ANTIDEPRESSANT-HYDROCODONE-ALCOHOL: Wrong-Way Crash: 4 Dead: Two Injured: TX

Paragraph 15 reads:  “After the wreck, DPS trooper Otto
Cabrera wrote in an arrest affidavit that he “could smell the strong odor of
metabolized alcohol from Looschen.” Looschen told Cabrera that he’d been
drinking and had taken antidepressants as well as
hydrocodone, according to the affidavit. Hydrocodone can be used as a cough
suppressant or a pain reliever.”

http://www.statesman.com/news/local/georgetown-man-pleads-guilty-in-fatal-2009-wreck-248382.html

Georgetown man pleads guilty in fatal 2009 wreck

Luke Anthony Looschen faces up to 100 years in prison for wrongway crash
on Texas 29.

By Miguel
Liscano

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Updated: 12:49 a.m.
Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010

Published: 8:54 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 17,
2010

A Georgetown man pleaded guilty Wednesday morning to four counts of
intoxication manslaughter and two counts of intoxication assault, admitting
guilt in causing a three-vehicle collision last summer that killed four people
and injured two others.

Luke Anthony Looschen, 48, entered his plea
before District Judge Burt Carnes in a Williamson County courtroom. A sentencing
hearing has been set for March 12 . He faces up to 100 years in
prison.

The guilty plea was not part of a plea agreement, Looschen’s
attorney Mike Davis and Williamson County Assistant District Attorney Robert
McCabe said in court.

“Mr. Looschen has acknowledged his guilt from the
get-go on this, and he felt the proper thing to do was to plead guilty,” Davis
said later.

Family members of those killed in the wreck wept in the
courtroom as Looschen entered his plea.

Looschen, who has been in the
Williamson County Jail with bail set at $600,000 since his arrest, showed no
visible emotion during the hearing.

“Did you use your truck as a deadly
weapon in this case?” McCabe asked.

“Yes, sir, I did,” Looschen
replied.

Because of that admission, Looschen must serve at least half of
the sentence he receives, and Carnes cannot sentence him to probation,
Williamson County District Attorney John Bradley said.

Looschen was
arrested Aug. 10 after troopers said he was driving a pickup east in a westbound
lane of Texas 29 near Jonah and collided head-on with a Jeep and a van carrying
seven people. The van slid down an embankment and struck a tree, according to a
Department of Public Safety crash report.

The driver of the Jeep was not
seriously injured, officials said.

In the van, Pete Mendez, 44, and Paula
Martinez, 38 , were pronounced dead at the scene, officials said. Two passengers
died later at University Medical Center Brackenridge: Crystal Martinez , the
16-year-old daughter of Paula Martinez and Clemente Martinez, the driver; and
Stephanie Valadez, 24, who was dating the couple’s son.

Valadez’s
daughter Tristan and son Jacob, who were 3 and 1, respectively, at the time of
the wreck, were treated at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple and
released.

Clemente Martinez was not seriously injured, officials
said.

After the wreck, DPS trooper Otto Cabrera wrote in an arrest
affidavit that he “could smell the strong odor of metabolized alcohol from
Looschen.” Looschen told Cabrera that he’d been drinking and had taken
antidepressants as well as hydrocodone, according to the affidavit. Hydrocodone

can be used as a cough suppressant or a pain reliever.

Blood test results
later revealed that Looschen’s blood alcohol content level was 0.16 , or twice
the legal limit of 0.08 , according to the DPS crash report. Looschen had been
in a previous one-vehicle accident on July 16 in Williamson County, which he
later discussed on his Facebook page. He said on the Web site that he had
totaled his truck and “sustained some scrapes, bruises and lacerations.” On Aug.
3, a few days before the fatal crash, he wrote on Facebook that he was getting a
replacement truck that day.

In 2006, Looschen was in a motorcycle
accident with his ex-wife, 43-year-old Shanan Looschen, in Georgetown, police
said.

Shanan Looschen was thrown from the motorcycle and died a day later
at Brackenridge, police said. Neither was wearing a helmet, police
said.

No charges were filed in either of the two earlier
wrecks.

mliscano@statesman.com;
246-1150

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PAXIL: Robbery: Fan Stole Famous Musician’s Guitar: England

Paragraphs 8 & 9 read:  Mr White said: “ ‘I’m
disgusted with the whole thing. There’s a victim here. I can’t reconcile myself
with the ­behaviour of that night’.”

“The court heard that Mr White,
who has no previous convictions, had been prescribed the antidepressant
Seroxat  [Paxil
] at the time of the incident. This combined with
alcohol had lessened his inhibitions,
­magistrates were
told.”

http://www.islingtontribune.com/news/2010/feb/hand-it-over-fan-who-stole-smiths-star%E2%80%99s-guitar-says-%E2%80%98i%E2%80%99m-sorry%E2%80%99

Hand it over! The fan who stole Smiths star’s guitar says, ‘I’m
sorry’

Man apologises to musician for snatching instrument after gig and keeping
it for 10 years

Published: 18 February 2010
by JOSH
LOEB

FOR 10 years, music fan Stephen White secretly held all the
answers to a musical mystery that  had mystified one of Britain’s most
revered guitarists.

Every time he looked at the shiny 1964 Cherry Red
Gibson SG guitar hidden in his flat, he gulped at the memory of how he had
stolen it from Johnny Marr, the musician who shot to fame with cult rock group
The Smiths.

On Tuesday, a decade after pinching the £30,000 instrument
backstage after a gig at the Scala nightclub in King’s Cross, Mr White, a
38-year-old carer, owned up to the theft in court.

He told Highbury
­Corner Magistrates’ Court that he was “disgusted” with himself.

Mr
White had been in the crowd packed inside the Scala to see Marr’s band Johnny
Marr and the Healers in 2000 on the night he walked off with the

guitar.

The court heard how he occasionally played it at home and at one
stage took it to the Tin Pan Alley guitar shops in Denmark Street, Bloomsbury,
to have it repaired after he ­accidentally stood on it.

Police
recovered the instrument after acting on a tip-off.

Mr White said: “I’m
disgusted with the whole thing. There’s a victim here. I can’t reconcile myself
with the ­behaviour of that night.”

The court heard that Mr White,
who has no previous convictions, had been prescribed the antidepressant Seroxat
at the time of the incident. This combined with alcohol had lessened his
inhibitions, ­magistrates were told.

After watching Marr perform, Mr
White went backstage to meet the musician and noticed a stage entrance was open.
On discovering the guitar unattended, he made what his counsel, Oliver Dean,
described as “a spur of the moment decision”. He picked up the guitar, walked
out with it via a fire escape and took it home in a taxi. It is believed the
guitar was found at Mr White’s Enfield home with the ticket from the gig in 2000
attached to it.

Marr, a renowned ­guitar collector famous for his
songwriting ­partnership with singer Morrissey, was reported at the time as
being “very upset” by the ­disappearance of the instrument and offered a
reward for information leading to its safe return.

Mr Dean said his
client felt extremely guilty about taking the guitar and had expressed a wish to
write and ­apologise to Mr Marr.

Police Constable Christopher Swain
said Mr Marr, who is ­currently on tour in New Zealand, was “ecstatic” about
the instrument’s return, adding: “He bears no malice towards the
defendant.”

PC Swain said: “The guitar did have a high sentimental
value to him. Initially he though he had been targeted by a professional thief
but when the details came to light he said he didn’t want the matter to go
further.”

Prosecutor Dorothy Thomas said that although the guitar would
normally have been worth around £6,000, it had been ­estimated as having a
value of £30,000 because of its association with Marr, who now plays with The
Cribs.

Mr White  was sentenced to 200 hours of community
­service. A spokes­man for Mr Marr said last night (Wed­nesday): “He
is obviously very happy to have his guitar

returned.”

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DEPRESSION MED: Well-Known Businessman, 52, Dies in Fall Down Stairs: UK

Paragraph one reads:  “A wellknown Suffolk businessman
fell to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed
after the collapse of his company, an inquest heard.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the
medication her husband was taking before his death had
made him  ‘
dozy’.”

http://www.eadt.co.uk/content/eadt/news/story.aspx?brand=EADOnline&category=News&tBrand=EADOnline&tCategory=xDefault&itemid=IPED17%20Feb%202010%2023%3A34%3A21%3A990

Businessman‘s stairs fall death remains a mystery

LAURENCE CAWLEY

Last
updated: 2/18/2010 11:56:00 AM

A WELLKNOWN Suffolk businessman fell
to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed after the collapse of his
company, an inquest heard.

Clive Thomas, 52, the former managing director
of Anglia Recruitment Group, was reported dead by his wife Jan at their home in

Coddenham Road, Needham Market, in May last year after she found him lying at
the bottom of the stairs.

During an inquest held in Bury St Edmunds
yesterday, it emerged the businessman, who was also a past chairman of the
Suffolk branch of the Institute of Directors and raised tens of thousands of
pounds for a range of charities, had suffered “severe” depression after his firm
went into liquidation.

It was heard that two separate post mortem
examinations to determine the cause of death had proved
inconclusive.

Chief Inspector Nick Bennett said Mr Thomas had suffered a
“nasty injury” to the back of his head during the fall but this had not caused
his death.

He said during the police investigation it emerged Mr Thomas
had endured “quite a severe episode of stress” when his business went into
liquidation earlier in the year for which he was prescribed
medication.

Ch Insp Bennett told how toxicology tests revealed Mr Thomas,
who had an enlarged heart, had consumed alcohol prior to his death and would
have been “unsteady on his feet” at the time of fall.

He also said foul
play had been ruled out.

Greater Suffolk Coroner Dr Peter Dean attributed
cause of death to “postural asphyxiation”, which meant Mr Thomas was unable to
breathe because of the way he was lying at the foot of the stairs.

“We
are not exactly sure how the fall actually occurred,” he said before recording a
narrative verdict that Mr Thomas had died from consequences of a fall down the

stairs.

After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the medication
her husband was taking before his death had made him “dozy”.

Mr Thomas’s mother Cathy Meadows added: “We still don’t know
what happened. There are lots of questions in my mind – but what can you do?”
she asked. “He did lots of things for charities. I am very proud of him. He was
such a good and kindly man and he was always trying to help other people. I
still really cannot believe he has gone. He was such a lovely son to me. I just
can’t believe it – it was such a shock. I just can’t get over this – he was my
only son.”

633 total views, no views today

SSRIs: Emotional Detachment: Personality Changes & Reduction in Positive…

Paragraph two reads:  “A recent study published in the
British Journal of Psychiatry found that the majority of
patients taking SSRIs experienced emotional detachment, feelings of
indifference, personality changes,
and a reduction in

positive and negative emotions.[1]”

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/716929

Physicians Are Talking About: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and
the Choice to Numb Out

Nancy R. Terry

Authors and
Disclosures

Posted: 02/18/2010

Selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitors (SSRIs), mainstays of psychopharmacology, effectively eliminate
suicidal ideation — not to mention feelings of exhilaration, caring, and
desire.

A recent study published in the British Journal of
Psychiatry
found that the majority of patients taking SSRIs experienced

emotional detachment, feelings of indifference, personality changes, and a
reduction in positive and negative emotions.[1]

Currently,
tens of millions of patients in the United States take SSRIs daily. However,
evidence pertaining to the long-term effects of these drugs is scant. “In a few
decades, as many as 15% of the world’s population might be on SSRIs,” comments a
psychiatrist. “Although the suicide rate might decrease, I wonder what the
long-term effect will be.”

The conjecture posited on Medscape’s Physician
Connect (MPC), an all-physician discussion board, launches a discussion about
the apparent choice in SSRI use — to be crippled by depression or functional
and emotionally numb.

MPC contributors commented that their anecdotal
experience aligns with that of the British study.

In several patients on
long-term SSRIs, I have noticed some subtle personality changes,” says a
psychiatrist. “Of course, there’s no way of ascertaining cause and effect
without a good, long-term study, but this is what I’ve observed: (1) SSRIs

decrease pain (irritability, depression) but also seem to increase the threshold
for what constitutes an exciting event (a person needs more novelty than
previously for the same effect); and (2) SSRIs increase apathy and have the
potential to decrease empathy.”

“It would be unrealistic,” adds another
psychiatrist, “to think that taking a medication which significantly impacts a
major neurotransmitter would not have, in some cases if not many, a significant
effect on a person’s personality, either short- or long-term.” The psychiatrist
comments that case studies documented in Peter Kramer’s book Listening to
Prozac
indicate that SSRIs strongly impact a patient’s feeling of “caring,”
which can affect the patient’s relationships with friends and family.

An
endocrinologist suggests that his colleagues view the film Numb, which
documents filmmaker Phil Lawrence’s struggle to stop taking the popular SSRI
Paxil. In the trailer for the film, Lawrence says, “I’m flatlined. This isn’t
me. This is me on Paxil®.”[2]

“These are the
wonder drugs of psychiatry,” argues a psychiatrist. “They continue to benefit
people over the long term, even at low doses. They help with anxiety, much more
robustly than with depression, but they help in depression too. If I had my way
Prozac®, Zoloft®, and Celexa® would be sold
over the counter.” The psychiatrist comments that the life-time prevalence of
depression is between 15% and 30%,[3] and most people remain
untreated for fear of persecution and judgment formation about their need to
take antidepressant drugs. Over-the-counter distribution, he reasons, would make

SSRIs more readily available to people who need them.

“I disagree about
the OTC [over-the-counter] issue,” replies Stephen Grcevich, MD, a child and
adolescent psychiatrist. “I think there are untoward effects of SSRIs that are
still poorly understood, such as the very small but statistically significant
risk of suicidal behavior in persons aged 25 and under. We also saw a subgroup
of kids who displayed significant disinhibition and indifference to academics in
a large, open-label, federally funded study looking at SSRI safety.” He comments
that he hopes to present the study data at the 2010 annual meeting of the
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP).

An internist
who frequently prescribes SSRIs, reports that she repeatedly experienced
suicidal thoughts while taking an SSRI for depression. “I have been placed by my
physician on Lexapro® 3 times. In each instance, my mood lifted and
crying decreased. I could sleep. In 3 days’ time, I started having thoughts that
came out of the blue, such as ‘I want to drive off this bridge.’ Stopping the
medication stopped the thoughts.” She says that she tells her patients about
this potential side effect, but no patient has related having a similar
response.

SSRIs and then SNRIs [serotonin noradrenaline reuptake
inhibitors] nearly killed me,” says an obstetrician/gynecologist. “They caused
narcolepsy, and I fell asleep and drove off the road.” He comments that his
level of apathy while taking the drugs was so extreme as to appear parkinsonian.
In my opinion as a patient, mild to moderate depression should be treated by
cognitive behavioral therapy, not meds.”

A surgeon comments that, in many
cases, SSRIs are given to patients who are only mildly depressed. “The drugs are
given as mood elevators,” he says. “We essentially are giving out the drug for
the same reason people self-medicate or abuse alcohol.”

“I do agree we
are pushed to start meds too early on mild cases sometimes,” says a family
medicine physician. “We must ask the tough questions of patients about suicidal
thoughts to determine the severity of their illness. Then start a multipronged
approach to treatment and not just write a script and send them out the
door.”

A neurosurgeon comments that clearly there are a number of
questions about SSRIs that need to be addressed:

  • Should we treat mild depression knowing the risks?
  • Are we educating patients about the possibility that they will experience
    apathy?
  • Are we increasing the risk for substance abuse in patients who attempt to
    counterbalance induced conditions of apathy and boredom?
  • Are the artificially high levels of serotonin caused by the use of SSRIs
    chronically changing the brain and making it impossible to withdraw from these
    drugs?


“I agree that higher doses and long-term use does blunt
emotions,” says a pediatrician. “I used Effexor® for about 7 years
and tried to wean off during that time, but at very low doses would redevelop
extreme sadness that resolved when I upped the dose.” He says that working with
his psychiatrist, he switched to Wellbutrin® and now experiences a
wider range of appropriate emotions. “However, if I did not have another option,
I would prefer Effexor® side effects over the chronic anxiety and
sadness I experienced for much of my life without it.”

The authors of the
British study reported a similar finding. Many participants in the study
considered whether they should stop taking their medication, but viewed the side
effects as preferable to the illness for which they were being
treated.

“And that is the problem, isn’t it?” comments an MPC
contributor. “We just don’t have meds that treat without some side
effects.”

The full discussion can be accessed at http://boards.medscape.com/forums/.29f65335

References

1,648 total views, 3 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Death: Possible Intentional Overdose: Texas

Paragraphs 11 through 14 read:  “He says when Moreno was
being arrested an officer
allowed him to go back into
his house to get a bottle of antidepressant pills.”

“The
chief says the bottle, which Moreno wasn’t allowed to handle, was filled on
Feb. 4 with 30 pills.”

“On that Sunday,
Feb 14, investigators say there was only one pill
left.”

“That’s why a toxicology report is being
done.”

http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/news/local/100216-deer-park-jail-death

Family Seeks Answers After Son Dies at Deer Park Jail

Updated: Tuesday, 16 Feb 2010, 9:52 AM CST
Published : Tuesday, 16 Feb
2010, 5:52 PM CST

HOUSTON – Roy Moreno is in pain. His 26-year-old son
went to jail Sunday for two traffic warrants, but Nicholas Moreno never walked
out of holding cell D223 in Deer Park.

On Sunday, Moreno was driving home
in Shore Acres. He’d been out with friends.

His father says a block away
from their house he hit this mailbox while trying to avoid neighborhood dogs.
Police were called but left because of shift change.

When the shore acres
officers arrived at Moreno’s house they realized the 26-year-old had traffic
warrants out of Deer Park.

He was eventually taken to the Deer Park
Police Department.

“He was booked in without incident and went to sleep
in the jail cell. They knew he was sleep because he was snoring loudly,” Chief
Gregory Grigg says.

According to the chief it was 12:50 a.m. when a
jailer realized Moreno’s snoring had stopped.

“They opened door and went
in and tried to shake him awake,” Chief Grigg says.

After CPR and a
defibrillator Moreno was gone. Now his father wants to know what happened to his
otherwise healthy son.

Chief Grigg has another concern.

He says
when Moreno was being arrested an officer allowed him to go back into his house
to get a bottle of antidepressant pills.

The chief says the bottle, which
Moreno wasn’t allowed to handle, was filled on Feb. 4 with 30 pills.

On
that Sunday, investigators say there was only one pill left.

That’s why a
toxicology report is being done.

In the meantime, Roy Moreno simply wants
to know what happened to the son he nurtured and raised for 26 years.

“He
loved his family, he loved his friends, I never thought this would happen to
us,” Moreno says.

725 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS & Anti-Anxiety Pills: Man Accidentally Takes an Overdose: UK

Last three paragraphs read:  “The 59-year-old suffered
from anxiety and depression since his teenage years and was taking
anti-depressants and antianxiety pills, the hearing was told.”

“Terrance Bird, a friend, told the inquest that Mr Smith sometimes
forgot how many pills he had taken.”

“East Lancashire Coroner
Richard Taylor concluded that Mr Smith did not mean to take his own life and
died accidentally on January 7 as a result of
taking two prescribed drugs.”

http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/burnleypendlerossendale/5012043.Rawtenstall_man_died_of_accidental_overdose_of_prescribed_medication/

Rawtenstall man died of accidental overdose of prescribed
medication

10:39am Wednesday 17th February 2010

A
ROSSENDALE man died accidentally after taking a lethal concoction of prescribed
medication, an inquest heard.

Geoffrey Smith, of Holland Avenue,
Rawtenstall, was found dead at his house after failing to measure his medication
properly, Burnley Coroner’s Court heard.

The 59-year-old suffered from

anxiety and depression since his teenage years and was taking anti-depressants
and antianxiety pills, the hearing was told.

Terrance Bird, a friend,
told the inquest that Mr Smith sometimes forgot how many pills he had taken.

East Lancashire Coroner Richard Taylor concluded that Mr Smith did not
mean to take his own life and died accidentally on January 7 as a result of
taking two prescribed drugs.

884 total views, 1 views today

Prof in AL Shooting Was On Meds After Killing Her Brother 20 Yrs Ago

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Knowing when she was placed on medication (before or after her

brother‘s shooting) and which kind of medication and how long she took it,
if she was still on it, etc., etc., etc. – her entire history of mind altering
medication use is ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL in understanding what has happened in this
case or any other case of bizarre violent behavior. This is a public safety
issue that needs to be made public in each and every one of these cases. This
type of transparency in these crimes is LONG overdue!

___________________________
Paragraph 31 reads:  “Amy stated that she was not aware
of any additional facts which could assist these officers in their investigation
into the death of her brother, and she reiterated adamantly that the discharge
had been accidental and that she was still having a very difficult time dealing
with what had occurred and was currently
under
medication with a doctor’s care.”

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,585823,00.html

RAW DATA: 1986 Police Report on Shooting Involving Alabama
Professor

Sunday, February 14, 2010 []

March
30, 1987

To: First Assistant District Attorney John P.
Kivlan

From: Trooper Brian L. Howe #1332 BLH

Subject: Accidental
Shooting of Seth Bishop, White Male,

D.O.B. 4/9/68 At 46 Hollis Avenue,
Braintree, Massachusetts on December 6, 1986.

Case: #
86-112-0910-0185

On December 6, 1986, this officer was directed by
Detective Lieutenant James Sharkey to conduct an investigation into the fatal

shooting of Seth Bishop at his residence of 46 Hollis Avenue in the Town of
Braintree.

This officer contacted Captain Theodore Buker of the Braintree
Police Department and was informed by Captain Buker that at approximately 1422
hours on December 6, 1986, the Braintree Police Department had responded to the
report of a shooting a 46 Hollis Avenue in their town.

Upon arriving at
the location, Officers Jordan and Murphy had observed the decedent lying on his
back on the floor in a pool of blood in the kitchen area, with a large chest
wound.

Paramedics responded to the scene and after administering
preliminary first aid, transported the victim to the Quincy City Hospital where
he was subsequently pronounced dead at 1506 hours, by Dr. Thomas Divinigracia.
Initial cause of death of a victim was reported to be a ruptured aorta as a
result of a gunshot wound to the chest.

Captain Buker stated that
preliminary investigation conducted by Officers Jordan and Murphy indicated that
the victim had been shot by his sister, Amy Bishop (age 19), and that apparent
cause of the gunshot discharge into the victim had been accidental in nature.
Captain Buker further stated that indications were that Amy Bishop had been
attempting to manipulate the shotgun and had subsequently brought the gun
downstairs in an attempt to gain assistance from her mother in disarming the
weapon.

During her attempt to disarm the weapon in the kitchen of her

residence, the weapon had apparently accidentally discharged, resulting in the
fatal wound inflicted upon her brother.

Captain Buker further stated that
at the time the discharge occurred, Judy Bishop, the mother of both the victim
and Amy, had been in the kitchen and had witnessed the entire incident. Judy
Bishop had indicated to the responding officers that the discharge had been
accidental in nature and that the discharge had occurred while Amy was

attempting to unload the weapon.

Captain Buker also stated that Amy
Bishop had fled the residence immediately upon discharging the weapon and had
subsequently been located by Braintree Officers and brought to the Braintree
Police Department for questioning.

Captain Buker stated that due to the
highly emotional state of Amy Bishop, it had generally been impossible to
question her while she was at the Braintree Police Department relative to the
circumstances of the firearm discharge, and that as a result of these facts, she
was thereupon released to the custody of her parents with further investigation
to follow at a future time.

This officer therefor determined that due to
the inability to question the witnesses at that time as a result of their highly
emotional state and their inability to recall specifically the facts relating to
this occurrence, as well as the fact that Judy Bishop stated that she had
witnessed the entire affair and the discharge had been accidental in nature, it

was determined that additional interviews would be conducted at a later time,
allowing the witnesses a sufficient time to stabilize their emotions.

On
December 6, 1986, an autopsy was conducted on Seth bishop at the Qyuincy City
Hospital by Dr. George Katsas with Dr. William Riddle in attendance. The autopsy
began at approximately 2000 hours with the cause of death having been determined
to be the result of a shotgun discharge to the left chest area.

It should
also be noted that a check of firearms identification cards at Braintree Police
Department indicated and F.I.D. card issued to Seth bishop, card #H590682, as
well as n F.I.D. card issued to Samuel Bishop father of SEth, card
#H590724.

Captain Buker had also indicated to this officer that numerous
photographs had been taken at the scene of the shooting as well as at the
autopsty coundcted on the victim.

The weapon which had been utilized in

the death of Seth Bishop had been secured by the Braintree Police Department for
firther processing by the State Police Ballistics
Laboratory.

Arrangements were subsequently made to conduct interviews of
all of the members of the Bishop family and thereupon, on December 17, 1986,
this officer, Captian Theodore Buker and Detective Michael Carey of the
Braintree Police Department procdeede to 46 Hollis Avenue in the Town of
Braintree.

Individually, Samuel, Judy, and Amy Bishop were interviewed by
these officers with the resulting statments taken.

Samuel Bishop stated
that he had not been in the residence at the time of the shooting, He said that
he had left the house at approximately 1130 hours to go shopping at the South
Shore Plaza. He stated that at the time he left the residence, his son Seth had
been washing his car, Amy was the house and his wife, Judy, was due to be home
at sometime between 1100 and 1200 hours. Samuel stated that he had a disagrrment
with Amy before he left about a comment that she made, and that she had gone to

her room prior to his departing. He stated that upon his return to the
residence, police and ambulance were at the house and that he was adivsed of the
situation relating to the shooting of his son.

When questioned as to the
actual possession of the shotgun within his residence, he stated that he had
bought the shotgun at Coleman’s Sporting Goods in Canton, approximately one year
previously, and that he and his son, Seth, had belonged to the Braintree Rifle
Club. He stated that the gun had been unloaded, on top of a trunk in a rifle
case in his upstairs bedroom also. He further stated that Amy had not been
trained in the use of the weapon and that the weapon had orginally been
purchased for family protection as a result of a previous housebreak at their
residence.

These officer then interviewed Judy Bishop, the mother of the
victim who stated that on the day of the shooting, she had left the house at
approximately 0700 hours and that ll other family members had been in the house
at the time. She stated that she returned to the residence to see if there was

anything for lunch, and that at this time, Seth was home and stated that he
would go to the store to pick up some food so that they could all have
lunch.

Judy further stated that Seth returned from the grocery store,
went into the livingroom and turned on television. She stated that he was on his
way into the kitchen when Amy came downstairs with the shotgun, and asked Judy
if she could help her unload the gun. Judy state that she told Amy not to point
the gun at anyone, and that Amy then turned, and in doing so, somehow discharged
the weapon which subsequently hit her son Seth who was walking into the kitchen
from the living room.

Judy stated that she screamed and theupon Amy ran
out of the house. Judy state that she then called the police and waited at the
front door fo the arrival of the police, but she further added that she knew
that Seth could not live as the result of the injury which he had
received.

When questioned relative to any prior discharges of the weapon
inside the residence on the day in question, Judy stated that she did not hear
any other shots fired, in particular, and shots fired in the upstairs bedroom,
but she believed that the house was realtively well soundproofed and that such a
discharge would not necessarily be hear on another floor of the
house.

Judy state that she did not feel that she had any knowledge of any
other relvant facts relating to the investigation to convey to these
officers.

These officers then conducted an interview with Amy Bishop who
stated that on the morning of the shooting, her mother had gone out and that her

father had gone shopping. Amy stated that she did not know where her brother was
during the day but thought that it would be a good idea if she learned how to
load the shotgun in the house. Amy stated that she was concerned for her own
safety on occasions as a result of the break which had previously occurred at
their home, and she often read and heard of stories about things that happened
when people break into houses and find other people inside.

Amy stated
that she got the gun from her parents’ room where she found it on the chest and
the bullets were on the bureau. She stated that she put the shells into the gun
and then tried to get them out but was unsuccessful in doing this even though
she attempted to unscrew the bottom casing of the gun. She stated that while she

was attempting to unload the weapon which was on her bed, it discharged into her
room, but that she is unsure as whether or not her bedroom door was open at the
time. She stated that she was beside her bed near the door at the time that the
gun discharged, but that she couldn’t specifically recall seeing anything coming
out of the gun.

Amy further stated that she does not recall putting any
additional bullets into the gun after it discharged, and that she then unscrewed
the bottom of the shaft in an attempt to empty the weapon, and when being unable
to empty the weapon this way, she stated that she then screwed the bottom of the
shaft back on.

Amy stated that she then heard her brother come into the
house downstairs and she went right downstairs to ask Seth to help her unload
the gun. She said apparently her mother had been in the kitchen for awhile and
that Amy went down the front set of stairs, through the dining room, to the door
by the kitchen. She stated that she asked her brother to unload the weapon
because she thought it might still be loaded and she added that her mother said
something to her but she does not specifically recall what it was.

Amy
said that she was carrying the gun pointed beside her leg, and that Seth told

her to point the gun up. Amy stated that Seth was walking across the kitchen
between Amy and her mother and that Amy had the gun in one hand and started to
raise it. Amy further stated that someone said something to her and she turned
and the gun went off. She stated that she remembered her brother saying, “Oh
God,” and her mother screaming, and that Amy though that she had ruined the
kitchen but was not aware of the fact that she had struck her brother with the
shotgun discharge.

Amy stated that she then immediately ran out the rear
door of the kitchen and thought that she had dropped the gun as she ran away.
She stated that at the time the gun went off, she was by the dining room door to
the kitchen. Amy also said that she does not recall putting on a jacket prior to
running out of the house or leaving the house with the gun and that she cannot
recall anything else until she subsequently saw her mother at the police
station.

Amy did tell these officers that her brother Seth had verbally
told her previously how to hold the gun but that she had always previously been
afraid of it. Amy concluded the investigation by saying that she had previously
made no attempt to cover up the hole in her bedroom wall which apparently,
according to her, was the result of the previous discharge in her

bedroom.

Amy stated that she was not aware of any additional facts which
could assist these officers in their investigation into the death of her
brother, and she reiterated adamantly that the discharge had been accidental and
that she was still having a very difficult time dealing with what had occurred
and was currently under medication with a doctor’s care.

As a result of
these foregoing facts, a meeting was conducted between this officer, Captain
Buker and Detective Carey. It was determined that due to the testimony of the
members of the Bishop family and, in particular, to the testimony of Judy Bishop
relevant to the facts concerning the death of Seth Bishop that no further
investigation into the death of Seth Bishop was warranted.

It was

therefore determined that the cause of death of Seth Bishop would be listed as
the accidental discharge of his sister, Amy Bishop, and that the investigation
would be concluded.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS ARE FAR FROM ALONE IN DANGERS! & BEWARE OF DRUG ADVERTIZING!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
The following article on drug advertising, “Side Effects Include Denial” is an
EXCELLENT article on how the public is brainwashed into using drugs without a
thought. This is how we have ended up on all of these new “Designer Drugs” that
seem to be more the norm in our society now than the abnormal. When I was
growing up someone who was ill was out of the ordinary. Most we well. Now it
seems the exact opposite with even the very young discussing their serious
disorders – things we never saw in children before.

Although our site has focused on antidepressants for many
years, that focus has nothing to do with lack of concern over a myriad
of other deadly medications. The focus on antidepressants has been due to
the extremely widespread use of these drugs along with their potential to lead
the user to extreme out of character violence toward themselves or others
coupled with their potential to lead to many other drugs being prescribed for
the antidepressant side effects they suffer (new symptoms such as a
diagnosis for Psychosis or Bipolar Disorder, Panic or Anxiety attacks,
extreme insomnia, sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, Restless Leg Syndrome,
alcohol or nicotine use/abuse, diabetes, Fibromyalgia, thyroid problems,
headaches, IBS, MS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, ADHD, etc., etc., etc.)
Many of the newer medications out there were designed specifically for the
increase in patients with these “symptoms” that are nothing more than
antidepressant side effects which would subside upon the safe withdrawal of the
individual from the offending medication – the antidepressant. And far too many

of these new drugs are just remakes of antidepressantsfar too similar in
action to these drugs. One example would be Chantix’ similarity to Zoloft.
Sarafem, prescribed for PMS, is nothing more than Prozac with a new name and
different color capsule (pink to give it a feminine touch). Duloxetine
is the chemical name for Lilly’s Cymbalta and the name generally given to a
patient prescribed the drug for urinary incontinence so that they
remain unaware that it is really an antidepressant (antidepressants have LONG
been given to children for bed wetting). Yet another antidepressant is
prescribed for tuberculosis. Then there are all of the headache medications and
too many pain killers which all have serotonergic effects and can cause many of

the same serious adverse reactions that antidepressants cause.

WE URGE YOU TO USE EXTEME CAUTION, NO MATTER THE DRUG PRESCRIBED!!!
PRESCRIPTION DRUGS ARE KILLING FAR MORE NATIONWIDE THAN ILLEGAL DRUGS!! READ
ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING BEFORE EVER PUTTING A DRUG IN YOUR MOUTH!!! INSIST ON A
PACKAGE INSERT RATHER THAN THE SHORT HANDOUT ON THE DRUG PROVIDED BY THE
PHARMACACY WHCIH DOES NOT EVEN SCRATCH THE SURFACE IN GIVING YOU THE TRUE
WARNINGS REFLECTED IN THE PACKAGE INSERTS.
__________________________________________
But last July the Food and Drug Administration, which approved Chantix in
2006, said it had received 4,762 reports of “serious psychiatric events” —
including paranoia, homicidal thoughts, hallucinations, 188 attempted suicides
and 98 suicides — and it ordered Pfizer to put a “black box” warning on the
drug.
Pfizer’s not worried for the same reason that Bristol-Myers Squibb isn’t
worried about its Abilify ad, with piano music under, showing a happy family’s
outing to a pier, accompanied by a voiceover about seizures, thoughts of
suicide, risk of death or stroke. It’s why Sanofi-aventis, the manufacturer of
Ambien, doesn’t mind spending half an ad (sleeping lady, rooster, harp) warning
of side-effects like sleep-driving and sleep-eating. And it’s why
GlaxoSmithKline is unconcerned about undercutting the effectiveness of its Requip ad

for Restless Leg Syndrome (relaxing lady, crossword puzzle, strings) with
warnings about (this is my favorite) compulsive gambling.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marty-kaplan/side-effects-include-deni_b_463996.html

Marty Kaplan

Director, Norman Lear Center and Professor at the USC
Annenberg School
Posted: February 16, 2010 12:31 PM

Side
Effects Include Denial

Why would Pfizer spend $100 million on two-minute TV ads that use a minute of
that time admitting that their drug Chantix can cause “changes in behavior,
hostility, agitation, depressed mood,” “weird, unusual or strange dreams,” and
“suicidal thoughts or actions”?

Because they have to, and because it doesn’t matter.

With the patent on Pfizer’s cash cow Lipitor expiring next year, Chantix, a
smoking cessation pill, had been one of their big hopes for the future. Chantix
sales in 2007 approached $900 million; by 2009, it accounted for 90 percent of
smoking cessation prescriptions. But last July the Food and Drug Administration,
which approved Chantix in 2006, said it had received 4,762 reports of “serious
psychiatric events” — including paranoia, homicidal thoughts, hallucinations,
188 attempted suicides and 98 suicides — and it ordered Pfizer to put a “black
box” warning on the drug.

What to do? One tack Pfizer took was to launch a “help-seeking ad” that’s now running all over cable TV. You might easily mistake it
for a public service ad. As a voiceover reads sentences appearing on a black
screen, a match-flame turns the words to smoke: “You wanted to quit before you
got married… You wanted to quit before you turned thirty-five. You wanted to
quit when you had your first child.”

At the end, you’re invited to go to MyTimeToQuit.com, which takes you not to
the Surgeon-General or to the American Cancer Society, but to a Pfizer site that
in turn leads you to Chantix. There’s no legal requirement to include the
suicide warning on the faux-PSA, because it never mentions Chantix by name.

Pfizer’s other marketing tactic was to air a testimonial. We spend two
minutes getting to know Robin, a real-life success story. In her kitchen, over a
lovely soundtrack, Robin tells us how Ben, one of her boys, asked her to stop
smoking. Her doctor prescribed Chantix. As she and her family walk around a
neighborhood of gracious lawns and fall foliage, we hear what good support and a
good drug can do. Back at home, her husband makes coffee while she slices apples
and cheese for a snack at the kitchen table. Radiant, laughing, she says that
Ben finally tired of counting the days since she quit. At the end, an
announcer’s voiceover invites us to “talk to your doctor to find out if
prescription Chantix is right for you.”

But wait a minute — literally. During half the ad, that same announcer is
also telling us about the mental health problems that can be worsened by
Chantix. Not once, but twice, he says what should be alarming words: agitation,
hostility, depressed mood, suicidal thoughts or actions. The words appear yet a
third time in the same ad, in a boxed text at the bottom of the screen.

Why isn’t Pfizer nuts to spend so much money scaring us to death about their
product? While Robin is slicing that apple, why isn’t Pfizer worried that the
voice warning about suicidal thoughts or actions will make us fret whether it’s
safe to let Robin be around sharp objects?

Pfizer’s not worried for the same reason that Bristol-Myers Squibb isn’t
worried about its Abilify ad, with piano music under, showing a happy family’s
outing to a pier, accompanied by a voiceover about seizures, thoughts of
suicide, risk of death or stroke. It’s why Sanofi-aventis, the manufacturer of

Ambien, doesn’t mind spending half an ad (sleeping lady, rooster, harp) warning
of side-effects like sleep-driving and sleep-eating. And it’s why
GlaxoSmithKline is unconcerned about undercutting the effectiveness of its Requip ad
for Restless Leg Syndrome (relaxing lady, crossword puzzle, strings) with
warnings about (this is my favorite) compulsive gambling.

Pictures are more powerful than words. Language and logic don’t have the kind
of immediate access to our brains that images and instruments do. Feeling comes
before thinking. We can be as skeptical about marketing as we like, but media
literacy isn’t much of a match for music. No wonder Plato banished the poet in

The Republic: he couldn’t think of a curriculum that could protect people from
being enthralled by fiction, spellbound by illusion. The bards who sang the
Homeric epics were the ancestors of today’s Mad Men.

Robin’s harmless kitchen knife brilliantly neuters the suicide warnings, as
does the rest of her happy-ending story. In 2005, Duke University researcher Ruth Day presented a study to the FDA demonstrating how ads
can use distracting images and music to minimize attention to risk warnings. Her
infamous example: the fast-fluttering wings of the Nasonex bee (voiced by
Antonio Banderas) prevented viewers from remembering the side effects
information. Partly as a result, last May the FDA issued draft regulations declaring that ads will be judged by their
net impression as a whole, not just whether they’re technically accurate.

Pfizer denies that increased regulatory oversight led them to
raise the time devoted to safety warnings in its Chantix ads from 14 seconds to
a minute. I suspect they could run a two-minute crawl about suicide risks, and
it still wouldn’t distract from Robin’s heartwarming testimonial. We’re suckers
for mini-movies. No wonder the corporations just unleashed by the Supreme Court
to spend unlimited funds on campaign ads are salivating at the opportunity to
enthrall us.

This is my column from The Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles.
You can read more of my columns here, and e-mail me there if you’d
like.

Follow Marty Kaplan on Twitter: www.twitter.com/martykaplan

888 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Has Huge Cache of Weapons in his House: MA

Paragraph six reads:  “According to police reports,
Girard was engaging in target practice in a makeshift, illegal shooting range in
the attic of his 23 Bridge St. condo. He also had a six-month supply of food and
prescription drugs, including

anti-depressants.”

http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/22530569/detail.html

Police: Armed Man Prepared For ‘Armageddon’

Officers Find Tear Gas, Grenades In Massachusetts Home

POSTED: 6:05 am EST February 11, 2010
UPDATED: 1:41 pm EST February
11, 2010

MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA, Mass. —

A Massachusetts man is in jail facing weapons charges after his wife turned him in

to police for having a huge cache of weapons, including rifles, tear gas
grenades and explosives, inside his North Shore condominium.

Gregory
Girard, 45, of Manchester-by-the-Sea was arrested Tuesday, police said, after he
allegedly told officers he was preparing for Armageddon.

He allegedly
told his wife, Kristine Girard, a licensed psychiatrist, that he was convinced
the end of the world was near.

“He’s convinced that martial law is
imminent, and that he made the following statements recently to (his wife):
‘Don’t talk to people. Shoot them instead. It’s fine to shoot people in the
head, because traitors deserve it,” state prosecutor Honor Segal told a judge at
Girard’s arraignment hearing.

Girard was arraigned in Salem District
Court on four counts of possession of an infernal device and four counts of

possession of a dangerous weapon and is now facing a dangerousness hearing on
Friday.

According to police reports, Girard was engaging in target
practice in a makeshift, illegal shooting range in the attic of his 23 Bridge
St. condo. He also had a six-month supply of food and prescription drugs,
including anti-depressants.
e
Police said they found about
20 high-powered rifles, shotguns and handguns, and armor-piercing bullets, in

the Girard’s second-floor condo. The weapons were purchased legally and were
registered, but officers said they also found grenades, which are illegal.

Girard’s weapons licenses were immediately revoked.

He was
described as cooperative when officers arrived to arrest him. Stunned neighbors
in the couple’s high-end condo complex said the Girards were a nice couple.

“I don’t think he was intending to harm anybody … no, I never heard
anything,” a neighbor said.

Girard has no criminal record. He pleaded
not guilty and was ordered held without bail at his arraignment.


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AL Prof Accused of Shooting Placed On Meds After Killing Her Brother 20 Yrs Ago

Paragraph 31 reads:  “Amy stated that she was not aware
of any additional facts which could assist these officers in their investigation
into the death of her brother, and she reiterated adamantly that the discharge
had been accidental and that she was still having a very difficult time dealing
with what had occurred and was currently under
medication with a doctor’s care.”

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,585823,00.html

RAW DATA: 1986 Police Report on Shooting Involving Alabama
Professor

Sunday, February 14, 2010 []

March
30, 1987

To: First Assistant District Attorney John P.
Kivlan

From: Trooper Brian L. Howe #1332 BLH

Subject: Accidental

Shooting of Seth Bishop, White Male,

D.O.B. 4/9/68 At 46 Hollis Avenue,
Braintree, Massachusetts on December 6, 1986.

Case: #
86-112-0910-0185

On December 6, 1986, this officer was directed by
Detective Lieutenant James Sharkey to conduct an investigation into the fatal
shooting of Seth Bishop at his residence of 46 Hollis Avenue in the Town of

Braintree.

This officer contacted Captain Theodore Buker of the Braintree
Police Department and was informed by Captain Buker that at approximately 1422
hours on December 6, 1986, the Braintree Police Department had responded to the
report of a shooting a 46 Hollis Avenue in their town.

Upon arriving at
the location, Officers Jordan and Murphy had observed the decedent lying on his
back on the floor in a pool of blood in the kitchen area, with a large chest
wound.

Paramedics responded to the scene and after administering
preliminary first aid, transported the victim to the Quincy City Hospital where
he was subsequently pronounced dead at 1506 hours, by Dr. Thomas Divinigracia.
Initial cause of death of a victim was reported to be a ruptured aorta as a
result of a gunshot wound to the chest.

Captain Buker stated that
preliminary investigation conducted by Officers Jordan and Murphy indicated that
the victim had been shot by his sister, Amy Bishop (age 19), and that apparent
cause of the gunshot discharge into the victim had been accidental in nature.
Captain Buker further stated that indications were that Amy Bishop had been
attempting to manipulate the shotgun and had subsequently brought the gun
downstairs in an attempt to gain assistance from her mother in disarming the
weapon.

During her attempt to disarm the weapon in the kitchen of her

residence, the weapon had apparently accidentally discharged, resulting in the
fatal wound inflicted upon her brother.

Captain Buker further stated that
at the time the discharge occurred, Judy Bishop, the mother of both the victim
and Amy, had been in the kitchen and had witnessed the entire incident. Judy
Bishop had indicated to the responding officers that the discharge had been
accidental in nature and that the discharge had occurred while Amy was
attempting to unload the weapon.

Captain Buker also stated that Amy
Bishop had fled the residence immediately upon discharging the weapon and had
subsequently been located by Braintree Officers and brought to the Braintree
Police Department for questioning.

Captain Buker stated that due to the
highly emotional state of Amy Bishop, it had generally been impossible to
question her while she was at the Braintree Police Department relative to the
circumstances of the firearm discharge, and that as a result of these facts, she
was thereupon released to the custody of her parents with further investigation
to follow at a future time.

This officer therefor determined that due to
the inability to question the witnesses at that time as a result of their highly
emotional state and their inability to recall specifically the facts relating to
this occurrence, as well as the fact that Judy Bishop stated that she had
witnessed the entire affair and the discharge had been accidental in nature, it
was determined that additional interviews would be conducted at a later time,
allowing the witnesses a sufficient time to stabilize their emotions.

On

December 6, 1986, an autopsy was conducted on Seth bishop at the Qyuincy City
Hospital by Dr. George Katsas with Dr. William Riddle in attendance. The autopsy
began at approximately 2000 hours with the cause of death having been determined
to be the result of a shotgun discharge to the left chest area.

It should
also be noted that a check of firearms identification cards at Braintree Police
Department indicated and F.I.D. card issued to Seth bishop, card #H590682, as
well as n F.I.D. card issued to Samuel Bishop father of SEth, card
#H590724.

Captain Buker had also indicated to this officer that numerous
photographs had been taken at the scene of the shooting as well as at the
autopsty coundcted on the victim.

The weapon which had been utilized in
the death of Seth Bishop had been secured by the Braintree Police Department for
firther processing by the State Police Ballistics
Laboratory.

Arrangements were subsequently made to conduct interviews of

all of the members of the Bishop family and thereupon, on December 17, 1986,
this officer, Captian Theodore Buker and Detective Michael Carey of the
Braintree Police Department procdeede to 46 Hollis Avenue in the Town of
Braintree.

Individually, Samuel, Judy, and Amy Bishop were interviewed by
these officers with the resulting statments taken.

Samuel Bishop stated
that he had not been in the residence at the time of the shooting, He said that
he had left the house at approximately 1130 hours to go shopping at the South
Shore Plaza. He stated that at the time he left the residence, his son Seth had
been washing his car, Amy was the house and his wife, Judy, was due to be home
at sometime between 1100 and 1200 hours. Samuel stated that he had a disagrrment
with Amy before he left about a comment that she made, and that she had gone to

her room prior to his departing. He stated that upon his return to the
residence, police and ambulance were at the house and that he was adivsed of the
situation relating to the shooting of his son.

When questioned as to the
actual possession of the shotgun within his residence, he stated that he had
bought the shotgun at Coleman’s Sporting Goods in Canton, approximately one year
previously, and that he and his son, Seth, had belonged to the Braintree Rifle
Club. He stated that the gun had been unloaded, on top of a trunk in a rifle
case in his upstairs bedroom also. He further stated that Amy had not been
trained in the use of the weapon and that the weapon had orginally been
purchased for family protection as a result of a previous housebreak at their
residence.

These officer then interviewed Judy Bishop, the mother of the
victim who stated that on the day of the shooting, she had left the house at
approximately 0700 hours and that ll other family members had been in the house
at the time. She stated that she returned to the residence to see if there was
anything for lunch, and that at this time, Seth was home and stated that he
would go to the store to pick up some food so that they could all have
lunch.

Judy further stated that Seth returned from the grocery store,
went into the livingroom and turned on television. She stated that he was on his
way into the kitchen when Amy came downstairs with the shotgun, and asked Judy
if she could help her unload the gun. Judy state that she told Amy not to point
the gun at anyone, and that Amy then turned, and in doing so, somehow discharged
the weapon which subsequently hit her son Seth who was walking into the kitchen
from the living room.

Judy stated that she screamed and theupon Amy ran
out of the house. Judy state that she then called the police and waited at the
front door fo the arrival of the police, but she further added that she knew
that Seth could not live as the result of the injury which he had
received.

When questioned relative to any prior discharges of the weapon
inside the residence on the day in question, Judy stated that she did not hear
any other shots fired, in particular, and shots fired in the upstairs bedroom,
but she believed that the house was realtively well soundproofed and that such a
discharge would not necessarily be hear on another floor of the
house.

Judy state that she did not feel that she had any knowledge of any
other relvant facts relating to the investigation to convey to these
officers.

These officers then conducted an interview with Amy Bishop who
stated that on the morning of the shooting, her mother had gone out and that her

father had gone shopping. Amy stated that she did not know where her brother was
during the day but thought that it would be a good idea if she learned how to
load the shotgun in the house. Amy stated that she was concerned for her own
safety on occasions as a result of the break which had previously occurred at
their home, and she often read and heard of stories about things that happened
when people break into houses and find other people inside.

Amy stated
that she got the gun from her parents’ room where she found it on the chest and
the bullets were on the bureau. She stated that she put the shells into the gun
and then tried to get them out but was unsuccessful in doing this even though
she attempted to unscrew the bottom casing of the gun. She stated that while she
was attempting to unload the weapon which was on her bed, it discharged into her

room, but that she is unsure as whether or not her bedroom door was open at the
time. She stated that she was beside her bed near the door at the time that the
gun discharged, but that she couldn’t specifically recall seeing anything coming
out of the gun.

Amy further stated that she does not recall putting any
additional bullets into the gun after it discharged, and that she then unscrewed
the bottom of the shaft in an attempt to empty the weapon, and when being unable
to empty the weapon this way, she stated that she then screwed the bottom of the
shaft back on.

Amy stated that she then heard her brother come into the
house downstairs and she went right downstairs to ask Seth to help her unload
the gun. She said apparently her mother had been in the kitchen for awhile and
that Amy went down the front set of stairs, through the dining room, to the door
by the kitchen. She stated that she asked her brother to unload the weapon
because she thought it might still be loaded and she added that her mother said
something to her but she does not specifically recall what it was.

Amy
said that she was carrying the gun pointed beside her leg, and that Seth told

her to point the gun up. Amy stated that Seth was walking across the kitchen
between Amy and her mother and that Amy had the gun in one hand and started to
raise it. Amy further stated that someone said something to her and she turned
and the gun went off. She stated that she remembered her brother saying, “Oh
God,” and her mother screaming, and that Amy though that she had ruined the
kitchen but was not aware of the fact that she had struck her brother with the
shotgun discharge.

Amy stated that she then immediately ran out the rear
door of the kitchen and thought that she had dropped the gun as she ran away.
She stated that at the time the gun went off, she was by the dining room door to
the kitchen. Amy also said that she does not recall putting on a jacket prior to
running out of the house or leaving the house with the gun and that she cannot
recall anything else until she subsequently saw her mother at the police
station.

Amy did tell these officers that her brother Seth had verbally
told her previously how to hold the gun but that she had always previously been
afraid of it. Amy concluded the investigation by saying that she had previously
made no attempt to cover up the hole in her bedroom wall which apparently,
according to her, was the result of the previous discharge in her

bedroom.

Amy stated that she was not aware of any additional facts which
could assist these officers in their investigation into the death of her
brother, and she reiterated adamantly that the discharge had been accidental and
that she was still having a very difficult time dealing with what had occurred
and was currently under medication with a doctor’s care.

As a result of
these foregoing facts, a meeting was conducted between this officer, Captain
Buker and Detective Carey. It was determined that due to the testimony of the
members of the Bishop family and, in particular, to the testimony of Judy Bishop
relevant to the facts concerning the death of Seth Bishop that no further
investigation into the death of Seth Bishop was warranted.

It was
therefore determined that the cause of death of Seth Bishop would be listed as
the accidental discharge of his sister, Amy Bishop, and that the investigation
would be concluded.

1,388 total views, 1 views today