WELLBUTRIN & BUSPAR: Anna Nicole Smith’s Doctor on Meds Had Affair w/Her

Last sentence of paragraph two reads:  “Kapoor’s journal
also indicated he himself was abusing Ambien, BuSpar, and
Wellbutrin: ‘I have to get off the drugs,’ he wrote in
2002.

http://www.newser.com/story/72825/2nd-doc-hooked-up-with-anna.html

 

2nd Doc Hooked Up With Anna

 

Sandeep Kapoor wrote in diary about tryst with Anna Nicole
Smith

By Evann Gastaldo|

(Newser) – Just in case
anyone thought the Anna Nicole Smith hearing couldn’t get any kinkier: It can,
and it did. An investigator testified yesterday that Smith physician Sandeep
Kapoor­who is facing charges along with psychiatrist Khristine Eroshevich
and lawyer Howard K. Stern­had a less-than-professional relationship with
Smith, “making out” with her and providing her with drugs, E!

 

reports.

The investigator found a journal in which Kapoor wrote, in
2005, “I was making out with Anna, my patient, blurring the lines. I gave her
Methadone, Valium. Can she ruin me?” Eroshevich is also accused of having an
inappropriate relationship with Smith. Kapoor’s journal also indicated he
himself was abusing Ambien, BuSpar, and Wellbutrin: “I have to get off the
drugs,” he wrote in 2002.

1,030 total views, no views today

PAXIL: Postpartum: Mother Has Worsening Depression with 2nd Baby

PAXIL:   PostpartumMother Has
Worsening Depression with 2nd Baby After Taking Antidepressants:  Had

Postpartum with 1st Baby and Recovered With No Meds:
U.S.A.

Sentences three through seven read:  ” I went through postpartum depression with my first baby eight years ago but at
that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any medication.
And I started getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s
been three months that I am going through this. I have been
taking medications (Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg) and getting counseling but
it’s not helping much. I still don’t feel myself and am having unwanted
thoughts.”

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/expert.q.a/09/08/postpartum.depression.raison/

Expert Q&A

updated 10:03 a.m. EDT, Tue September 8,
2009

How long will my postpartum depression last?

Asked by Sheeza Ashraf, Fremont, California

I have a
4-month-old baby. I am going through postpartum depression with a lot of anxiety
and panic attacks. I went through postpartum depression with my first baby eight
years ago but at that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any
medication. And I started getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s
been three months that I am going through this. I have been taking medications
(Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg) and getting counseling but it’s not helping much. I
still don’t feel myself and am having unwanted thoughts. How long does

postpartum depression last? Is this temporary? Will this anxiety and depression
ever go away? Should I stop the medications and try it on my own? Does exercise
help to get out of the depression? Will I ever be normal like I was
before?

Mental Health Expert Dr.
Charles Raison
Psychiatrist,
Emory University Medical School

Expert answer

Dear Sheeza,

I am sorry to hear of your difficulties —
you are far from alone in your struggles with postpartum depression. Indeed, up
to 20 percent of women become depressed in the six months following delivery,
but company doesn’t help much when it comes to depression — or at least the
company we typically provide in the U.S. Traditional cultures understood the
vulnerability of new mothers and would often surround them with family and
friends to help with the significant emotional and practical burdens of coping

with the newborn.

I am going to make some general recommendations about
what you might want to consider doing, based only on the information you have
provided above. As always, this should not be taken as specific advice for your
actual situation. That kind of advice can come only from a clinician who knows
you and is involved in your care.

First and most important, it is very
important to continue medication when one is still depressed, so given what you
describe, I would counsel against stopping the antidepressant. It is not clear
how long you have been on the Paxil (generic: paroxetine), but let’s assume
you’ve been on it for at least six weeks. You are on a low dose. A reasonable
first step would be to talk with your doctor about raising the dose to 40 mg a
day and trying this dose for at least several weeks.

If you see no
benefit, there are in general two paths your doctor might recommend (and I say
doctor in the generic sense, given that many folks nowadays see physician
assistants or nurse practitioners who often — in my experience — do a better
job diagnosing and treating depression than do MDs). First, your doctor might
add a second antidepressant or an atypical antipsychotic to your Paxil. Although
they are called “antipsychotics,” these agents (for example Seroquel, Abilify,
Zyprexa) are also widely used to help with severe depression and anxiety and are
often quite effective. Second, your doctor might switch you from the Paxil to
another antidepressant. Unfortunately, we have no scientific way of knowing
which agent you should switch to — our best data suggest that they are all
about equal. But one thing is clear: Many people who don’t do well with one
antidepressant will have a great response to a different one.

Anxiety and
panic are quite common when one has a bad depression, and they can be more
miserable to endure than the feeling of depression itself. It is unlikely that
the low dose of Buspar (generic: buspirone) you are taking is of much benefit.
You might want to discuss with your doctor raising the dose to at least 10 mg
three times a day or discontinuing it. The best immediate way to relieve
disabling anxiety is through the use of benzodiazepines (for example lorazepam
or clonazepam). These medications can be lifesavers, but if you take them for
more than three or four weeks your body will become dependent upon them, and
should you want to stop, you will have to reduce them slowly under the
supervision of a doctor.

Let me say a word about exercise. Yes, exercise

has been shown in many studies not only to raise a person’s mood immediately,
but also to work over time as an antidepressant. Therefore, I strongly recommend
adding regular exercise to your treatment regimen. Try to exercise in the
morning, especially when it is sunny. To get the best effect you will need to
work up a sweat. I find that it is even better if you can exercise in a place
with some natural beauty — as being in nature is itself quite comforting for
most of us.

I don’t have an answer to your question about how long the
depression will last and whether it will ever go away. Everyone is different. We
do know, however, that the longer one stays depressed and/or the more episodes
one has had, the harder it is to treat the condition. This is just the
frightening truth of the disease, and it really highlights how important it is
for you to really get aggressive about your treatment. My sincere hope is that
whatever specific treatment route you follow, you will start feeling like
yourself again as quickly as possible.

Finally, whenever I talk about
specific pharmacologic treatments I need to disclose that in addition to my
academic work I have given lectures for two pharmaceutical companies in the last
year: Lilly and Wyeth. I have also served on an advisory board for Lilly in the
last 12 months.
[]

370 total views, no views today

PAXIL: Postpartum Depression Medication Worsens Depression

Sentences three through seven read:  ” I went through
postpartum depression with my first baby eight years ago but at
that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any medication.
And I started getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s
been three months that I am going through this. I have been
taking medications (Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg) and getting counseling but
it’s not helping much. I still don’t feel myself and am having unwanted
thoughts.”

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/expert.q.a/09/08/postpartum.depression.raison/

Expert Q&A

updated 10:03 a.m. EDT, Tue September
8, 2009

How long will my postpartum depression last?

Asked
by Sheeza Ashraf, Fremont, California

I have a 4-month-old baby. I am
going through postpartum depression with a lot of anxiety and panic attacks. I
went through postpartum depression with my first baby eight years ago but at
that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any medication. And I started
getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s been three months that I am
going through this. I have been taking medications (Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg)
and getting counseling but it’s not helping much. I still don’t feel myself and
am having unwanted thoughts. How long does postpartum depression last? Is this
temporary? Will this anxiety and depression ever go away? Should I stop the
medications and try it on my own? Does exercise help to get out of the

depression? Will I ever be normal like I was before?

Mental
Health Expert
Dr.
Charles Raison
Psychiatrist,
Emory University Medical School

Expert answer

Dear Sheeza,

I am sorry to hear
of your difficulties — you are far from alone in your struggles with postpartum
depression. Indeed, up to 20 percent of women become depressed in the six months
following delivery, but company doesn’t help much when it comes to depression
or at least the company we typically provide in the U.S. Traditional cultures
understood the vulnerability of new mothers and would often surround them with
family and friends to help with the significant emotional and practical burdens
of coping with the newborn.

I am going to make some general
recommendations about what you might want to consider doing, based only on the
information you have provided above. As always, this should not be taken as
specific advice for your actual situation. That kind of advice can come only
from a clinician who knows you and is involved in your care.

First and
most important, it is very important to continue medication when one is still
depressed, so given what you describe, I would counsel against stopping the
antidepressant. It is not clear how long you have been on the Paxil (generic:
paroxetine), but let’s assume you’ve been on it for at least six weeks. You are
on a low dose. A reasonable first step would be to talk with your doctor about
raising the dose to 40 mg a day and trying this dose for at least several weeks.

If you see no benefit, there are in general two paths your doctor might
recommend (and I say doctor in the generic sense, given that many folks nowadays
see physician assistants or nurse practitioners who often — in my experience —
do a better job diagnosing and treating depression than do MDs). First, your
doctor might add a second antidepressant or an atypical antipsychotic to your
Paxil. Although they are called “antipsychotics,” these agents (for example
Seroquel, Abilify, Zyprexa) are also widely used to help with severe depression
and anxiety and are often quite effective. Second, your doctor might switch you
from the Paxil to another antidepressant. Unfortunately, we have no scientific
way of knowing which agent you should switch to — our best data suggest that
they are all about equal. But one thing is clear: Many people who don’t do well
with one antidepressant will have a great response to a different
one.

Anxiety and panic are quite common when one has a bad depression,
and they can be more miserable to endure than the feeling of depression itself.
It is unlikely that the low dose of Buspar (generic: buspirone) you are taking
is of much benefit. You might want to discuss with your doctor raising the dose
to at least 10 mg three times a day or discontinuing it. The best immediate way
to relieve disabling anxiety is through the use of benzodiazepines (for example
lorazepam or clonazepam). These medications can be lifesavers, but if you take
them for more than three or four weeks your body will become dependent upon
them, and should you want to stop, you will have to reduce them slowly under the
supervision of a doctor.

Let me say a word about exercise. Yes, exercise
has been shown in many studies not only to raise a person’s mood immediately,
but also to work over time as an antidepressant. Therefore, I strongly recommend
adding regular exercise to your treatment regimen. Try to exercise in the
morning, especially when it is sunny. To get the best effect you will need to
work up a sweat. I find that it is even better if you can exercise in a place
with some natural beauty — as being in nature is itself quite comforting for
most of us.

I don’t have an answer to your question about how long the

depression will last and whether it will ever go away. Everyone is different. We
do know, however, that the longer one stays depressed and/or the more episodes
one has had, the harder it is to treat the condition. This is just the
frightening truth of the disease, and it really highlights how important it is
for you to really get aggressive about your treatment. My sincere hope is that
whatever specific treatment route you follow, you will start feeling like
yourself again as quickly as possible.

Finally, whenever I talk about
specific pharmacologic treatments I need to disclose that in addition to my
academic work I have given lectures for two pharmaceutical companies in the last
year: Lilly and Wyeth. I have also served on an advisory board for Lilly in the
last 12 months.
[]

481 total views, 3 views today

My Boyfriend Committed Murder Thanks to Effexor

“(His doctor) cut him off his medication ‘cold turkey’ and put him directly on Buspar.”

 

Hi. I’m very distraught. I desperately need some help. My boyfriend, who had been on 225 mg of Effexor for over a year, started having severe headaches. By the way, I need to mention that this doctor never even did bloodwork on him before putting him on anti-depressants. Steve has always been such a kind caring person. But, my soon to be ex-husband had been stalking us constantly and threatening our lives. Well, after Steve complained of these major headaches to his doctor, the doctor told him to come in for an appointment (which he did). Once there, the doctor never evaluated him. He cut him off his medication “cold turkey” and put him directly on Buspar (which takes weeks to take effect). I never knew that there was such a thing as withdrawals until I started looking for anything I can find to help Steve. You see, one week and one day after being cut off his medication like that, Steve “blacked out” and drove to my soon to be ex husbands house, and shot both my ex and my ex’s mother to death. He doesn’t even remember going there. NOW, he’s in jail, looking at two counts of first-degree murder. From all I’ve found lately, withdrawals from this terrible drug can and does trigger this in people. Plus Steve thought he had the flu. He was very sick for a week after the medication was taken from him. So, he started taking Ny-quill and Tylenol cold and flu. I just found out today that this is a HUGE no with an SSRI in your system. No one told him about ANY of this. I’m so hurt right now. I don’t want Steve to spend the rest of his life in prison (or worse) for something he had no control over. He is only 33, and we were (and still are) engaged. His doctor never warned him of these withdrawals. We didn’t even know they existed. I also found out that my ex was on massive dosages of Paxil, plus two other antianxiety and antidepressants. No wonder he acted so crazy! All that stress plus all the reactions of these medicines HAD to be what made Steve “snap”. I just hope I can help him prove it to the jury and get him acquitted. Now that he has that poison completely out of his system, he is back to being the Steve I know. Hardly anyone, even the guards can believe Steve could do something like that. They always tell me what a nice man he is! I forgot to mention, he is a Christian. He doesn’t believe in violence at all. PLEASE help me to help him. I love him, and my children and I all want him back home, where he belongs. In MY opinion, the makers of Effexor and his doctor are the ones who should go to prison. Steve isn’t the first one this has happened to apparently, and unless someone stops these people from putting dangerous drugs in people’s bodies without informing them of the risks, I’m afraid he won’t be the last one it happens to. I’m sorry I rattled on so long, but I’m desperate. I want my fiancée back! I’m also VERY scared, because MY doctor put ME on Paxil after this. Now that I’ve seen all this stuff about Paxil, as well as Effexor. I’m petrified.

I hope to hear from others who have gone through this nightmare, and maybe offer me a ray of hope for Steve.

Cheryl
sapphire_eyes2@hotmail.com

 

1/16/2002

This is Survivor Story number 48.

Total number of stories in current database is 48

568 total views, no views today

Prozac and Klonopin Wrecked My Life

“They ruined me. I am damaged goods forever.”

 

I am a mom of three, married and now (sort of) normal – although I have bouts of depression I have managed to maintain some sense of sanity, well—as much as I can considering I messed my life up by using Klonopin and Prozac and Paxil.

In the beginning of my usage of anti depressants (1993) the docs tried me on everything, amitriptilyne, BusPar, Serzone, and many many others that I cannot remember (my memory is still kind of crappy, can you tell?)

I had clinical depression and anxiety. Panic attacks anxiety and thoughts of suicide.

In 1994 the doc put me on a mixture of Prozac and Klonopin. This was the most horrible thing that ever happened to me. I was a crappy mom, thank god (or whatever) I had a great patient husband to stick by me and take care of the kids! I also began to think I was kind of like superman. I thought I could do anything, even break the law and get away with it. I did break the law and ended up on felony probation for 5 years (actually 2 five years sentences running concurrently) for “felony intimidation”. That wrecked my life BIG TIME — you have no idea. I once had dreams and goals, and they all came to a crashing halt from that. On Prozac I was violent. I broke my hand twice from punching walls, and I was more suicidal than ever. I had a noose ready in the basement, hidden in the beams – for “just in case” and I used to go down there alone and swing on it to test its strength and plan on how I was going to do it (kill myself) one day soon.

The klonopin – I thought it was a great drug for four years, I called it “my drunk in a pill”. I gained 70 pounds from all of these pills, I lost hair, I have terrible skin/acne, I was agoraphobic and afraid of everyone, and I basically sunk to the lowest level I could ever get to. I wouldn’t go for groceries, I wouldn’t leave the house, and I hid in dark depression taking my Paxil and Klonopin…thinking it was helping me.

1997 springtime, I put myself through detox/drug rehab to get off of Klonopin. I couldn’t do it alone and had tried many many many times. They tapered me off, and I went home and three days later my world shattered. I had severe withdrawal, ringing in my ears, stomach cramps, no memory – so much more -I sincerely thought I was brain damaged forever. It took 6 weeks of hell to start to feel better. That was the tip of the iceberg though. I still suffer many things, like a terrible memory and TOTAL feelings of confusion.

I tapered off of Paxil (the antidepressant I was put on after Prozac made me so freaking weird), and now (2001) I get by breathing and taking vitamins and just coping on my own without depending or hoping there is a cure in a pill.

Needless to say, I am an ex-felon now. My name was all over the front page of newspapers. I am embarrassed to fill out a job app because they want to know your criminal history, and my life is altered because of these so called “helpful” miracle drugs. I screwed my kids, my husband and myself by taking these pills. I embarrassed and humiliated my family; I wrecked my life, and caused innocent people to fear for their lives.

I would suggest to anyone, try to get through whatever is happening in your life without taking these pills. They mess up your head. They are all physically addicting (even though docs tell you different) and they can ruin you.

They ruined me. I am damaged goods forever.

I feel sorry for my kids.

Do NOT take these pills!

DO NOT TAKE THESE PILLS and if you are on them or know someone who is, HELP them to stop before they wreck their life or someone else’s.

If I knew then what I know now, I wouldn’t have a criminal record.

 

7/31/2001

This is Survivor Story number 17.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

439 total views, no views today

Uncontrolled Crying Withdrawing from Effexor

“Two days after my last dose was hell.”

 

One issue not brought up yet in the Effexor stories is that because it is so fast-acting, it should be taken at the same time every day. If I had known this, I would have disqualified myself from this medication.

If I had known about the withdrawal, I also would have decided to go without “this time.” But there would have been a next time. Now there won’t be a next time.
My initial complaint was a “different sort of depressed” feeling. Not like the major depressions I’ve had in the past, but uncontrolled crying and irritability. My psychiatrist, now that she is leaving her group, tells me that she was not allowed to offer psychotherapy, only drugs. I was not told this when I saw her, but I admit I was open to more drugs. I thought I had responded well to Zoloft in the past, but didn’t like being anorgasmic. I had responded very badly to Serzone. She first put me on Buspar, as she felt I was more anxious than depressed. I gave it what I felt to be a decent try (about 3 months) but the dizziness never really went away, and although I drink less than one drink a week, I was going to Tuscany and felt it quite unfair that I couldn’t drink while there. So I took myself off in about 2 weeks and one step down.
A month or so after I returned from the vacation, I was put on Effexor because of extreme fatigue, lethargy and bothersome “fuzzy brain”(that I had also brought to my GP and she had been unable to diagnose). [Note that all of these effects are listed as withdrawal symptoms with the SSRIs. Dr. Tracy]

I spent the next 5 months increasing my dosage on Effexor because it didn’t appear to be making anything worse, but I was still not better. I had also been suffering from extreme constipation (concurrent with the removal of Buspar) which after many GI tests my GI doctor ruled as “mulitcausal” and washed his hands of me.

The constipation became significantly less bothersome after a major stress date in my life passed. But by then insomnia compounded by nightmares were added to my list of symptoms.

I talked to all 3 doctors about the increasing muscle spasms I had been noticing. “That’s normal”was the most response I got. I was referred to a neurologist, who could find nothing but lessened reflexes on one leg. I was intermittently experiencing buzzing in my brain that I was afraid to mention to anyone.
I felt urges to voluntarily spasm my neck muscles, and the longer I delayed doing so, the more it felt involuntary when I finally relented (voluntary tics??). I worried about myself!!

Since I hope to get pregnant soon, my husband and I decided that I needed to get off of the Effexor — definitely not enough benefit for that kind of risk. I weaned myself in what I thought was a slow manner — a minimum of a week between drops, some drops I stayed on for 2 1/2 weeks. 5 drops in all.

Two days after my last dose (yesterday) was hell — and I also received “Prozac Backlash”in the mail. Talk about reading about yourself! I now believe that many of the symptoms that kept me on the Effexor were really withdrawal symptoms!
I would sometimes take it at 10 in the morning, sometimes at 2 in the afternoon. If I’d forgotten, I would take it at night and then try to wait until the evening the next day, but then would be back to the morning.

Now I am very worried about how long I will be experiencing all the buzzing and dizziness (ironic, my left ear says “quack quack”to me a few times a minute), the urge to spasm, the crying and irritability (thank God my husband not only understands but is very relieved to finally have a reason for some of my complaints!).

And my psychiatrist? I saw her about two weeks ago and let her know how I had been coming off the Effexor. She never mentioned any side effects or to take it slower. I indicated that I would like: 1) a short-term sleeping aide to help get my sleep schedule back on track and 2) something to take when the stress builds up to too much and I “flip”. My preference is to sleep until I am better, and I didn’t want to keep raiding my medicine cabinet for whatever heavy-duty painkillers were still in there.

What did she prescribe? Neurontin. To take “as needed”for both purposes. No wonder there is such a movement towards “alternative”medicine. I don’t know if I’ll ever trust a drug prescription again.

I am so glad I am not exposing a growing fetus to this!

L G
Austin, TX

 

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 49.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

432 total views, 1 views today