.

Mr
White had been in the crowd packed inside the Scala to see Marr’s band Johnny
Marr and the Healers in 2000 on the night he walked off with the

guitar.

The court heard how he occasionally played it at home and at one
stage took it to the Tin Pan Alley guitar shops in Denmark Street, Bloomsbury,
to have it repaired after he ­accidentally stood on it.

Police
recovered the instrument after acting on a tip-off.

Mr White said: “I’m
disgusted with the whole thing. There’s a victim here. I can’t reconcile myself
with the ­behaviour of that night.”

The court heard that Mr White,
who has no previous convictions, had been prescribed the antidepressant Seroxat
at the time of the incident. This combined with alcohol had lessened his
inhibitions, ­magistrates were told.

After watching Marr perform, Mr
White went backstage to meet the musician and noticed a stage entrance was open.
On discovering the guitar unattended, he made what his counsel, Oliver Dean,
described as “a spur of the moment decision”. He picked up the guitar, walked
out with it via a fire escape and took it home in a taxi. It is believed the
guitar was found at Mr White’s Enfield home with the ticket from the gig in 2000
attached to it.

Marr, a renowned ­guitar collector famous for his
songwriting ­partnership with singer Morrissey, was reported at the time as
being “very upset” by the ­disappearance of the instrument and offered a
reward for information leading to its safe return.

Mr Dean said his
client felt extremely guilty about taking the guitar and had expressed a wish to
write and ­apologise to Mr Marr.

Police Constable Christopher Swain
said Mr Marr, who is ­currently on tour in New Zealand, was “ecstatic” about
the instrument’s return, adding: “He bears no malice towards the
defendant.”

PC Swain said: “The guitar did have a high sentimental
value to him. Initially he though he had been targeted by a professional thief
but when the details came to light he said he didn’t want the matter to go
further.”

Prosecutor Dorothy Thomas said that although the guitar would
normally have been worth around £6,000, it had been ­estimated as having a
value of £30,000 because of its association with Marr, who now plays with The
Cribs.

Mr White  was sentenced to 200 hours of community
­service. A spokes­man for Mr Marr said last night (Wed­nesday): “He
is obviously very happy to have his guitar

returned.”