ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Son Beats Mother: Drives Car into Abutment: CAN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from
antidepressants can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over months
or years depending on length of use, under the supervision of a qualified
and experienced specialist, if available.

Withdrawal is often more severe than the
original symptoms or problems.
Refer to
CD on safe withdrawal for guidelines “Help! I Can‘t Get Off My

Antidepressant!”

Paragraph 11 reads:  “According to an agreed statement,
Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told police that his son never had a good
relationship with his mother, suffers from severe depression and
doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/pleads+guilty+attacking+mother/2295992/story.html

Man, 28, pleads guilty to attacking his mother

Woman told police she feared for her life

By Andrew Seymour,
The Ottawa CitizenDecember 3, 2009

OTTAWA ­ The 28-year-old son of a
former high tech executive has pleaded guilty to assault causing bodily harm,
for grabbing his mother by the neck, smashing her head on the floor, covering
her nose and mouth to prevent her from breathing and throwing her down a flight
of stairs.

Roman Osadca admitted he was angry at his mother Elizabeth
Osadca on Oct. 7, 2008 after learning his ex-girlfriend had married. So he
charged toward his mother and tossed her on the floor, repeatedly punching and
shaking her head from side to side before placing both hands over her nose and
mouth.

When his mother ­ who described seeing stars and began losing
consciousness ­ fought back by kicking and punching him, he threw her down
the basement stairs.

According to an agreed statement of facts, Elizabeth
Osadca lay dazed at the bottom of the stairs for a few minutes before being able
to quietly climb the stairs and then run to a neighbour’s house to call
police.

Roman Osadca, who had already fled the home in a car, eventually
crashed into a light standard near the corner of Carling Avenue and Moodie
Drive. The light pole fell and hit another car.

Osadca ended up in the
same emergency ward at the Queensway-Carleton hospital as his mother, who had
suffered a cut to the back of her head, a bruised and swollen eye as well as a
red, swollen bump and small cigarette burn to her forehead.

Elizabeth
Osadca ­ who court heard Wednesday doesn’t want her son to go to jail ­
told police she was fearful for her life and believed that her son was going to
kill her.

Following his arrest, Osadca admitted attacking his mother,
telling police he “should have stopped after the first punch,” but never
intended to kill her.

The day of the attack, Roman Osadca had learned his
ex-girlfriend had married a man from the Dominican Republic. Osadca’s mother had
discovered the information and told the woman to tell her son about the new
relationship ­ and he blamed her for what happened.

Police went to
Elizabeth Osadca’s house afterward and found a large hole in the kitchen wall as
well as a knife planted in the wall of the stairs leading to the basement.

According to an agreed statement, Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told
police that his son never had a good relationship with his mother, suffers from
severe depression and doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.

Danny
Osadca is the founder of the Osadca Group, a Nepean consulting group. He is also
a former chief executive of Med Eng Systems.

Calling the attack a “once
in a lifetime situation,” Roman Osadca’s lawyer Rod Sellar said his “extremely
remorseful” client ­ who apologized in court for his actions ­ is
receiving treatment for depression. Osadca, who has also pleaded guilty to
dangerous driving, should receive a conditional sentence, Sellar argued. But
assistant Crown attorney Shawn Eagles argued a six-month jail term was more
appropriate given the prolonged nature of the “vicious attack” and the “profound
breach of trust” in a child’s attacking his own mother.

Sentencing is set
for Dec. 7.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa
Citizen

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Makes Teenage Girl Angry All the Time: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How tragic that this poor young woman would have to turn to
the Dear Abby column (or whatever they call it now) for help with this! Why
would her own doctor not know enough to explain to her that this antidepressant
is causing her blood sugar to drop producing adrenalin rushes as the body’s
attempt to normalize sugar? Since adrenalin is your fight or flight hormone it
is no wonder she is angry all the time and no wonder it affects relationships as
the patients become meaner and meaner when they cannot control their blood sugar
levels due to the effects of these drugs.

You ask if she has been screened for diabetes? I may not show
up yet, but soon will with her pancreas experiencing that strong of a negative
effect from the antidepressant. This is a very bright young woman to be able to
notice what effect this drug is having upon her. And her mother may change her
mind about having her daughter take the antidepressant when her daughter
violently attacks her in a rage produced by the drug! What a shame her
mother is not listening to her as she cries out for help knowing what
violence the drugs are causing her to be capable of, yet frightened to verbalize
those horribly violent thoughts previously so completely foreign to
her.
__________________________________
Last part of paragraph two reads:  ” However, the
antidepressant causes me to be uncontrollably angry
all the time.
I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which just adds to
my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect my
relationships with friends and family.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091130/LIFE/911300302/-1/ENTERTAIN

Teen frets taking her antidepressants

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
November 30, 2009 12:00
AM

Dear Annie: I am a 16-year-old girl who still wets the bed. I have
tried everything from wearing an alarm to taking medication.

I am now on
a prescription that works by telling my kidneys to stop producing urine,
although it doesn’t work all the time. A urologist prescribed an antidepressant

that prevents me from sleeping too deeply. With the combination of these two
medicines, I no longer wet the bed. However, the antidepressant causes me to be
uncontrollably angry all the time. I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which
just adds to my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect
my relationships with friends and family.

My mom wants me to keep taking
it because it works. But, Annie, I don’t like being angry all the time, and I
don’t want to be on medication for the rest of my life. What can I
do?

­ At a Loss

Dear At a Loss: Most teens with enuresis are
exceedingly deep sleepers, and many also have a small bladder, exacerbating the

problem. We assume you have been screened for diabetes and a genetic link, and
that you don’t drink alcohol. Many sufferers do well with a moisture-sensor
alarm, and we’re sorry that doesn’t work for you. The other common treatment is
the medication you currently are using. However, since you are having unpleasant
side effects, please discuss this with your doctor. It’s possible your dosage
can be altered so you can still get the benefits without such a big emotional
swing. Also discuss exercises to strengthen and enlarge your bladder. For more
information and to keep abreast of new developments, contact the National Kidney
Foundation (kidney.org) at 1-888-WAKE-DRY
(1-888-925-3379).

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PROZAC/SSRIs: Problematic [DEADLY!] For Bipolars: Dr. David Gratzer

NOTE FROM DR. TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

Problematic???!!!!!” How about using the term DEADLY? How did
we get to the point that using SSRIs is the standard “treatment” for Bipolar
patients when initially doctors would not prescribe them due to their strong
potential to induce Bipolar?! Time has certainly proven the initial fears to be
true when the number of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by a whopping
4000% from 1996 to 2004!! No wonder every third person you meet any more has the
Bipolar label!
The simple truth of the matter is (as I discuss at length in
my DVD “Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?”) that antidepressants –
especially the SSRI antidepressants – are by far the BIGGEST CAUSE on
this planet of Bipolar Disorder! And doctors prescribing these drugs as
“treatment” for Bipolar is not only unethical, it is downright criminal! Why
wouldn’t the placebo outperform the drug?! Placebos don’t CAUSE Bipolar Disorder
– Antidepressants do!
Paragraph 14 reads:  “As a physician myself, I know a
thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When I was in
residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs
. It turned out that

Prozac intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.”

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columns/Manhattan-Moment/Medicine-isn_t-perfect_-Obamacare-is-even-less-perfect-8582816-72875022.html

Dr. David Gratzer: Medicine isn’t perfect, Obamacare is even less
perfect

By: Dr. David Gratzer
Op-Ed Contributor
November 25, 2009

Pay for the blue pill that works, not the red one that
doesn’t. That’s the president’s simple prescription for improving American
health care, one that relies on government panels and committees to set
guidelines for doctors and patients alike.

At least, that’s the
theory.

The theory met messy reality last week when the U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force recommended that women in their 40s shouldn’t get
mammograms. But the secretary of health and human services — who, incidentally,
oversees this panel — thinks women probably should. And the American Cancer
Society believes that they definitely should; major private insurance companies,

for the record, will continue to fund the tests.

Confused
yet?

Recommendation from a largely unknown government panel hardly seems
like typical material for national headlines. But when it involves breast cancer
and the announcement is made in the heat of debate over health reform, people
are — understandably — concerned.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task
Force, as it turns out, is not part of a larger Obama White House rationing
conspiracy, as some would have it. Task force members were appointed by
President Bush, and they voted on this recommendation before Obama’s
inauguration.

As for cost considerations, the task force had none:
Members are mandated not to weigh dollars and cents when considering the risk
and benefits of recommendations.

That’s not to suggest that their
conclusion isn’t highly controversial. For starters, it seems counterintuitive:
Early screening for cancer makes sense.

No wonder, then, that a full 87
percent of Americans believed that routine scanning was “almost always a good
idea” in a 2004 poll published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

Today, American panels and doctors groups are moving away
from the “scan first, ask questions later” philosophy. We aren’t the only ones
having second thoughts.

In Japan, all newborns were screened for

neuroblastoma starting in 1984, but the program was scrapped a few years ago
when more babies died from unnecessary surgeries than the obscure
cancer.

For many, such reversals are deeply unsettling, a reminder that
medicine is far from an exact science.

“The history of medicine is a
record not only of brilliant success and stunning progress,” Theodore Dalrymple,
a British physician, wrote in 2002. “It is also a litany of mistaken ideas and
discarded treatments, some of which came to appear absurd or downright dangerous
after having once been hailed as unprecedented advances.”

As a physician
myself, I know a thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When
I was in residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs. It turned out that Prozac
intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.

For those on the left, the answer to the chaos of medicine is to
establish government panels. With Obamacare, for instance, White House officials
propose a commission to cut hundreds of billions from Medicare by improving the
quality of care.

How? By setting up an Independent Medicare Advisory
Commission that would guide clinical decisions for doctors and patients
alike.

The controversy over breast cancer screening, however, shows the
political and practical limitations of this one-size-fits-all approach: Medical
organizations have difficulty in setting and agreeing upon clinical guidelines,
and patients are apt to resent mandates from bureaucrats.

Leaving health
verdicts in the hands of centralized authorities is a sure way to keep making
mistakes in a field where re-examination and reversal are an unavoidable
reality.

David Gratzer, a physician, is a senior fellow at the
Manhattan Institute and author of “Why Obama’s Government Takeover of Health
Care Will Be a Disaster” (Encounter Books,
2009).

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: 22 Year Old Woman: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

When someone has been sickly physically for a period of
time or earlier in life it has been my experience that they do not do well
on antidepressants. They need to rebuild their health, not take a stimulant drug
to force their bodies to perform! Why do we push others as we do? Give them the
time they need to heal!
__________________________________
An inquest on Tuesday heard that Natalie, an animal lover, who
studied at Plumpton College, had suffered ill health as a child, which limited
her sight and held her back at school.
Paragraph seven reads:  “Dr Hunt told the inquest, “She
told me she had been depressed for several years and had been
taking anti-depressants for two
years.”

http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk/news/Animal-lover-took-own-life.5864785.jp

Animal lover took own life after party

Published Date: 27 November 2009

A ‘SENSITIVE
and quiet girl’ who spent years bravely fighting depression took her own life
just days after her 22nd birthday, an inquest heard.


Family and friends joined
popular Natalie McCreanney at her party at Bibendum in Eastbourne town centre on
November 21 last year.

A week later, her body was
found on a secluded part of the beach, near the foot of Beachy Head.

An inquest on Tuesday heard
that Natalie, an animal lover, who studied at Plumpton College, had suffered ill
health as a child, which limited her sight and held her back at school.

Natalie paid for regular
counselling sessions for several years at the Eastbourne Clinic, but these ended
a couple of months before her death as she was thought to be too dependent on
staff.

Her regular GP, Dr Christopher Bedford-Turner, said
Natalie had taken an overdose in 2005 and later self-harmed on occasions.

On November 24 last year, she had a 15-minute chat
with Dr Caroline Hunt, a locum working at Dr Bedford-Turner’s surgery.

Dr Hunt told the inquest, “She told me she had been
depressed for several years and had been taking anti-depressants for two
years.

“She said she had been feeling very low again. I
asked her if she had any suicidal thoughts. She was non-committal and shrugged
her shoulders.”

They discussed the possibility of increasing her
medication, Dr Hunt said, but Natalie hurried out of the surgery before the
consultation was over.

Her counsellor, Julia Ryder, said sessions with
Natalie ended after she had found a flat and a job.

“I felt it was no longer beneficial to consider
counselling indefinitely as it was not treating any specific depressive symptoms
and was more about her reliance on me and some of my colleagues.”

Mum Jackie paid tribute to her daughter, who had
‘struggled to come to terms with her illness’.

She said, “She was a quiet, sensitive girl with a
passion for animals and a group of supportive friends.”

In the last few months of her life, Natalie was
working at Debenhams and shared a flat in Barbuda Quay.

Second cousin Diane Mounir recounted an emotional
phone call Natalie made to her.
“I asked her if it was a good idea her being
there. She said, ‘I like it here’.

“She wanted to carry on talking but I cut her off
to phone 999. When I phoned her back, her phone was dead.”

Coroner Alan Craze said Natalie’s ‘general descent
into crisis’ had led to an ‘enormous tragedy’. He recorded a verdict of suicide,
while the balance of her mind was disturbed.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Young Man Missing – Voices said “eat sugar”: Iowa

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How bright of this prescribing physician! You have someone who
is disoriented so you give them a drug that
causes “disorientation”! So why would anyone wonder why this
young man got worse and then disappeared into the freezing weather with no
shoes or coat?
It does appear clear to me that the
antidepressant affected his blood sugar rapidly and strongly with the
heart palpitations and the cravings for sugar – both symptoms of a drop in blood

sugar levels. The brain cannot function without normal sugar levels and
immediately begins losing brain cells when the sugar level drops. And the body
pumps adrenalin – the fight or flight hormone – in an attempt to normalize the
sugar levels when they drop.

_______________________________________
Paragraphs three & four read:
Moncada’s mother, Ana Moncada, said he went to work on
Thanksgiving night; and, when he returned home on the morning of Nov. 27, he
seemed disoriented. She took him to see a doctor, who prescribed an
anti-depressant. He continued to feel disoriented and began to hear voices, she
said.”

“ ‘He was hearing voices that saideat sugar,

said Maria Stockton, a friend who served as translator for his mother.  ‘He
felt his heart was beating too hard and thought if he ate sugar, his heart
would not beat so hard’.”

http://www.southwestiowanews.com/articles/2009/12/09/council_bluffs/doc4b1fd2bc0a96e293364639.txt

Bluffs man reported missing

By TIM JOHNSON, Staff Writer
tjohnson@nonpareilonline.com
Published: Wednesday, December 9, 2009 10:59 AM CST
A young
Hispanic man from Council Bluffs has been reported missing.

Larry Ely
Murillo Moncada, 25, was last seen Saturday, Nov. 28, at 6:15 p.m. at his
residence at 719 N. 14th St., according to his family. He was wearing a Navy
blue hooded sweatshirt and light blue seat pants. He was described as 5-feet,
5-inches tall and 140 pounds, with brown eyes.

Moncada’s mother, Ana
Moncada, said he went to work on Thanksgiving night; and, when he returned home
on the morning of Nov. 27, he seemed disoriented. She took him to see a doctor,
who prescribed an anti-depressant. He continued to feel disoriented and began to
hear voices, she said.

“He was hearing voices that saideat sugar,’”

said Maria Stockton, a friend who served as translator for his mother. “He felt
his heart was beating too hard and thought if he ate sugar, his heart would not
beat so hard.”

He did not eat very much sugar, she said, but by Saturday,
he was hallucinating.

“He said somebody was following him, and he was
scared,” she said.

It was apparently this fear that led Murillo Moncada
to run out the door that evening without any shoes on, Stockton said.

The
family has checked with acquaintances and posted flyers at businesses they
frequent, but have heard nothing so far.

Anyone with information on his
whereabouts should contact Detective Shawn Landon of the Council Bluffs Police
Department at (712) 326-2508 or Crime Stoppers at (712)
328-STOP.

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SSRI Antidepressants Linked to Lactation Difficulties

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): The following
statement about the benefits of breastmilk are true. But when you are talking
about the benefits of breastmilk coming from a mother on SSRI antidepressants,
there is no basis for benefit from such contaminated milk. The baby is much
better off gathering milk from a mother who is drug free. The only additional
problem at that point is that if the baby survives and does not die from one of
the many horrific birth defects produced by these drugs they will then be
going cold turkey off one of these very addictive antidepressants. It would be
better to wean the baby slowly down off of the breast milk by giving smaller and
smaller amounts of the mother’s toxic contaminated milk while providing more and
more clean breast milk from a donor mom.

Let me give just one example of why I would say this: Over the weekend I
was able to visit once again with a mother of seven that I helped years ago
as she withdrew from her seven year use of Prozac. After she had been completely
off the drug for a year and a half she gave birth to her last child. When the
baby was three weeks old she was passing more blood than stool. Both the family
physician and the pediatrician agreed that it was the Prozac residue in the
mother’s breast milk that was eating away the baby’s intestinal lining to cause
the bleeding. They confirmed this by having the mother gather clean breast milk

to supplement her milk with. Almost immediately after mixing the milk half and
half the bleeding stopped. So, assisting a mother to breastfeed when her milk is
so contaminated may not be in the best interest of the baby after all.

_______________________________
Breastfeeding benefits both infants and mothers in many ways as breast milk
is easy to digest and contains antibodies that can protect infants from
bacterial and viral infections. The World Health Organization recommends that
infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. This
new study shows that certain common antidepressant drugs may be linked to a
common difficulty experienced by new mothers known as delayed secretory
activation, defined as a delay in the initiation of full milk secretion.
Public release date: 26-Jan-2010

Contact:
Aaron Lohr
alohr@endo-society.org
240-482-1380
The
Endocrine Society

Common antidepressant drugs linked to lactation difficulties in
moms

According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), women
taking commonly used forms of antidepressant drugs may experience delayed
lactation after giving birth and may need additional support to achieve their
breastfeeding goals.

Breastfeeding benefits both infants and mothers in many ways as breast milk
is easy to digest and contains antibodies that can protect infants from
bacterial and viral infections. The World Health Organization recommends that
infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. This
new study shows that certain common antidepressant drugs may be linked to a
common difficulty experienced by new mothers known as delayed secretory
activation, defined as a delay in the initiation of full milk secretion.

“The breasts are serotonin-regulated glands, meaning the breasts’ ability to
secrete milk at the right time is closely related to the body’s production and
regulation of the hormone serotonin,” said Nelson Horseman, PhD, of the
University of Cincinnati and co-author of the study. “Common antidepressant
drugs like fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine are known as selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs and while they can affect mood,
emotion and sleep they may also impact serotonin regulation in the breast,
placing new mothers at greater risk of a delay in the establishment of a full
milk supply.”

In this study, researchers examined the effects of SSRI drugs on lactation
using laboratory studies of human and animal cell lines and genetically modified
mice. Furthermore, an observational study evaluated the impact of SSRI drugs on
the onset of milk production in postpartum women. In this study of 431
postpartum women, median onset of lactation was 85.8 hours postpartum for the
SSRI-treated mothers and 69.1 hours for mothers not treated with SSRI drugs.
Researchers commonly define delayed secretory activation as occurring later than
72 hours postpartum.

SSRI drugs are very helpful medications for many moms, so understanding and
ameliorating difficulties moms experience can help them achieve their goals for
breastfeeding their babies,” said Horseman. “More human research is needed
before we can make specific recommendations regarding SSRI use during
breastfeeding.”

###

Other researchers working on the study include: Aaron Marshall, Laura
Hernandez and Karen Gregerson of the University of Cincinnati in Ohio; Laurie
Nommsen-Rivers of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio; Kathryn
Dewey of the University of California at Davis; and Caroline Chantry of the
University of California Davis Medical Center in Sacramento.

The article, “Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland
modulates secretory activation and involution,” will appear in the February 2010
issue of JCEM.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and
most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical
practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of
over 14,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than
100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied, and clinical
interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase,
Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit
our site at www.endo-society.org.

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Brittany Murphy Cause of Death? Serotonin Syndrome?

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Brittany Murphy‘s husband and mother are saying they do not think Brittany
died as a result of the drugs she was taking. Let me explain why they are wrong.
What a shame they do not have this information.

#1 Brittany had mitral valve prolapse where a heart valve does not close
properly like the drugs Fen-Phen and Redux produced that killed so
many people. And what did Dr. Heidi Connelly from the Mayo Clinic find that
these drugs did to produce the heart valve problem?

She found that it was the increased levels of serotonin produced by
the drugs that caused a gummy gooey glossy substance to build up on the heart
valves so that they could not close properly.

What do Prozac (Sarafem) and Robitussin both increase? Serotonin levels
and taken together they can produce serious reactions or even kill you due to
the elevated levels of serotonin the mix of these two drugs can
produce.

#2 The day after Brittany died a new study was released demonstrating an
increase in heart failure for women taking antidepressants and anti-anxiety
medications. Brittany was on both Sarafem (Prozac marketed for PMS) and Klonopin
(an anti-anxiety medication – not sure who told Brittany‘s husband that this
drug is an anti-seizure med).

#3 Flu-like symptoms are often symptoms of a toxic reaction to medications.
This is never stressed enough to patients! In treating the flu-like symptoms,
that could easily have been a toxic reaction to meds, with Robitussin which
contains the serotonergic agent dextromethorphan, it could have pushed Brittany
over the edge leading to multiple organ failure that comes from elevated levels

of serotonin – the same thing that killed Anna Nicole Smith’s young son,
Daniel.

________________________________________

Murphy had mitral valve prolapse, a common condition where a heart valve does
not properly close, but doctors said the actress “would live a long and healthy
life,” Monjack said.

He said his wife took the anti-seizure medication klonopin ever since an
episode she had while filming “8 Mile.” She also occasionally took Sarafem, a
drug aimed at pain and mood swings during menstrual periods, Monjack said.

He said he did not think a harmful interaction of drugs played a role in his
wife’s death. She had been sick with flu-like symptoms in the days before her

death and had been taking Robitussin, but nothing more, he said.

Brittany‘s mom, husband say drugs didn’t kill her

By ANTHONY McCARTNEY | Posted: Wednesday, January 20,
2010 9:35 am | No Comments Posted

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Simon Monjack, left, husband of deceased actress Brittany
Murphy and Murphy‘s mother Sharon pose with a portrait of the actress in Los
Angeles, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010. Monjack said the portrait by photographer Bruce
Weber was Murphy‘s favorite photo of herself. (AP Photo/Chris
Pizzello)

A month after Brittany Murphy‘s mysterious death, her mother and husband say
they are convinced the actress died of natural causes, not drugs or an eating
disorder.

In an interview with The Associated Press on Tuesday, Sharon Murphy and Simon
Monjack said that Murphy did not use drugs or alcohol and that they are awaiting
a determination from coroner’s officials that will end speculation prescription
medicine caused Murphy‘s death on Dec. 20 at age 32.

Monjack said some of the prescription medications found in the couple’s
Hollywood Hills home belonged to him.

Murphy had mitral valve prolapse, a common condition where a heart valve does
not properly close, but doctors said the actress “would live a long and healthy
life,” Monjack said.

“She had a fear of dying,” Sharon Murphy said. “She would not take too much
caffeine. She wouldn’t even have a glass of champagne on New Year’s. She was
just high on life, and people see that as something else I guess.”

Murphy, the star of varied films such as “Clueless,” “8 Mile,” “Sin City” and
the television series “King of the Hill,” was buried in a private funeral on
Christmas Eve. At the service, Monjack told mourners that the actress was his
best friend and soul mate, sentiments he repeated during the Tuesday
interview.

Monjack, who married Murphy in 2007, said police and coroner’s officials have
not contacted the family to say his wife’s death was from anything other than
natural causes.

Authorities continue to investigate her death but do not suspect foul play.
An autopsy was inconclusive and coroner’s officials are awaiting the results of
toxicology and tissue tests before determining what killed the actress.

Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter said Tuesday that he had not seen Murphy‘s
autopsy report, but the condition of her heart would be looked at before her
cause of death is determined.

Sharon Murphy described the wait for answers as torture. “We wish we knew,”
she said.

“She was alive one minute and she was dead the next,” Monjack said.

The pair worked frantically to save Murphy‘s life the morning she died, as
revealed in a heart-wrenching 911 call where Sharon Murphy implores, “Brittany,
please come back!” as Monjack performs CPR.

Sharon Murphy said she has largely ignored tabloid reports that have
suggested her daughter abused drugs or had an eating disorder. She said her
daughter had always been petite and ate often, but burned it off with an active
lifestyle.

Monjack, who has read some of the reports, called them lies based on
anonymous sources who weren’t close to Brittany Murphy or him. He said he is
considering suing some British outlets for “outright fabrications.”

He said the rumors of her drug use were unfounded and had cost his wife roles
in some major films.

He said he is also considering whether to sue the Los Angeles County
Coroner’s Department over an initial report that was obtained by celebrity Web
site TMZ.com, which
listed several prescription medications found in Murphy‘s home. Monjack said
most of the medicines listed in the report were his.

He said his wife took the anti-seizure medication klonopin ever since an
episode she had while filming “8 Mile.” She also occasionally took Sarafem, a
drug aimed at pain and mood swings during menstrual periods, Monjack said.

Klonopin has been cited in several celebrity overdose deaths, but with many
other medications mixed in.

He said he did not think a harmful interaction of drugs played a role in his
wife’s death. She had been sick with flu-like symptoms in the days before her
death and had been taking Robitussin, but nothing more, he said.

Monjack and Sharon Murphy remain in the Hollywood Hills home where Brittany

Murphy collapsed a month ago. They share grief and memories of Murphy, speaking
highly of each other. Monjack calls Murphy his soul mate; Sharon Murphy calls
her daughter “my other half.”

DVDs of some of Brittany Murphy‘s films lay near the entertainment center,
and several framed photographic portraits of the actress that Monjack shot adorn
the walls and other areas of the living room.

“I’m comforted by these photographs,” Monjack said. “I’m comforted by the
transformation from girl to woman that I witnessed.”

The couple planned to display for exhibition some of the
photographs, which can be seen at http://www.simonmonjackphotography.com.

It was just one of the couple’s plans, which included starting a family and
moving to New York. Sharon Murphy said her daughter was talking about having a
child the night before she died. Monjack said they already had baby names picked
out.

Now the pair are planning a public memorial to celebrate Brittany Murphy‘s
life, which will be held in the Los Angeles area at the end of February. Monjack
and Sharon Murphy said they have asked many of the actress’ friends to refrain
from making public comments, but that they expect the memorial will remind
people of her talents and beauty.

Monjack said the memorial will coincide with the launch of the Brittany
Murphy Foundation, a charitable group that he said will support arts education
for children and other causes his wife believed in.

Both Monjack and Sharon Murphy said they expect respect to grow for Brittany
Murphy‘s work and life, once questions about her death are settled. The actress
had completed two unreleased films before her death but their prospects are
uncertain.

Sharon Murphy expressed reluctance about their release because of the
filmmakers’ inexperience, but Monjack said he would approve if the releases were
respectfully done and the profits donated to the Brittany Murphy Foundation.

“I think the dust will settle, the truth will come out,” Monjack said. “I
think people will come to realize the genius of Brittany Murphy and come to
regret the way they treated her while she was alive.”

Posted in Movies on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 9:35 am
Updated: 10:06 am.
| Tags:

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ZOLOFT: 12 Year Old Boy Kills 5 Week Old Infant: Georgia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

I could not even begin to count the number of times that a
child on Zoloft has told me of both thoughts and plans to kill that they
developed on Zoloft. Eric Harris, the lead shooter at Columbine, had those
thoughts within three weeks on Zoloft and found them to be so disturbing to him
that he reported it and they took him off Zoloft and put him on another
antidepressant. [What is the definition of insanity? Doing the same thing and
expecting a different result – the other antidepressant, Luvox, ended up
producing thoughts of killing intense enough to result in the largest school
shooting the world had ever witnessed at that point.] I even had a case of a 5

year old boy in Southern Utah who had such intense feelings of homicide that he
told his family he was going to have the police come and kill them
all.

Check out our database of cases at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org to find more cases
like this of children killing while under the influence of
antidepressants.
Paragraph 29 reads:  “While the boy continued to refuse,
Curtis spoke to police when he was out of the room. She told them the boy was in
counseling, that he had been fighting at school, that he had been prescribed

Zoloft and a mood stabilizing medicine. Then, Curtis provided a tearful account
of what he said happened.”

http://www.tampabay.com/news/courts/criminal/infants-mother-testifies-as-tampa-boy-stands-trial-in-georgia-murder/1057496

Infant‘s mother testifies as Tampa boy stands trial in Georgia

death

By Alexandra
Zayas
, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Thursday,
December 10, 2009

MARIETTA, Ga. ­ On the Fourth of July, Brittiany
Young returned to her car in a Target parking lot and put it in reverse. That’s
when she noticed the swollen mouth of her 5weekold daughter,
Millan.

Young put the car in park and turned to her cousin, a 12yearold

Tampa boy she had left alone with the baby.

“What did you do?” she asked.
“What did you do to her?”

The mother testified Wednesday morning in a
Cobb County, Ga., courtroom, where the Tampa boy faces charges of felony murder
and cruelty to children. He has pleaded not guilty. Juvenile Court Judge A.
Gregory Poole will decide the case without a jury.

The unidentified boy
­ a court order keeps his name secret ­ was visiting relatives July 4
outside Atlanta when his cousin stopped at the Target to pick up food for a
picnic. According to court testimony, the 22-yearold mother left the keys in
the ignition and the air conditioning on as she shopped at the store for 18
minutes. When Young returned, the boy was playing on his cell phone in the back
seat. The radio was turned louder. And the infant was not responsive.

The
baby girl was taken off life support the next day. A medical examiner found
multiple skull fractures and ruled the cause of death blunt force trauma to the
head.

The boy has remained in Georgia since July, first locked up in a
juvenile detention center, then transferred to a secure group
home.

Authorities said nothing specific about how they think the baby
died until Wednesday morning.

“Something so horrific happened that
pictures don’t do it justice,” prosecutor Eleanor Odom said in her opening
statement. “That child’s head was bashed in.”

The boy‘s attorney, Derek
Wright, had another word to describe the prosecution’s case:
“Impossible.”

He said prosecutors would not be able to provide a scenario
showing exactly what act of violence befell the baby ­ no weapon, no points
of impact in the car.

By Wednesday night, they still had not.

• •

In the courtroom, the sixth-grader wore a gold suit ­ like the one
he wore to his elementary school graduation.

When his mother, his father
and his great-aunt cried ­ when the baby’s mother cried ­ he remained
composed.

But emergency responders who first arrived at the scene
testified that they saw him pacing and sobbing. They noted a different, more
calm reaction from the mother. Paramedic Pierce Summers saw her later at the
hospital.

“For someone that had had a child in that circumstance, it was
surprising,” he said, “like she was kind of lost in a fog.”

Young
described what her baby looked like in the car: eyes swollen and hard to the
touch; blood on her mouth or nose; limp.

On July 5, the baby girl was
deemed brain dead and taken off life support. The prosecutor asked the mother,
“Were you there when Millan died?”

She paused to wipe tears. Then, she
said, “yes.”

After the judge ordered a break and the infant‘s mother left
the stand, the boy burst into tears. He stood up, turned around and looked at
his mother, who stood up from a bench and kissed his forehead.

• •

For much of the day and into the night, the prosecution focused on
three videotaped interviews the boy gave detectives.

The third was the
subject of an hourslong debate. The defense fought hard to have it suppressed,
saying the boy was forced to give incriminating statements.

During the
first, the boy told detectives what he told the baby’s mother: The baby began to
cry, so he tried to give her a pacifier. She spit it out, so he tried to give
her a bottle of water. She kept screaming, and was scratching her face. He
turned the radio loud, and it appeared she went to sleep.

The boy‘s story
didn’t stray far from his original account in his second interview, which he
gave the day after the baby was pronounced dead.

“If you accidentally
hurt Millan, would you tell us?” the detective asked.

“Yes,” the boy

said. “I didn’t accidentally hurt her. . . . I don’t want to hurt a
baby.”

But a couple of hours after he gave that interview ­ while
their entire family was gathered at the baby’s mother’s house ­ the boy‘s
mother, Camille Curtis, brought him back to speak with police. This time, she
was crying. She said he had told her something.

“It was just an
accident,” Curtis said. “He said he was scared. I asked him. He told me. He
thought I was going to be mad.”

Detectives asked the boy if he wanted to
talk. The boy shook his head.

While the boy continued to refuse, Curtis
spoke to police when he was out of the room. She told them the boy was in
counseling, that he had been fighting at school, that he had been prescribed

Zoloft and a mood stabilizing medicine. Then, Curtis provided a tearful account
of what he said happened.

She said he told her the baby started choking
when he tried to give her the bottle. He lifted her to his chest to burp her,
and she fell out of his hands.

The boy told the baby’s mother he was
sorry, Curtis said.

At that point in the videotape, the police told her
that this story didn’t match the injuries. The video shows her pleading with her
son to tell the police the truth, that he wouldn’t be allowed to go home until
he did.

He tells her he wiped the baby’s blood with a blanket, and that
he accidentally hit her with his elbow while trying to pick her up off the
floor.

Just before midnight on the videotape, when it appeared the boy
was about to talk, the judge stopped the tape.

“I find this to be
inherently unfair,” the judge said. “This child is so scared . . . literally in
a corner. His mother is pressuring him. How many times does the kid say he
doesn’t want to talk?”

With that, the judge struck the entire third
interview from the record. None of it will factor into the decision he will make
this week.

The trial continues today.

Alexandra Zayas can be
reached at azayas@sptimes.com or (813) 310-2081.

[Last modified: Dec
09, 2009 11:29 PM]

________________________________________

Judge’s
Verdict: Guilty, but not of murder

Dressed in a shirt and tie, the skinny, dimpled boy stayed calm as the
judge delivered his verdict: “I find beyond a reasonable doubt that Millan
suffered major trauma during the 18 minutes the juvenile was alone with the
baby. … I find that the juvenile caused the injuries and that the baby later
died as a result of the trauma.

“Now, what do I think happened? This child was left alone with the baby.
I don’t know that should have happened, but it did …

“Millan, a child he really didn’t know, started crying, and it got louder

“He didn’t know what to do. I think he was scared. He tried using the
pacifier to make this baby stop crying. It didn’t work. What did he do
next?

“He got out the bottle of water … He gives it to the baby. The baby won’t
be quiet. Turns up the radio so he won’t have to hear this baby crying. That
didn’t work. He might have even turned it up again. Well, the pink pacifier
didn’t work. Let’s use the purple pacifier …

“This juvenile was trying to get the baby to quit crying. … He was
scared, and he didn’t know what to do. … I wouldn’t expect him to know what to
do.

“I find that in order to get the baby to be quiet, using his own means as
a 12yearold, that he committed batteries, plural, against this baby

“Did this child mean that his actions would kill Millan? No …

“Technically, I think I can find possibly if I wanted to go further, some
type of an involuntary manslaughter. In my mind, I’ve still got to place this
child with some expectation, some appreciation for the horrific damage that it
has done, and I find nothing along those lines.

“Did he do wrong? Oh yeah, he did. I wish it hadn’t happened, but it
did.”

Tampa
boy, 12, found not guilty of murder in infant‘s death

By Alexandra Zayas,
Times Staff Writer
In Print:
Saturday, December 12, 2009

MARIETTA,
Ga. — The 12yearold Tampa boy sat in the Cobb County Juvenile Courthouse
Friday morning, still an accused baby murderer. A few hours later, he chomped on
potato chips and Skittles and asked to go to the all-you-can-eat buffet at
Golden Corral. He told his family he had plans for his future.

“I want to
be a judge,” he said. “I want to go to Harvard.”

This
announcement came after one made by Judge A. Gregory Poole: The boy was not
guilty of murder and child cruelty in the July death of his 5weekold cousin,
Millan
Young. He was guilty of a lesser offense, two counts of battery, which could
carry a two-year sentence, served either in a detention center, a group home, or
as probation while living with family. The sentence will come with
counseling.

The judge
will decide it on Jan. 6.

Had the boy
been convicted of murder, he would have faced nine years in detention.

As they
prepared to leave the courthouse, the boy‘s grandmother wrapped him in a tight
hug and told him, “See how God delivered you?”

He
responded, “Yes, ma’am.”

• • •

For three
days, lawyers tried to convince a judge of what they thought happened inside a
parked car on July 4.

The boy, his
name kept secret by court order, was visiting relatives near Atlanta when he got
into a car with his mother’s 22-yearold first cousin Brittiany Young and her
infant daughter. Young stopped at Target to get food and left the car
running.

When she
returned, she testified, the boy was playing on his cell phone. The radio was
turned up. And the baby’s mouth was swollen. Her lips were blue. Her eyes were
hard to the touch. She was limp and not breathing. The baby died the following
day.

Three
doctors testified about the child’s injuries: two types of brain hemorrhages,
retinal hemorrhages, unrelated fractures on opposite sides of her head, and
bruising of the mouth and other parts of her body. Tissue on her upper lip was
bruised, something that happens when babies are force-fed.

They said
the injuries weren’t accidental but couldn’t determine who caused them. The
medical examiner called it a homicide, finding that the child must have been
held firmly, shaken and slammed at least twice against a hard, flat surface.

Crime lab
tests found no physical evidence in the car. Prosecutors had testimony that the
baby was acting normally before the mother left the car and was unresponsive
when she returned.

In closing
statements Friday, defense attorney Derek Wright tried to convince the judge
that prosecutors didn’t prove the boy was the murderer. He said he could make a
case against the baby’s mother, noting that several emergency responders said
Young was acting unusually calm when they arrived, but that the boy was sobbing
and pacing. He suggested the possibility that the baby was injured at the
mother’s home minutes away but didn’t show signs of trauma until the parking
lot.

The baby’s
mother sat in the courtroom on a bench closest to the door. She stared ahead
with tears in her eyes as Wright said she could have let her cousin take the
blame.

Prosecutor
Eleanor Odom argued that the baby’s mother didn’t appear distraught because she
didn’t yet know the extent of the baby’s injuries, but that the boy already
did.

Odom took a
blood-stained, pink onesie out of an evidence bag and showed it to the
judge.

“You can see
the size, how big Millan really was,” Odom said. “I think this speaks more words
than those pictures ever could.”

Dressed in a
shirt and tie, the skinny, dimpled boy stayed calm as the judge delivered his
verdict: “I find beyond a reasonable doubt that Millan suffered major trauma
during the 18 minutes the juvenile was alone with the baby. … I find that the
juvenile caused the injuries and that the baby later died as a result of the
trauma.

“Now, what
do I think happened? This child was left alone with the baby. I don’t know that
should have happened, but it did …

“Millan, a
child he really didn’t know, started crying, and it got louder …

“He didn’t
know what to do. I think he was scared. He tried using the pacifier to make this
baby stop crying. It didn’t work. What did he do next?

“He got out
the bottle of water … He gives it to the baby. The baby won’t be quiet. Turns up
the radio so he won’t have to hear this baby crying. That didn’t work. He might
have even turned it up again. Well, the pink pacifier didn’t work. Let’s use the
purple pacifier …

“This
juvenile was trying to get the baby to quit crying. … He was scared, and he
didn’t know what to do. … I wouldn’t expect him to know what to do.

“I find that
in order to get the baby to be quiet, using his own means as a 12yearold, that
he committed batteries, plural, against this baby …

“Did this
child mean that his actions would kill Millan? No …

“Technically, I
think I can find possibly if I wanted to go further, some type of an involuntary
manslaughter. In my mind, I’ve still got to place this child with some
expectation, some appreciation for the horrific damage that it has done, and I
find nothing along those lines.

“Did he do
wrong? Oh yeah, he did. I wish it hadn’t happened, but it did.”

Once the
judge stopped talking, the boy started to cry. His parents embraced him, also in
tears. His mother smiled.

The baby’s
mother left the courtroom after the verdict and declined to comment. The boy‘s
grandmother said the family planned to gather at Brittiany Young’s home later
that day.

The judge
needed to decide where the boy would stay until the sentencing. He was
originally locked up in a juvenile detention center, but later transferred to a
secured group home.

A
representative from the group home told the judge the boy had a tough transition
into his school and, due to the stresses of his case, sometimes shut down
emotionally. But he said the boy was a role model and standout student.

The judge
allowed him to return to the group home and said he was welcome to visit with
family. He told the boy his behavior in the next month will be important in
deciding a sentence. The boy promised to be good.

Then, the
boy‘s attorney told the family, “Y’all go breathe.”

• • •

The boy‘s
grandmother, Joyce Hightower, couldn’t sleep Thursday night. She’d driven from
Tampa earlier that day and spent the night reading news about the case and
praying.

Now, holding
her grandson’s hand, she asked him how he felt.

“Good,” he
told her. “Anxious.”

“Anxious for
what?” she asked.

He said, “To
go home.”

Alexandra
Zayas can be reached at azayas@sptimes.com or (813)
310-2081.

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Bravo! Bravo! Bravo! European Parliament to Investigate WHO & “Pandemic” Scandal

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Well it appears that Senator Grassley’s persistent questioning
about ties between academic scientists, the pharma industry, and the
FDA has caught on in Europe. The EU Parliment has UNANIMOUSLY called for an
investigation and now the hard questions are having to be answered in the
bogus Swine Flu Pandemic.
And as we were warned in Rev. 18:23 & 24 this great
deception that will cover the earth in our day concerning “sorceries” (the Greek
translation being “pharmakia” – meaning medicine from a pharmacy) is
becoming more obvious by the minute as we are shown the close ties
between those who are suppose to declare safety, science and truth about them
and those who profit from them.
The reason for the deception
is made clear as day – $$$$$$$.
With new information continuing to come out and estimates that
50% of the new medical research is not real research, but instead bogus
infomercials that have been ordered and paid for by the drug industry, it is
apparent that t
his whole medical-industrial complex is
completely broken and corrupt to the core!
Ann Blake-Tracy
_____________________________
The Health Committee of the EU Parliament has
unanimously passed a resolution calling for the inquiry. The step is a
long-overdue move to public transparency of a “Golden Triangle” of drug
corruption between WHO [World Health Organization], the pharma industry and
academic scientists that has permanently damaged the lives of millions and even
caused death.

European Parliament to Investigate WHO and “Pandemic”
Scandal

  • Text
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F.
William Engdahl

Global Research
December 31, 2009

The
Council of Europe member states will launch an inquiry in January 2010 on the
influence of the pharmaceutical companies on the global swine flu campaign,
focusing especially on extent of the pharma‘s industry’s influence on WHO. The
Health Committee of the EU Parliament has unanimously passed a resolution
calling for the inquiry. The step is a long-overdue move to public transparency
of a “Golden Triangle” of drug corruption between WHO, the pharma industry and
academic scientists that has permanently damaged the lives of millions and even
caused death.

The
parliament motion was introduced by Dr. Wolfgang Wodarg, former SPD Member of
the German Bundestag and now Chairman of the European Parliament Health
Committee. Wodarg is a medical doctor and epidemiologist, a specialist in lung
disease and environmental medicine, who considers the current “pandemic” Swine
Flu campaign of the WHO to be “one of the greatest medicine scandals of the
Century.”[1]

The text of the resolution just passed by a sufficient number in the
Council of Europe Parliament says among other things, “In order to promote their
patented drugs and vaccines against flu, pharmaceutical companies influenced
scientists and official agencies, responsible for public health standards to
alarm governments worldwide and make them squander tight health resources for
inefficient vaccine strategies and needlessly expose millions of healthy people
to the risk of an unknown amount of side-effects of insufficiently tested
vaccines. The “bird-flu”-campaign (2005/06) combined with the
“swine-flu”-campaign seem to have caused a great deal of damage not only to some
vaccinated patients and to public health-budgets, but to the credibility and
accountability of important international health-agencies.”[2]

The
Parliamentary inquiry will look into the issue of „falsified pandemic“ that was
declared by WHO in June 2009 on the advice of its group of academic experts,
SAGE, many of whose members have been documented to have intense financial ties
to the same pharmaceutical giants such as GlaxoSmithKline, Roche, Novartis, who
benefit from the production of drugs and untested H1N1 vaccines. They will
investigate the influence of the pharma industry in creation of a worldwide
campaign against the so-called H5N1 “Avian Flu” and H1N1 Swine Flu. The inquiry
will be given “urgent” priority in the general assembly of the parliament.

In
his official statement to the Committee, Wodarg criticized the influence of the
pharma industry on scientists and officials of WHO, stating that it has led to
the situation where “unnecessarily millions of healthy people are exposed to the
risk of poorly tested vaccines,” and that, for a flu strain that is “vastly less
harmful” than all previous flu epidemics.

Wodarg
says the role of the WHO and its the pandemic emergency declaration in June
needs to be the special focus of the European Parliamentary inquiry. For the
first time, the WHO criteria for a pandemic was changed in April 2009 as the
first Mexico cases were reported, to make not the actual risk of a disease but
the number of cases of the disease basis to declare “Pandemic.” By classifying
the swine flu as pandemic, nations were compelled to implement pandemic plans
and also the purchase swine flu vaccines. Because WHO is not subject to any
parliamentary control, Wodarg argues it is necessary for governments to insist
on accountability. The inquiry will also to look at the role of the two critical
agencies in Germany issuing guidelines on the pandemic, the Paul-Ehrlich and the
Robert-Koch Institute.

Bravo!

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PROZAC & 6 other drugs: Toxicology of Brittany Murphy, Actress: California

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Why would anyone be surprised at this sudden heart attack in a
32 year old with this combination of drugs? This is far too similar
a combination of prescriptions that young healthy soldiers are returning
home on and dying in their sleep.
______________________________
Sentence three reads:  ” Included in the drug list that
TMZ reported were Topamax, anti-seizure medication, Klonopin and Ativan for
anxiety and the pain relievers Klonopin, Ativan, Vicoprofen,
Hydrocodone
.  Also,  depression medication
Fluoxetine [PROZAC ] and
hypertension medication Propranolol.”

http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474977959263&grpId=3659174697243100&nav=Groupspace

Brittany Murphy’s autopsy report is on LOCKDOWN!  The
list of prescription drugs that were found in the house were leaked to TMZ and
made public.  Included in the drug list that TMZ reported were Topamax,
anti-seizure medication, Klonopin and Ativan for anxiety and the pain relievers

Klonopin, Ativan, Vicoprofen, Hydrocodone.  Also,
depression medication Fluoxetine and hypertension medication
Propranolol.

TMZ received notes laying out the timeline of
Brittany’s death on Sunday morning.  The information was apparently
confidential and was not authorized for the media to publish.  The
investigators don’t know where the information came from or how TMZ got a hold
of the information.

TMZ would not say where the information was
obtained.

The investigators are not confirming that the prescription drug
list that was leaked is the same as to what they found at the house.  The
investigators are now searching for whoever leaked the
information.

Toxicology tests may take 4-8 weeks to confirm exact cause
of death.  For now, Brittany has died from “natural” causes meaning there
is not visual trauma to her body leading to her death.

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