Study: Australian Doctors Are Both Depressed and Stressed

 

Doctors Ready for Surgery

Australian Doctors Are Depressed, Stressed –

Having A Four Times Greater Rate of Suicidal Thoughts Than the Normal Population!!!

We have already posted months ago that 25% of the Australian Parliament admit to taking antidepressants. But what are their doctors taking? Apparently the same drugs they are doling out to their patients – antidepressants. Look at the following stats from this research:

“Oncologists are the most psychologically distressed specialists, while doctors who do not deal directly with patients think about suicide most often.

“One in five medical students and one in ten doctors have had suicidal thoughts in the previous 12 months, compared with one in 45 people in the wider community, according to the report.

“Based on responses to the survey, more than a quarter of doctors are likely to have a minor psychiatric disorder like mild depression or mild anxiety, which is much more than the broader community.

‘Although many doctors are embarrassed to admit they have a problem, they are more likely to seek help than the general population.” [Of course that means, as I have said before, they are more likely to be “medicated” for these problems than the normal population.]

[And you have to love this line!!!] “Doctors are role models. They lead by example and will encourage other members of the population to seek help early.” In that line you find the reason for this survey and the push by this Australian group to get more doctors “medicated” for their mental illness.” In doing so they know that, just as any drug user in the street, they will recommend the same drugs to others. The group, called Beyond Blue, appears to be a carbon copy of our US counterpart, NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill) – a group almost fully funded by Pharma (75%) to encourage family members to keep their loved ones on the medications they are on.

Just a couple of weeks ago I sent out a post containing many cases of medical professionals or their family members here in the States involved in murders or murder/suicides associated with their use of or possible use of antidepressants. I also stated that in my experience of gathering cases for our database at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org medical and psychological professionals by far make up the largest single group facing serious problems with antidepressants and antipsychotics.

And as shocking as the percentages are out of Australia I would say they are certainly conservative figures next to ours because in 2007 a TV camera crew came from Russia to interview me. At the last minute they let me know that they wanted to film me giving a lecture. So we quickly put out some flyers and decided to have the lecture right at my home. We packed the place with only a days’ notice with about 50 people coming from as far as 7 hours away…I say that only to point out how very many there are facing problems with these drugs.

After my lecture one of the two psych nurses who attended stood to say they never get to hear what I had shared with them that evening but she personally knew it was true because she was on Lexapro and having all the reactions I had mentioned. She then said that 75% of the doctors and nurses she worked with are taking antidepressants!!!!! She explained that the drug reps were telling them they are in a very stressful profession and they need to “nip in the bud” the depression that would surely follow all that stress. An old but successful sales line.

Keep in mind that if stress leads to depression and doctors are in a stressful profession antidepressants would be the last thing they would need since elevated levels of cortisol are what indicate stress while a study done by the makers of Prozac (Petralgia 1984) found that taking one single 30 mg dose of Prozac will DOUBLE cortisol levels thereby DOUBLING stress levels. Although that is the only one we have studies to indicate this increase it can be expected in all SSRI and SNRI antidepressants as the drastic cortisol increase is linked to the increased serotonin.

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

 

 

Original article:

Aussie Doctors Are Depressed, Stressed

More than a quarter of doctors are likely to have a minor psychiatric disorder and one in ten has had suicidal thoughts, according to a major study.
Source AAP

Doctors are far more depressed and stressed than other Australians, with a disproportionate number having suicidal thoughts, according to a major study.

Students and doctors aged under 30, particularly women, are at most risk of suicidal thoughts and mental illness, according to the survey commissioned by mental health charity beyondblue.

Oncologists are the most psychologically distressed specialists, while doctors who do not deal directly with patients think about suicide most often.

One in five medical students and one in ten doctors have had suicidal thoughts in the previous 12 months, compared with one in 45 people in the wider community, according to the report.

Based on responses to the survey, more than a quarter of doctors are likely to have a minor psychiatric disorder like mild depression or mild anxiety, which is much more than the broader community.

Although many doctors are embarrassed to admit they have a problem, they are more likely to seek help than the general population.

This is a good sign, says Dr Mukesh Haikerwal, former Australian Medical Association president and chair of the beyondblue doctors mental health program.

“It is a step towards removing the stigma from mental illness.

“Doctors are role models. They lead by example and will encourage other members of the population to seek help early.

“There is great resilience within the medical profession but doctors do fall into depression and anxiety and must get early treatment and intervention,” he says.

The Roy Morgan survey, which was completed by more than 14,000 doctors and medical students, shows men work longer hours and engage in more risky drinking, but women doctors are more distressed and think about suicide more often.

Perceived stigma is rife, with four in 10 agreeing that many doctors think less of doctors who have experienced depression or anxiety.

Just under five per cent list bullying and 1.7% list racism as a cause of stress.

Kate Carnell, the CEO of beyondblue, says the survey identifies the challenges the medical community faces and outlines how they can be tackled.

“This includes initiatives such as a mental health strategy for the Australian medical community, guidelines around working hours and better mental health education in universities to reduce stigma.

“If doctors do not deal with the mental health issues they are experiencing it can affect their ability to deliver the best care,” she says.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2013/10/08/aussie-doctors-are-depressed-stressed

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Prisoner of Paxil

“I work as a home health aide, I cringe when I hear our patients being prescribed Paxil.”

My name is Nancy Patton,

I have been on Paxil for several years.

One of the side effects is weight gain. With my Drs assist he took me off Paxil and prescribed another anti depressant.

Each day was a living hell without the Paxil. My Dr. told me a few days Id be ok. I felt like banging my head against a brick wall due to severe headaches and body aches. My co workers are nurses and they we’re very concerned about my well being. I wasn’t the same person. I felt my life was over and what was the point. My husband also concerned told me to go back on the Paxil. I went back on and within 3 days I felt a lot better. I’m still taking the Paxil. I often feel great fear when I think someone will take it off the market . I don’t think I could bear to feel and live in that empty black hole. I truly think I would have to go to a detox unit to get off of Paxil. It’s almost being held a prisoner. I work as a home health aide, I cringe when I hear our patients being prescribed Paxil. Some elderly have dementia and I wonder what their minds would through if they’d stop or forget to take it. This is my sincere account of my experience.

Thank You,

Nancy Patton
Celina, Ohio 45822
rocnasia@bright.net

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Paxil Nearly Killed Me.

“Nothing is as awful as life was on Paxil.”

 

In September 1997 I was feeling down. Since each day seemed to be worse from the previous, I called the local mental health agency asking for help. Within 3 weeks, I was given an appointment, and prescribed Paxil for depression (which I questioned because a friend of mine who was a neurosurgeon had been taking Paxil and killed himself 3 months earlier) and lorazepam for anxiety.

A few weeks passed and I was not feeling any better. I had quit going to do things outside my house and I knew there was something wrong. I told my therapist who said to wait a while because sometimes it takes a month or so for the Paxil to work. So, I waited for 2 more weeks, by this time I could not get out of bed at all. I did not shower or eat either. I called the doctor and then went to see him. I told him there was something very wrong. I wanted to die. I wondered if I needed more medication (I felt so rotten, I thought if I felt this bad on the medication, I thought I would be worse without it) He wrote a script for Trazadone. I took it and did not wake up for 23 hours. I called the clinic, there was no one there who could help and I was asked to call back the next day. The next day was Wednesday, I called again, no one called me back. Thursday I had an appointment with my therapist. I told her I was doing awful and had thrown the Trazadone away. I explained if one pill could knock me out for 23 hours, I did not need 30 of them in the house the way I was feeling. I told her something was very wrong and she said to talk to the doctor. He was unreachable. Friday I called again after no return phone calls. I got the nurses voice mail. I left a message. About 5:30 pm she called me back and I told her there was something very wrong with me. She said everyone was gone and she would have the doctor call me on Monday. I told her again there was something wrong with my meds and I needed help.

At about 7:00 pm I took 60 Lorazepam (although I had no idea what I was doing and have no memory of wanting to die) and cuddled down into my bed and went to sleep. (I don’t remember the next four days. The following is the pieces as told to me) At 11pm I called my sister in law and told her I took a bunch of pills She took me to the hospital where no one believed how much Lorazepam I had taken until they took a blood level. It was too late to pump my stomach so I had to drink Charcoal. The hospital released me about 2 hours later and said to continue my Paxil until Monday when the Doctor could talk to me.

I am told I stayed in bed all day Saturday and mostly slept. I tried to get up a few times but fell (and had huge bruises all over my body for the next 3 weeks). About 9pm I cut my wrist open and took another bottle of pills. And then sat down at the computer to write a suicide letter. 18 hours later I was found still typing on the computer by my mother.

I remember telling her what I had done and that there was something very wrong with me. She called my regular doctor to make an appointment. The next day, Monday, my mother got me up and helped me bathe. I got on the scale and saw I had lost 30lbs in the past 7 weeks while I was on Paxil. I was so weak I was unable to walk alone.

My mother took me to my regular MD. She said I had a Paxil induced psychosis and to quit taking it right away. She gave me Zoloft in case I crashed from going cold turkey. I never took any Zoloft. I was too afraid. These behaviors were not me. They were not things I would have done no matter how depressed I was.

It has been 8 months since all of this happened. I am not on any meds or feel like I need them. However, I have some shocking sensations but not as bad as the 2 months right after quitting the Paxil. My memory is terrible. I can’t remember what I did yesterday, or words when I start a sentence. I can’t juggle tasks. My problem solving ability is gone. And I am uncomfortable in large groups of people. It feels like everything is closing in.

I am psychologically fine. The only good things that came from this is that I know I am strong enough to fight anything. And depression is something I can handle on my own. Nothing is as awful as life was on Paxil.

Tammy
Liptonlips@aol.com

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 67.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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