LEXAPRO: Judge Experience​s Antidepres​sant-Induc​ed Hypomania

A doctor who is telling the truth about the hypomanic episode this
judge experienced from his antidepressant?!!!!! How refreshing that
the patient is getting the truth rather than being told he had an
“underlying” Bipolar Disorder that was manifest by his antidepressant
use!!!!! Why can’t other doctors be as honest and come right out and
tell the patient that their Bipolar symptoms have been brought on by
their antidepressant?

BUT when a patient experiences mania or hypomania from an
antidepressant, it is ABSOLUTELY INSANE to think they will not
experience it again on a different antidepressant! He and his family
had better hold their breaths!

What a shame when this happened that he did not have a copy of my DVD,
“Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?” If he had, the
DVD would have served as a warning for him about this common reaction
to both antidepressant use and abrupt withdrawal from antidepressants.

Why are these “Bipolar” patients not told they are suffering
continuous mild seizure activity which is what Bipolar Disorder is – a
sleep/seizure disorder brought on by the drugs?! ANTI-depressants are
stimulants, stimulants over stimulate the brain producing seizures.
The one time of day we all are in seizure activity is during REM sleep
– the dream state. So antidepressants are basically chemically
inducing the dream state during wakefulness.

By the way, the names “Mania” and “Hypomania” should be changed to
“Shear Hell on Earth!!!!!!!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of
Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I
Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder. . .

Blanche [Downing’s physician], though, describes the episode as a case
of antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Find this article at:

http://www.2theadvocate.com/features/people/Handling-hypomania.html?showAll=y&c=y

Former Judge Bob Downing explains episode that led to his resignation

By ELLYN COUVILLION
Advocate staff writer
Published: Mar 13, 2011 – Page: 1D

Comments (3)

Bob Downing, former 1st Circuit Court of Appeal judge, whose sudden
resignation from the bench last summer was surrounded by confusion,
can sort  out the events on a kind of timeline.

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder.

During the episode that lasted approximately three months, Downing
spent money wildly, alienated family, friends and employees and
resigned from the judicial bench, about the time he was hospitalized
and treated.

“It was a short period. It seemed like an eternity,” Downing, 61, said
recently from an office at the law firm of Dué, Price, Guidry,
Piedrahita and Andrews, where he’s working in an “of counsel” status.

In that capacity, Downing said that attorneys with the firm will work
with him on cases he brings in, but he is not on salary at the firm.
Downing handles personal injury cases.

Now being treated with medication for what was likely a one-time event
and back to feeling like himself, Downing said he recently decided to
speak out about his experience for several reasons.

“For people who have open heart surgery or stents, watch out for
depression,” Downing said.

One in five people experience an episode of depression after having
heart surgery, according to the website,http://www.psychcentral.com,
an independent mental health and psychology network run by mental
health professionals.

Downing also advises people taking antidepressants to stay in touch
with their doctor.

And, he said, “If you start feeling really wonderful and start
spending a lot of money, you need to see a counselor,” Downing said.

Hypomania is “a condition similar to mania but less severe,” according
to MedicineNet.com, a physician-produced online health-care publishing
company.

“The symptoms are similar, with elevated mood, increased activity,
decreased need for sleep, grandiosity, racing thoughts and the like,”
the company reports at its medical dictionary
website,http://www.medterms.com.

“It is important to diagnose hypomania, because, as an expression of
bipolar disorder, it can cycle into depression and carry an increased
risk of suicide,” the site reports.

Bipolar disorder is marked by periods of elevated or irritable mood —
the mania — alternating with depression, according to the National
Institutes of Health.

The mood swings between mania and depression can be very abrupt, it reports.

“Whether it’s hypomania or mania is a matter of severity,” said local
psychiatrist Dr. Robert Blanche, who is Downing’s physician.

“In general, it’s an elevated or an irritable mood that’s not normal
for the person,” Blanche said.

“In his (Downing’s) case, he was irritable and also, maybe the word is
‘expansive’ in his affects, (showing) euphoria, elation and
excitement,” Blanche said.

“He had never had a history of this before,” Blanche said.

Downing theorizes that his stopping his antidepressant too quickly, on
his own, led to the episode.

Blanche, though, describes the episode as a case of
antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Blanche said the only way to arrest the condition of hypomania is for
the person to go into the hospital so that their medications can be
adjusted.

During his own hospitalization, Downing was prescribed a mood
stabilizer, Depakote, classified as an anti-seizure medicine and the
medicine most commonly prescribed for mania by psychiatrists, Blanche
said.

The medicine acts to bind up what can be described as “excitatory”
chemicals in the brain, Blanche said.

Ultimately, though, that can result in a depletion of those chemicals
and a person can slide into a depression, Blanche said.

“If (a patient) is on a mood stabilizer, you can introduce an
antidepressant,” he said.

Downing said that his current antidepressant, Wellbutrin, is working
well for him.

After living through a hypomanic episode, some patients choose to stay
on the medicine, Blanche said.

“Some people will actually choose to stay on the medicine, just
because they don’t want it to ever happen again,” he said.

Fortunately, the condition “is one of the most treatable conditions in
psychiatry,” added Blanche, who serves as the psychiatrist at the East
Baton Rouge Parish jail and is the medical director of an emergency
psychiatric treatment center affiliated with the Earl K. Long Medical
Center.

Downing’s experiences this summer seem to have had all the markings of
manic episodes of bipolar disorder.

“Around the first of June 2010, I started feeling really good, started
talking a lot more, making big plans,” Downing said.

Around that time, he went to speak at a law conference in Carmel, Calif.

“I went to Yosemite, it was beautiful. I would wake up at 3 o’clock, 4
o’clock, 5 o’clock (thinking) ‘You need to retire, buy some foreclosed
properties, fix them up and make money to help people in India dig
wells,” Downing said.

“I was making grandiose plans,” he said.

Usually frugal, he started spending money, too, he said.

Before the episode was over, he had run up debts of almost $100,000,
buying such things as a 1971 Rolls Royce, three Harley-Davidson
motorcycles and a 1952 police car, he said.

He also bought a $1,000 commercial pressure washer, a large lawn
tractor and expensive new tools to help put a formerly homeless man
into business, he said.

“He just wasn’t himself,” said his wife, Pam Downing.

The couple will have been married 30 years on March 29.

“When the person is in that condition, you really can’t reason with
them,” Blanche said.

“The amazing thing about it is that it robs the person of their
insight,” he said.

In contrast, people are “painfully aware” of the other aspect of
bipolar disorder — depression, Blanche said.

Physicians and employers may miss a condition like hypomania, said
Townsend, because, like most people, “we like happy people, perky
people.”

“There’s a little more-rapid thinking, (rapid) speech, a decreased
need for sleep” in someone with mania, he said.

“When it becomes a condition is when it affects functioning,” Townsend said.

“It’s wonderful that the judge is willing to be an advocate for
bipolar disorder” awareness, Townsend said, referring to Downing.

“It’s very common, and people with it can be very productive members
of our society. It’s all around us,” he said.

Downing’s symptoms brought along misunderstandings among friends and
family members and conflicting ideas on the cause and solution of the
situation, he and family members said
Downing said he refused to seek treatment.

Finally, at one point, his eldest daughter, Kathryne Hart, 27, after
consulting with a physician, sought to have her father committed to a
hospital. Hart’s efforts came after Downing threatened suicide if
there was any more talk about his going to see a doctor.

“She was very brave,” Downing said.

But Downing wasn’t at home as expected when sheriff’s deputies arrived
to bring him to the hospital.

Pam Downing, who supported Hart in the decision, had taken the
couple’s son, Wes Downing, then 24, to visit a relative in Missouri
and to get away from the stressful situation at that time. The
Downings also have another daughter,  Kiera Downing, 26.

Shortly afterward, a group of Downing’s friends brought Downing to see
Blanche, who then admitted Downing into a psychiatric hospital, and
Downing began the recovery process, Kathryne Hart said.

Hart said that the threat of her father taking his life was something
she couldn’t ignore.

When she was in middle school, she said, two fellow students killed
themselves within a week of each other.

“I couldn’t take that chance,” she said. “I was going to do anything
to save him.”

The family said it took about a month after his hospitalization for
Downing to begin seeming like himself again and to understand what had
happened.

Downing said he has struggled with guilt over the debt he accrued
during the manic episode.

He’s taken heart, he said, from something he read in the book “Words
to Lift Your Spirit” by Dale Brown:

“When we do experience failure in our jobs or in our personal lives,
we must not shackle ourselves with guilt, because it can lead to the
silent suffocation of our spirit.”

Downing said that his speaking about his experience is a way to bring
something positive from it.

“He’s 100 percent better,” Hart said. “He’s completely back to normal.
He’s reconciled with all of us.”

“Something like this either tears a family apart or makes it
stronger,” Pam Downing said.

For them, the experience has made the family stronger, she said,
adding that they received a lot of support from the pastors of their
church, First Presbyterian.

Downing, who receives a pension for his years of public service,
served as a district judge for 15 years and as a 1st Circuit Court of
Appeal judge for 10 years.

Over the years, he also worked in various volunteer programs for
prison inmates, such as a Bible study and a program that prepared
inmates for getting jobs when they were released.

He also previously served on the boards of Cenikor, a treatment
community to help people end substance abuse, and the Baton Rouge
Marine Institute, now AMIkids Baton Rouge.

Looking back on the events of last summer, he said, “Twenty-five years
in public service and, then, at the end of my career, people are
going, ‘What’s happening? Something’s wrong.’”

Looking ahead to the future, Downing said, “I’ve been a positive
person most of my life. I can see light at the end of the tunnel.”

Bipolar disorder, classified as a mood disorder, affects about 5.7
million Americans or approximately 2.6 percent of the U.S. population.

The disorder, which affects men and women equally, involves periods of
mania — elevated or irritable mood — alternating with periods of
depression. There are two types. Bipolar disorder type I involves
periods of major depression and was formerly called manic depression.
Bipolar disorder type II involves hypomania, with symptoms that aren’t
as extreme as the symptoms of mania.

In most people with bipolar disorder, there is no clear cause.

The following, though, may trigger a manic episode in people
vulnerable to the illness:

Life changes such as childbirth.
Medication such as antidepressants and steroids.
Periods of sleeplessness.
Recreational drug use.

Symptoms of the manic phase can last from days to months and include:

Agitation or irritation.
Inflated self-esteem.
Noticeably elevated mood.
Poor temper control.
Impaired judgment.
Spending sprees.

Medicines called mood stabilizers are the first line of treatment.
Antidepressant medications can be added to mood-stabilizing drugs.
Other medications used to treat bipolar disorder are anti-psychotic
drugs and anti-anxiety drugs.

Source: The National Institutes of Health

Capitol news bureau writer Michelle Millhollon contributed to this story.

1,376 total views, no views today

LEXAPRO: Judge Experiences Antidepressant-Induced Hypomania

A doctor who is telling the truth about the hypomanic episode this
judge experienced from his antidepressant?!!!!! How refreshing that
the patient is getting the truth rather than being told he had an
“underlying” Bipolar Disorder that was manifest by his antidepressant
use!!!!! Why can’t other doctors be as honest and come right out and
tell the patient that their Bipolar symptoms have been brought on by
their antidepressant?

BUT when a patient experiences mania or hypomania from an
antidepressant, it is ABSOLUTELY INSANE to think they will not
experience it again on a different antidepressant! He and his family
had better hold their breaths!

What a shame when this happened that he did not have a copy of my DVD,
“Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?” If he had, the
DVD would have served as a warning for him about this common reaction
to both antidepressant use and abrupt withdrawal from antidepressants.

Why are these “Bipolar” patients not told they are suffering
continuous mild seizure activity which is what Bipolar Disorder is – a
sleep/seizure disorder brought on by the drugs?! ANTI-depressants are
stimulants, stimulants over stimulate the brain producing seizures.
The one time of day we all are in seizure activity is during REM sleep
– the dream state. So antidepressants are basically chemically
inducing the dream state during wakefulness.

By the way, the names “Mania” and “Hypomania” should be changed to
“Shear Hell on Earth!!!!!!!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of
Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I
Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder. . .

Blanche [Downing’s physician], though, describes the episode as a case
of antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Find this article at:

http://www.2theadvocate.com/features/people/Handling-hypomania.html?showAll=y&c=y

Former Judge Bob Downing explains episode that led to his resignation

By ELLYN COUVILLION
Advocate staff writer
Published: Mar 13, 2011 – Page: 1D

Comments (3)

Bob Downing, former 1st Circuit Court of Appeal judge, whose sudden
resignation from the bench last summer was surrounded by confusion,
can sort  out the events on a kind of timeline.

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder.

During the episode that lasted approximately three months, Downing
spent money wildly, alienated family, friends and employees and
resigned from the judicial bench, about the time he was hospitalized
and treated.

“It was a short period. It seemed like an eternity,” Downing, 61, said
recently from an office at the law firm of Dué, Price, Guidry,
Piedrahita and Andrews, where he’s working in an “of counsel” status.

In that capacity, Downing said that attorneys with the firm will work
with him on cases he brings in, but he is not on salary at the firm.
Downing handles personal injury cases.

Now being treated with medication for what was likely a one-time event
and back to feeling like himself, Downing said he recently decided to
speak out about his experience for several reasons.

“For people who have open heart surgery or stents, watch out for
depression,” Downing said.

One in five people experience an episode of depression after having
heart surgery, according to the website,http://www.psychcentral.com,
an independent mental health and psychology network run by mental
health professionals.

Downing also advises people taking antidepressants to stay in touch
with their doctor.

And, he said, “If you start feeling really wonderful and start
spending a lot of money, you need to see a counselor,” Downing said.

Hypomania is “a condition similar to mania but less severe,” according
to MedicineNet.com, a physician-produced online health-care publishing
company.

“The symptoms are similar, with elevated mood, increased activity,
decreased need for sleep, grandiosity, racing thoughts and the like,”
the company reports at its medical dictionary
website,http://www.medterms.com.

“It is important to diagnose hypomania, because, as an expression of
bipolar disorder, it can cycle into depression and carry an increased
risk of suicide,” the site reports.

Bipolar disorder is marked by periods of elevated or irritable mood —
the mania — alternating with depression, according to the National
Institutes of Health.

The mood swings between mania and depression can be very abrupt, it reports.

“Whether it’s hypomania or mania is a matter of severity,” said local
psychiatrist Dr. Robert Blanche, who is Downing’s physician.

“In general, it’s an elevated or an irritable mood that’s not normal
for the person,” Blanche said.

“In his (Downing’s) case, he was irritable and also, maybe the word is
‘expansive’ in his affects, (showing) euphoria, elation and
excitement,” Blanche said.

“He had never had a history of this before,” Blanche said.

Downing theorizes that his stopping his antidepressant too quickly, on
his own, led to the episode.

Blanche, though, describes the episode as a case of
antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Blanche said the only way to arrest the condition of hypomania is for
the person to go into the hospital so that their medications can be
adjusted.

During his own hospitalization, Downing was prescribed a mood
stabilizer, Depakote, classified as an anti-seizure medicine and the
medicine most commonly prescribed for mania by psychiatrists, Blanche
said.

The medicine acts to bind up what can be described as “excitatory”
chemicals in the brain, Blanche said.

Ultimately, though, that can result in a depletion of those chemicals
and a person can slide into a depression, Blanche said.

“If (a patient) is on a mood stabilizer, you can introduce an
antidepressant,” he said.

Downing said that his current antidepressant, Wellbutrin, is working
well for him.

After living through a hypomanic episode, some patients choose to stay
on the medicine, Blanche said.

“Some people will actually choose to stay on the medicine, just
because they don’t want it to ever happen again,” he said.

Fortunately, the condition “is one of the most treatable conditions in
psychiatry,” added Blanche, who serves as the psychiatrist at the East
Baton Rouge Parish jail and is the medical director of an emergency
psychiatric treatment center affiliated with the Earl K. Long Medical
Center.

Downing’s experiences this summer seem to have had all the markings of
manic episodes of bipolar disorder.

“Around the first of June 2010, I started feeling really good, started
talking a lot more, making big plans,” Downing said.

Around that time, he went to speak at a law conference in Carmel, Calif.

“I went to Yosemite, it was beautiful. I would wake up at 3 o’clock, 4
o’clock, 5 o’clock (thinking) ‘You need to retire, buy some foreclosed
properties, fix them up and make money to help people in India dig
wells,” Downing said.

“I was making grandiose plans,” he said.

Usually frugal, he started spending money, too, he said.

Before the episode was over, he had run up debts of almost $100,000,
buying such things as a 1971 Rolls Royce, three Harley-Davidson
motorcycles and a 1952 police car, he said.

He also bought a $1,000 commercial pressure washer, a large lawn
tractor and expensive new tools to help put a formerly homeless man
into business, he said.

“He just wasn’t himself,” said his wife, Pam Downing.

The couple will have been married 30 years on March 29.

“When the person is in that condition, you really can’t reason with
them,” Blanche said.

“The amazing thing about it is that it robs the person of their
insight,” he said.

In contrast, people are “painfully aware” of the other aspect of
bipolar disorder — depression, Blanche said.

Physicians and employers may miss a condition like hypomania, said
Townsend, because, like most people, “we like happy people, perky
people.”

“There’s a little more-rapid thinking, (rapid) speech, a decreased
need for sleep” in someone with mania, he said.

“When it becomes a condition is when it affects functioning,” Townsend said.

“It’s wonderful that the judge is willing to be an advocate for
bipolar disorder” awareness, Townsend said, referring to Downing.

“It’s very common, and people with it can be very productive members
of our society. It’s all around us,” he said.

Downing’s symptoms brought along misunderstandings among friends and
family members and conflicting ideas on the cause and solution of the
situation, he and family members said
Downing said he refused to seek treatment.

Finally, at one point, his eldest daughter, Kathryne Hart, 27, after
consulting with a physician, sought to have her father committed to a
hospital. Hart’s efforts came after Downing threatened suicide if
there was any more talk about his going to see a doctor.

“She was very brave,” Downing said.

But Downing wasn’t at home as expected when sheriff’s deputies arrived
to bring him to the hospital.

Pam Downing, who supported Hart in the decision, had taken the
couple’s son, Wes Downing, then 24, to visit a relative in Missouri
and to get away from the stressful situation at that time. The
Downings also have another daughter,  Kiera Downing, 26.

Shortly afterward, a group of Downing’s friends brought Downing to see
Blanche, who then admitted Downing into a psychiatric hospital, and
Downing began the recovery process, Kathryne Hart said.

Hart said that the threat of her father taking his life was something
she couldn’t ignore.

When she was in middle school, she said, two fellow students killed
themselves within a week of each other.

“I couldn’t take that chance,” she said. “I was going to do anything
to save him.”

The family said it took about a month after his hospitalization for
Downing to begin seeming like himself again and to understand what had
happened.

Downing said he has struggled with guilt over the debt he accrued
during the manic episode.

He’s taken heart, he said, from something he read in the book “Words
to Lift Your Spirit” by Dale Brown:

“When we do experience failure in our jobs or in our personal lives,
we must not shackle ourselves with guilt, because it can lead to the
silent suffocation of our spirit.”

Downing said that his speaking about his experience is a way to bring
something positive from it.

“He’s 100 percent better,” Hart said. “He’s completely back to normal.
He’s reconciled with all of us.”

“Something like this either tears a family apart or makes it
stronger,” Pam Downing said.

For them, the experience has made the family stronger, she said,
adding that they received a lot of support from the pastors of their
church, First Presbyterian.

Downing, who receives a pension for his years of public service,
served as a district judge for 15 years and as a 1st Circuit Court of
Appeal judge for 10 years.

Over the years, he also worked in various volunteer programs for
prison inmates, such as a Bible study and a program that prepared
inmates for getting jobs when they were released.

He also previously served on the boards of Cenikor, a treatment
community to help people end substance abuse, and the Baton Rouge
Marine Institute, now AMIkids Baton Rouge.

Looking back on the events of last summer, he said, “Twenty-five years
in public service and, then, at the end of my career, people are
going, ‘What’s happening? Something’s wrong.’”

Looking ahead to the future, Downing said, “I’ve been a positive
person most of my life. I can see light at the end of the tunnel.”

Bipolar disorder, classified as a mood disorder, affects about 5.7
million Americans or approximately 2.6 percent of the U.S. population.

The disorder, which affects men and women equally, involves periods of
mania — elevated or irritable mood — alternating with periods of
depression. There are two types. Bipolar disorder type I involves
periods of major depression and was formerly called manic depression.
Bipolar disorder type II involves hypomania, with symptoms that aren’t
as extreme as the symptoms of mania.

In most people with bipolar disorder, there is no clear cause.

The following, though, may trigger a manic episode in people
vulnerable to the illness:

Life changes such as childbirth.
Medication such as antidepressants and steroids.
Periods of sleeplessness.
Recreational drug use.

Symptoms of the manic phase can last from days to months and include:

Agitation or irritation.
Inflated self-esteem.
Noticeably elevated mood.
Poor temper control.
Impaired judgment.
Spending sprees.

Medicines called mood stabilizers are the first line of treatment.
Antidepressant medications can be added to mood-stabilizing drugs.
Other medications used to treat bipolar disorder are anti-psychotic
drugs and anti-anxiety drugs.

Source: The National Institutes of Health

Capitol news bureau writer Michelle Millhollon contributed to this story.

3,048 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother’s Baby Missing: Arizona

Paragraphs four through six read:  “”She should have
sought professional help. She did seek help for post partum
depression and she was on medication and during that
time she seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she
hopped in Bob Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old
mother, who allegedly told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

SSRI Stories note:  Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from any of these
medications can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over a period of
a year or more, under the supervision of a qualified and experienced specialist,
if available.
Withdrawal is sometimes more severe than the original
symptoms or problems.

http://www.kpho.com/news/22168065/detail.html

Johnson’s Grandfather Thinks She’s Lying

Bob Johnson Still Believes Baby Gabriel Is Alive

Pat McReynolds
Reporter,
KPHO.com

POSTED: 10:26 pm MST January 6, 2010
UPDATED: 6:43 am MST
January 7, 2010

TEMPE, Ariz. — Bob Johnson said his
granddaughter, Elizabeth, has always been secretive.

“If she didn’t want
you to know something, you ain’t gonna find out,” Johnson said.

He said
moving in and out of five foster homes as a child made her that way. But he said
the straight “A” student also developed an irrational temper that led to bouts
of rage.

“She should have sought professional help. She did seek help
for post partum depression and she was on medication and during that time she
seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she hopped in Bob
Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was
last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old mother, who allegedly
told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

Elizabeth Johnson was arrested last week in Florida on suspicion of
custodial interference after she didn’t show up for a custodial hearing.

“She had this cockamamie idea that she was going to change her Social
Security number and name and his Social Security number and name and run
forever,” Bob Johnson said.

Instead, in an exclusive interview with CBS
5, Elizabeth Johnson said she simply gave Gabriel to a couple she met in a park.

“I trusted them. I believe in my heart they’re good people,” said
Elizabeth Johnson on the phone from jail.

But her grandfather doesn’t
buy it. He tried to envision her scenario.

‘Oh by the way, how would you
like to have a baby, oh it’s free, yeah it’s free,’ Bob Johnson said. “That’s
hard. That’s hard to really believe, but it’s a simple story. It’s a story that
you can repeat without stumbling.”

The last time Bob Johnson saw Gabriel
was when the whole family got together for Thanksgiving. He has pictures of
Elizabeth Johnson posing with the boy’s father, Logan McQueary.

“She’s
the sweet Elizabeth,” Bob Johnson said when pointing to a picture of her
smiling.

He thinks she gave Gabriel to a family in Texas, and is lying
now so the boy will never be found. But she has threatened to harm the child,
and Bob Johnson wonders if her past and her struggles with self control
eventually got the best of her.

“It’s possible that in a moment of
anger, depression, whatever, that she carried out her threat. I don’t even want
to think about it because, what a waste. What a waste,” said Bob Johnson.

Copyright 2010 by KPHO.com. All rights
reserved.

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SSRIs: Withdrawal is Sometimes More Severe Than the Original Problem.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Although this article at least acknowledges the problem with
rebound where the initial problem seems like nothing compared to the withdrawal

effects and rebound effects, it does not address the seriousness of withdrawal.
What is described here sounds like a piece of cake compared to what so many go
through in antidepressant withdrawal!

The FDA warns that abrupt withdrawal can possibly lead to
suicide, hostility or psychosis – generally a manic psychosis. Those are hardly

the milder withdrawal effects mentioned below! ALWAYS withdraw very, very
gradually so that you only have to deal with these milder withdrawal
effects.

________________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “It seems hard to imagine that

stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat.
Sometimes the reaction is actually
more severe than the original problem.

Paragraph nine
reads:  “Another class of medications that can trigger withdrawal

includes antidepressants such as Celexa, Effexor, Paxil and
Pristiq.
Many people who quit these drugs experience  ‘brain
zaps,’  dizziness or the sensation of having their  ‘head in a
blender,’ along with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.”

http://www.sgvtribune.com/living/ci_13913666

Rebound symptoms may keep many on drugs

Posted: 12/02/2009 10:46:51 PM PST

When people take
certain drugs for anxiety, insomnia, heartburn or headache, they are trying to
ease their discomfort. They surely don’t intend to make things worse, yet
sometimes that is what happens when they go off the medication.

It seems
hard to imagine that stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat. Sometimes the reaction is actually more severe than the

original problem.

Doctors occasionally have difficulty recognizing this
rebound effect, because they may assume that the patients’ difficulties are
simply the return of the original symptoms.

During the 1970s, Valium and
Librium were two of the most commonly prescribed drugs in America. These popular
tranquilizers eased anxiety and helped people sleep.

When they were
stopped abruptly, however, some people developed withdrawal symptoms that
included severe anxiety, agitation, poor concentration, nightmares and insomnia.
Many doctors just couldn’t imagine that such symptoms might persist for weeks,
since these drugs are gone from the body within several days. Nowadays, the

withdrawal syndrome from benzodiazepines like Ativan (lorazepam), Valium
(diazepam) and Xanax (alprazolam) is well-recognized.

Other drugs also
may cause unexpected withdrawal problems. Quite a few people have trouble
stopping certain heartburn drugs. Here’s an example from one reader: “I have
been taking Protonix for heartburn for about six months. After learning of

potential ill effects from long-term use, I tried to stop taking it. After
about a week, I had to start taking it again due to severe heartburn – the
rebound effect, I suppose. I asked my provider how I should go about
discontinuing its use, but she did not know.”

Many physicians assumed
that severe heartburn upon discontinuation was the reappearance of the

underlying digestive problem. In the case of medications such as Aciphex,
Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix, however, an innovative study
demonstrated that perfectly healthy people suffer significant heartburn symptoms
they’d never had before when they go off one of these drugs after two months of
taking them (Gastroenterology, July 2009).

In addition to
benzodiazepines and heartburn medicines, other drugs can cause this type of
rebound phenomenon. Decongestant nasal sprays are notorious for causing rebound
congestion if used longer than three or four days. We have heard from people who
got hooked and used them several times a day for years.

Another class of
medications that can trigger withdrawal includes antidepressants such as Celexa,
Effexor, Paxil and Pristiq. Many people who quit these drugs experience “brain
zaps,” dizziness or the sensation of having their “head in a blender,” along
with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.

All these
medications have two things in common: Stopping suddenly triggers a rebound with
symptoms similar to those of the original problem, and providers have very
little information on how to ease their patients’ withdrawal difficulties.

Patients deserve a warning before starting a drug that may be difficult
to stop. Providers should learn how to help patients stop a medication when they
no longer need it.

Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds
a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert. Write to them in
care of their Web site: www.PeoplesPharmacy.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Son Beats Mother: Drives Car into Abutment: CAN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from
antidepressants can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over months
or years depending on length of use, under the supervision of a qualified
and experienced specialist, if available.

Withdrawal is often more severe than the
original symptoms or problems.
Refer to
CD on safe withdrawal for guidelines “Help! I Can‘t Get Off My

Antidepressant!”

Paragraph 11 reads:  “According to an agreed statement,
Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told police that his son never had a good
relationship with his mother, suffers from severe depression and
doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/pleads+guilty+attacking+mother/2295992/story.html

Man, 28, pleads guilty to attacking his mother

Woman told police she feared for her life

By Andrew Seymour,
The Ottawa CitizenDecember 3, 2009

OTTAWA ­ The 28-year-old son of a
former high tech executive has pleaded guilty to assault causing bodily harm,
for grabbing his mother by the neck, smashing her head on the floor, covering
her nose and mouth to prevent her from breathing and throwing her down a flight
of stairs.

Roman Osadca admitted he was angry at his mother Elizabeth
Osadca on Oct. 7, 2008 after learning his ex-girlfriend had married. So he
charged toward his mother and tossed her on the floor, repeatedly punching and
shaking her head from side to side before placing both hands over her nose and
mouth.

When his mother ­ who described seeing stars and began losing
consciousness ­ fought back by kicking and punching him, he threw her down
the basement stairs.

According to an agreed statement of facts, Elizabeth
Osadca lay dazed at the bottom of the stairs for a few minutes before being able
to quietly climb the stairs and then run to a neighbour’s house to call
police.

Roman Osadca, who had already fled the home in a car, eventually
crashed into a light standard near the corner of Carling Avenue and Moodie
Drive. The light pole fell and hit another car.

Osadca ended up in the
same emergency ward at the Queensway-Carleton hospital as his mother, who had
suffered a cut to the back of her head, a bruised and swollen eye as well as a
red, swollen bump and small cigarette burn to her forehead.

Elizabeth
Osadca ­ who court heard Wednesday doesn’t want her son to go to jail ­
told police she was fearful for her life and believed that her son was going to
kill her.

Following his arrest, Osadca admitted attacking his mother,
telling police he “should have stopped after the first punch,” but never
intended to kill her.

The day of the attack, Roman Osadca had learned his
ex-girlfriend had married a man from the Dominican Republic. Osadca’s mother had
discovered the information and told the woman to tell her son about the new
relationship ­ and he blamed her for what happened.

Police went to
Elizabeth Osadca’s house afterward and found a large hole in the kitchen wall as
well as a knife planted in the wall of the stairs leading to the basement.

According to an agreed statement, Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told
police that his son never had a good relationship with his mother, suffers from
severe depression and doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.

Danny
Osadca is the founder of the Osadca Group, a Nepean consulting group. He is also
a former chief executive of Med Eng Systems.

Calling the attack a “once
in a lifetime situation,” Roman Osadca’s lawyer Rod Sellar said his “extremely
remorseful” client ­ who apologized in court for his actions ­ is
receiving treatment for depression. Osadca, who has also pleaded guilty to
dangerous driving, should receive a conditional sentence, Sellar argued. But
assistant Crown attorney Shawn Eagles argued a six-month jail term was more
appropriate given the prolonged nature of the “vicious attack” and the “profound
breach of trust” in a child’s attacking his own mother.

Sentencing is set
for Dec. 7.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa
Citizen

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 42% of suicides in One Indiana County Were on Antidepressants

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Note the title of this article and how they are blaming increased
suicide with the economy. The economy does increase suicide in several ways but
the two most common denominators in the economy doing this is that these drugs
are more often prescribed due to depression being more common with a poor
economy and people already on antidepressants not being able to keep up their
insurance so that they can afford the drugs thus forcing people into abrupt
withdrawal. The FDA has already warned that abrupt withdrawal from an
antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis.
How, how, how can there be such a high rate of suicide
associated with the use of antidepressants and the article STILL complain that
people have a stigma about “getting help” which in their terms means getting
drugged with an antidepressant?! Oh yes, and we are suppose to believe that
counseling is supposed to help that be less fatal.
These drugs have been shown over and over again to increase
the rate of suicide. But as Hitler said, if you tell a lie often enough people
will believe it. Drug companies have that practice perfected. They will tell you
that black is white and day is night all day long.
Although the report shows a high rate of suicide (42%)
associated with antidepressant use, what is NOT addressed is how many had
recently been taking antidepressants and were in withdrawal which can cause
additional suicidal risks.
___________________________________
Second paragraph from the end reads:  “Of the 17
deaths in the first half of 2009, seven people were taking antidepressant
medication
, but only one was seeing a counselor. Chappell and Groves
said studies show doing both works best.”

SSRI Stories note:  So

forty-two percent of the people who committed suicide were taking
an antidepressant.  This is an exceedingly high
number.

http://www.courierpress.com/news/2009/sep/07/economy-related-suicides-up/

Economy-related suicides up

Groves: Overall numbers consistent with 2008

  • By Gavin
    Lesnick

  • Posted September 7, 2009 at 11:40 p.m. , updated September 8, 2009 at 9:35
    a.m.
Source: Vanderburgh County Coroner’s Office

EVANSVILLE ­
Vanderburgh County had the same number of suicides through the first half of

this year as it did in the first six months of 2008, though officials say there
has been a marked increase in self-inflicted deaths tied to the faltering
economy.

Of the 17 suicides reported through June 30, six of them
occurred after the person lost his job.

That compares with only one

job-related suicide in the first half of 2008.

Coroner Annie Groves
called it a big concern, especially given the recent news that Whirlpool will
shut down next year, taking 1,100 jobs with it. “When you lose your job, you
lose your home, you lose hope,” Groves said. “That worries me with this
economy.”

The coroner’s office recently released data on suicides in
advance of Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week, which continues through
Saturday in Evansville. It ends with the LifeSavers Walk, an annual event that
raises awareness and funds for addressing the suicide problem. Registration
starts at 8 a.m. Saturday at the Evansville State Hospital, 3400 Lincoln
Ave.

Local efforts toward combating suicides grew in 2007, when
Vanderburgh County ended the year with a record 40 self-inflicted deaths.

The numbers went down slightly in 2008, when 38 were reported by year’s
end, and are on pace this year to finish down again.

In addition to the
increase in job-related suicides, Groves said there also has been a steady
increase in self-inflicted deaths by people ages 20 to 39. There were 11 such
deaths in the first six months of the year compared with just five during that
span last year, 14 in all of 2008 and 16 in all of 2007.

“That’s an area
I’m very concerned about,” Groves said. “… It used to be 50 to 59 was our
higher ones.”

The 17 deaths recorded through the end of June include only
confirmed suicides.

Groves said there likely are six more suicides among
14 cases officially ruled accidental overdoses, but that a lack of hard evidence
prevents her from ruling those deaths intentional.

But on another front,
the numbers could be construed as artificially high: The 17 self-inflicted
deaths include seven people who committed a suicidal act in another county but
died here after being airlifted to an Evansville hospital.

In any event,
Groves said seeing the numbers come down from the record-setting 2007 figures is
a good sign.

She credits the dip with multiple prevention efforts: the
walk, frequent classes that teach the signs and symptoms of suicide and
brochures and billboards that increase awareness.

“We’re so busy focusing

on how many we’ve lost, we sometimes forget to focus on how many we’ve saved,”
Groves said.

Janie Chappell, chairwoman of the Southwestern Indiana
Suicide Prevention Coalition, said awareness efforts increasingly will focus on
encouraging people suffering from depression to seek medication and
counseling.

Of the 17 deaths in the first half of 2009, seven people were

taking antidepressant medication, but only one was seeing a counselor. Chappell
and Groves said studies show doing both works best.

“But there’s still so
much stigma surrounding mental health, people are reluctant to get help,”
Chappell said.

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PROZAC: Woman Develops Hypomania: Later Diagnosed as Bipolar as They All Are!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): This little piece on antidepressant-induced bipolar disorder ends with the following questions: “What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?”

When you consider that the rate of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by 4000% in a recent 10 year period that the numbers of those answering a resounding YES to those questions is VERY HIGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have publicly stated over and over again and will say it once again, “Antidepressants are the biggest CAUSE of Bipolar Disorder on the planet!”

1. Mania is a continuous series of mild seizures in the brain.

2. Seizures come from over stimulation of the brain.

3. ANTI – depressants, or the opposite of a depressant – a stimulant.

4. The over stimulation of the brain (especially from the shock of abrupt withdrawal from an antidepressant) leads to mania and the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder.

Fourth sentence reads: “. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania.”

http://bipolar.about.com/b/2009/08/31/bipolar-depression-and-antidepressants.htm

Bipolar Depression and Antidepressants

Monday August 31, 2009

My first psychiatric diagnosis was major depression, and my first psychiatric medication was Prozac. It was prescribed by my GP, not by a psychiatrist. I had a one-week follow-up visit, and then I was turned loose. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania. Someone even called me “the poster child for Prozac.” This was in 1994, and I wasn’t diagnosed with bipolar disorder until 1999, after another antidepressant did a similar thing.

What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?

979 total views, 1 views today

Sen. Grassley: Drug Companies “Bamboozled the FDA” on SSRI Antidepressants

Mon Nov 10, 2008

The following information should go out to every reporter and every other
human on the planet. Please. Please. Please help us get this information out to
as many as possible as a warning. [BUT in doing so always remember to warn
of the extreme potential danger of abrupt withdrawal with the FDA warning that
such can cause suicide, hostility or psychosis.

Please give them our 800 order line or website to download or order my CD, “Help! I Can’t Get Off My
Antidepressant!” so that they will have the formula for safe and almost
painless withdrawal and methods of recovery from the damage they have suffered.]
Now if you have read my book most of this will sound all too familiar and
old. But now the cold hard facts are coming out to the public with Iowa’s own
Senator Grassley leading the way because these drugs grabbed his attention
after overseeing many of the hearings on children and antidepressants. THANK
YOU

SENATOR GRASSLEY FOR YOUR EFFORTS!!!
Some of the most important points in the article to file in your memory
banks and repeat as often as possible to as many as possible are as follows:

#1 US HIGHEST USER OF ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ANTIDEPRESSANTS ARE AMERICA’S
MOST WIDELY PRESCRIBED DRUGS:

“Antidepressant prescribing is more rampant in this country than any other.
The US accounted for 66% of the global market in 2005, compared to 23% in
Europe and 11% for the rest of world, according to a December 2006 report by
Research and Markets.
“A June 2007 survey by the Centers for Disease Control of doctor and
hospital visits in 2005 showed that the most commonly prescribed drugs were
antidepressants, with 48% of the prescriptions issued by primary care
physicians. They have remained in the number one position ever since. Last year, 232
million prescriptions were filled for antidepressants worth nearly $12 billion,
according to a March 2008 report by IMS Health. . . .


#2 YET THE MANUFACTURERS KNEW AND HID THE FACT THAT THESE DRUGS INCREASE
THE RISK OF SUICIDE:

“For fifteen years, the SSRI makers fought against adding a warning about an
increased risk of suicidality, knowing all the long that the risk existed.
[We had the data in court cases for years but could not get the press to cover
it.] Now, the companies are making the irresponsible argument (in defense of
lawsuits claiming they failed to warn doctors and the public of the risk)
that the FDA did not require them to add a warning, so they are immune from
liability. . . .

#3 SINCE 1989 THE MANUFACTURER OF PAXIL KNEW THAT THIS DRUG INCREASES SUICIDE ATTEMPTS BY EIGHT TIMES MORE THAN PLACEBO!

“The report shows that Glaxo [makers of Paxil] knew in 1989, long before
Paxil was FDA approved, that people taking the drug were 8 times more likely to
engage in suicidal behavior than people given a placebo, or sugar pill. Now,
it stands to reason that even the most depressed person would decline to take
Paxil if given these facts. Also, parents certainly would decline if they
were told about the risks. . . .

“The FDA approved Paxil on December 29, 1992, with no warning to doctors or
patients of the significant increased risk of suicidal behavior,” he writes.
. . .

#4 SENATOR GRASSLEY FINDS THAT PAXIL MAKER “BAMBOOZLED” THE FDA PUTTING
PATIENT SAFETY AT RISK

“Senator Grassley has also asked the FDA to go back and review the clinical
trial data submitted on Paxil. In a statement on the Senate floor on June 11,
2008, he said: “Essentially, it looks like GlaxoSmithKline bamboozled the
FDA.”
“We cannot live in a nation where drug companies are less than candid, hide
information and attempt to mislead the FDA and the public,” he stated. “These
companies are selling drugs that we put in our bodies, not sneakers.”
“When they manipulate or withhold data to hide or minimize findings about
safety and/or efficacy they put patient safety at risk,” Senator Grassley said.
“And with drugs like Paxil, the risks are too great.”
Now I need to note here that the only reason Paxil is taking so much heat
and the only reason we have all of this inside information on Paxil is because
of the information obtained during the Wyoming murder/suicide case of Donald
Schell. Before that these companies were settling cases so that they did not
have to go to court and disclose all of this information to the attorneys
working in our behalf.
After waiting three long years for one attorney to decide if he would take
the case, it went to Andy Vickery’s office. Andy took the case and Glaxo
allowed it to go all the way into court instead of settling the case. The jury
heard and saw enough to rule that the two pills of Paxil that Donald Schell
took before getting up one morning and shooting his wife, his daughter and his
baby grand daughter before shooting himself was the main cause.
Glaxo did all they could to seal that information back up again, but it was
too late. The cat was out of the bag. And it is long past time to let the cat
out of the bag on all these other antidepressants as well!
#5 THE RESULTS OF SENATOR GRASSLEY’S INVESTIGATION OF THE LARGE PAYMENTS
AND KICKBACKS TO DOCTORS BY DRUG MAKERS

“According to Senator Grassley’s June 4, 2008 statement in the Congressional
record, although conflict-of-interest disclosure forms make it appear that
the Harvard psychiatrists only received a couple hundred thousand from drug
companies over the past 7 years, the true figures show Dr Biederman received
over “$1.6 million,” Dr Spencer “over $1 million” and Dr Wilens “over $1.6
million” in payments from the drug companies.

“Based on reports from just a handful of drug companies,” he states, “we
know that even these millions do not account for all of the money.”
“Senator Grassley also notes that Dr Schatzberg owns stock worth more than
$6 million in one drug company. Ed Silverman reports on Pharmalot that there
are “30 or so physicians at two dozen universities which the Senate Finance
Committee is probing concerning disclosure of grants from drugmakers.” The
names of those 30 doctors, along with the research mills they operate out of,
need to be made public. . . . .


#6 RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS AND ACADEMIA ON THE TAKE FROM DRUG MAKERS AS WELL
ACTING AS “APOLOGISTS FOR COMMERCIAL SCIENTIFIC FRAUD” – SENIOR ACADEMICS
PROSTITUING MEDICINE.

“It is no longer a case where Americans need only be concerned about the
amount of money the academics are pulling in. The pharmaceutical industry also
has a stronghold on most major research institutions in this country. Many
could not exist if the drug companies withdrew all their research funding, a
state of affairs that did not occur by accident.

“In fact, according to Dr Aubrey Blumsohn, who publishes the Scientific
Misconduct Blog, when all is said and done:

“The chief villains remain our academic institutions and medical leadership.
They have colluded with and have acted as apologists for commercial
scientific fraud. They have tolerated the telling of lies by senior academics.
They have encouraged the prostitution of medicine. They have allowed abuse of the
most fundamental safeguards of science. Most importantly, they have set
terrible examples for our students.”

#7 WHO TOOK THE MONEY TO PUSH ANTIDEPRESSANTS TO CHILDREN?

“. . . . While Dr Keller took the lead on pushing Paxil for children and
adolescents, Dr Emslie was the main man on the Prozac trials, and Dr Wagner was
the queen bee on Zoloft studies. The co-authors of papers that appear in the
medical literature encouraging the use of SSRI’s for kids include Drs
Biederman, Schatzberg, Wilens and, of course, Charles Nemeroff.
“Dr Nemeroff was recently forced to resign as chairman of Emory’s psychiatry
department after Senator Grassley’s investigation revealed that he failed to
disclose to his university more than a million dollars in drug industry
income. All total, Nemeroff had earnings of $2.8 million from drug companies
between 2000 and 2007, but failed to report at least $1.2 million. . . . .


#8 YET AMAZINGLY ENOUGH . . . .

“Shrinks on the take are so addicted to industry money that it’s impossible
to embarrass them. Last year, the press ran major stories when this report
came out, highly critical of how much money they were making. This year, the
average amount rose by 25%.

Now for some hard questions. . . .

*** When Glaxo knew in 1989 that Paxil was inducing suicide at a rate EIGHT
TIMES HIGHER than with a placebo and did not warn, is that not at least
negligent homicide?

Or is it not in some way contributing to a premeditated loss of life?

How often do we read in criminal cases where someone has died and someone
else did not assist that person in need but instead allowed the death to happen
and that person has then been prosecuted and given a prison term?

What is the difference here? The only difference I see is that these people
at Glaxo made a lot of money by keeping quiet and allowing these deaths to
continue!!

*** I have been asking this question for a very long time. Why is it okay
for our academic institutions to peddle drugs and use our students as guinea
pigs in studies?

Why is it okay for them to make so much money from drug companies? Much of
their operating expenses come from this drug company blood money.

Why would anyone be surprised, when seeing this close financial situation
with the drug companies and the academic institutions, that so many students
are placed on these same drugs by campus health centers often addicting them to
the drugs for many years to come?

*** How can shrinks be so stupid, or just plain “in your face” with it, as
to take even more money from these companies while they are already in the
process of being investigated for doing so???

Oh, that’s right we already know the answer to that one – they take more of
these mind altering drugs than just about anyone else! The psychiatric nurse
attending my lecture last year estimated that at least 75% of her colleagues
are on these drugs.

And why are they on these drugs? Because the drug reps are telling them all
that they are in a stressful profession and that sooner or later they are
going to be hit by the anxiety or depression that comes with the stress . . .
so they need to start on the drugs now so as to ward off “the pending
inevitable” anxiety or depression.

Of course then we need to ask the question, “How could they have fallen for
that old sales pitch?” That alone makes you wonder about their sanity!

But then you must ask if it is okay for a drug user to then be a drug pusher
even when we are discussing “legal” drugs? Because that is exactly what we
are seeing happen with this situation with antidepressants – doctors on the
drugs pushing them to others – no different than what you see in street drug
use where those hooked on the drugs are the ones pushing them to others. When
you see how similar in action these antidepressants are to LSD or PCP that
whole scenario becomes totally transparent.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
_www.drugawareness.org_ (https://www.drugawareness.org/) &
_www.ssristories.org_ (http://www.ssristories.org/)
Author of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare & the audio, Help! I Can’t
Get Off My Antidepressant!!! ()

_atracyphd1@…_ (mailto:atracyphd1@…)

_http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0811/S00080.htm_
(http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0811/S00080.htm)

Pharmaceutical Industry Hustlers – Part I
Thursday, 6 November 2008, 1:25 pm
Column: Evelyn Pringle
Pharmaceutical Industry Hustlers – Part I
SSRI Antidepressants Pushers

By _Evelyn Pringle_
(http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/print.html?path=HL0811/S00080.htm#a)
After twenty long years, it appears that the epidemic in mental disorders in
America might be coming to an end. It won’t happen because of any great
medical breakthrough but rather because the perpetrators of the greatest
healthcare fraud in history are finally being exposed. The demolition of the
giant “psycho-pharmaceutical complex” appears to be on the horizon.
For far too long, the focus has been on the drugmakers only. In recent
months, the spotlight has shown where it belongs – on the highly-paid
opportunists responsible for fueling the epidemic in prescribing of psychiatric drugs by
doctors in every field of medicine and the research institutions that enabled
the process.
The antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or
SSRI’s, such as Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Celexa and Lexapro are at the center of
the storm. These drugs have been prescribed to more Americans than any other
class of medications over the past two decades. Cymbalta, Effexor and
Wellbutrin are often referred to as SSRI’s, but they are slightly different
chemically. However, the drugs all carry similar side effects and warnings.
The top sales pitch for SSRI’s has been the “chemical-imbalance-in-the-brain”
myth.

“There is no evidence whatsoever that depression is caused by a
biochemical imbalance,” says Dr Peter Breggin, one of the world’s leading
experts on psychiatric drugs and author of the new book, “Medication Madness.”
People take for granted pronouncements such as, “You have a biochemical
imbalance,” and “mental disorders are like diabetes,” he explains in the book.

“In reality,” Dr Breggin writes, “these are not scientific observations –
they are promotional slogans, so adamantly repeated in the media and by
individual psychiatrists that people assume them to be true.”
“The psycho-pharmaceutical complex fosters these falsehoods in order to
promote the widespread use of their products,” he says. “Reluctant patients by
the millions are pushed into taking drugs by doctors who tell them with no
uncertainty that they need medication.”

“If you have got a biochemical imbalance in your brain,” Dr Breggin advises
in the book, “the odds are overwhelming that your doctor put it there with a
psychiatric drug.”

All Eyes on Glaxo
At the moment, all eyes are on Paxil maker, GlaxoSmithKline (formerly
SmithKline Beecham), due to reports that the company is under investigation by
the US Department of Justice, as well as the Senate Finance Committee, with
Iowa’s Senator Charles Grassley, the ranking Republican on the Committee,
leading the charge.

The report that led to the investigation by Senator Grassley was generated in
litigation and was only recently made public after it was unsealed by the
court. It was submitted by Dr Joseph Glenmullen, a Clinical Instructor in
Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of “The Antidepressant
Solution”

and Prozac Backlash: Overcoming the Dangers of Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, and
Other Antidepressants with Safe, Effective Alternatives.” He was retained as
an expert by the Los Angeles-based law firm of Baum, Hedlund, Aristei & Goldman.
The litigation involves several Paxil-induced suicide cases, including a 13-year-old child.

The report shows that Glaxo knew in 1989, long before Paxil was FDA approved,
that people taking the drug were 8 times more likely to engage in suicidal
behavior than people given a placebo, or sugar pill. Now, it stands to reason
that even the most depressed person would decline to take Paxil if given
these facts.

Also, parents certainly would decline if they were told about the
risks. Dr Glenmullen explains that, by submitting what he refers to as “bad” Paxil
numbers to the FDA, Glaxo was able to avoid adding a warning about suicide to
the label when the drug was approved. “GlaxoSmithKline’s ‘bad’ Paxil numbers
carried the day: The FDA approved Paxil on December 29, 1992, with no warning
to doctors or patients of the significant increased risk of suicidal behavior,” he writes.

Instead, Glaxo listed suicide and suicide attempts that took place during the
“run-in” period of the studies as if they happened in the placebo group. The
run-in period, also called the “wash-out” phase, occurs when all patients
are taken off their existing drugs to let the old drugs wash out of their
systems, and all patients are given placebos. The rationale for washing out old
drugs is to prevent them from confusing the results of the study, so that
patients start out in a similar condition, according to the report.
The official trial only begins after the wash-out phase, once the patients
are assigned to receive either the antidepressant or a placebo. The patients
who continue to receive the placebo are referred to as the placebo group.

“Confusing the pre-study placebo wash-out phase with the placebo group in the
actual study is improper,” Dr Glenmullen writes, “especially when the
concern is a potentially lethal side effect.”

The “correct data shows that suicide attempts in patients on Paxil occurred
at a rate eight times higher than the rate in patients on placebo,” he notes.
Senator Grassley has also asked the FDA to go back and review the clinical
trial data submitted on Paxil. In a statement on the Senate floor on June 11,
2008, he said: “Essentially, it looks like GlaxoSmithKline bamboozled the
FDA.”

“We cannot live in a nation where drug companies are less than candid, hide
information and attempt to mislead the FDA and the public,” he stated. “These
companies are selling drugs that we put in our bodies, not sneakers.”
“When they manipulate or withhold data to hide or minimize findings about
safety and/or efficacy they put patient safety at risk,” Senator Grassley said.
“And with drugs like Paxil, the risks are too great.”

A good start as the Glaxo scandal unravels, the public will learn that other
antidepressant makers such as Eli Lilly, Pfizer, Wyeth and Forest Laboratories
are equally guilty. Likewise, there are many more supposedly independent academic
doctors who have been receiving substantial financial benefits from drug
companies than are currently identified in the media as being under investigation.

Exposing Harvard University’s Joseph Biederman, Thomas Spencer, Timothy
Wilens, Stanford’s Alan Schatzberg, Brown University’s Martin Keller, Melissa
DelBello at the University of Cincinnati, and Drs Karen Wagner and John Rush,
who operated out of the University of Texas, might be a good place to start, but
the trail of Big Pharma’s funding academic research for marketing
purposes certainly does not end with a handful of psychiatrists.

According to Senator Grassley’s June 4, 2008 statement in the Congressional
record, although conflict-of-interest disclosure forms make it appear that the
Harvard psychiatrists only received a couple hundred thousand from drug
companies over the past 7 years, the true figures show Dr Biederman received
over “$1.6 million,” Dr Spencer “over $1 million” and Dr Wilens “over $1.6
million” in payments from the drug companies.

“Based on reports from just a handful of drug companies,” he states, “we know
that even these millions do not account for all of the money.”
Senator Grassley also notes that Dr Schatzberg owns stock worth more than $6
million in one drug company. Ed Silverman reports on Pharmalot that there are
“30 or so physicians at two dozen universities which the Senate Finance
Committee is probing concerning disclosure of grants from drugmakers.” The names
of those 30 doctors, along with the research mills they operate out of, need
to be made public.

The new book, “Side Effects: A Prosecutor, a Whistleblower, and a
Best-selling Antidepressant on Trial,” by investigative journalist Alison Bass,
provides the inside scoop on the fraudulent SSRI research conducted at Brown
University by Dr Keller.

The book also supplies background information on the financial ties between
the so-called “opinion leaders” in psychiatry and the other antidepressant
makers. For instance, Ms Bass explains that Drs Schatzberg and Keller worked as
a team a decade ago to promote Bristol-Myers Squibb’s antidepressant Serzone.

In 1998, Dr Schatzberg was paid to moderate an industry-sponsored symposium
that touted the benefits of Serzone, and Dr Keller was one of the paid
speakers at the event. The same year, Dr Keller received $77,400 in consulting
fees from Bristol-Myers, Ms Bass points out.

Dr Keller later published a study in the New England Journal of Medicine also
touting the benefits of Serzone. The drug was removed from the market in
2004 after it was found to cause liver damage but not before a number of
patients died.

Ms Bass reports that Keller did not report any income from Glaxo on his 1998
tax return. But during her research for “Side Effects,” she discovered he had
earned personal income from Glaxo in 1998, as well as subsequent years.
Keller admitted as much during a September 2006 deposition for a lawsuit filed
against Glaxo, she says.

It is no longer a case where Americans need only be concerned about the
amount of money the academics are pulling in. The pharmaceutical industry also
has a stronghold on most major research institutions in this country. Many could
not exist if the drug companies withdrew all their research funding, a state
of affairs that did not occur by accident.

In fact, according to Dr Aubrey Blumsohn, who publishes the Scientific
Misconduct Blog, when all is said and done:

“The chief villains remain our academic institutions and medical leadership.
They have colluded with and have acted as apologists for commercial
scientific fraud. They have tolerated the telling of lies by senior academics.
They have encouraged the prostitution of medicine. They have allowed abuse of the
most fundamental safeguards of science. Most importantly, they have set
terrible examples for our students.”


U
niversities keep corrupt academics on board for good reason. “Side Effects”
reports that, between 1990 and 1998, “Martin Keller brought in nearly $8.7
million in research funding from pharmaceutical companies.”
The clinical trial industry itself provides a perfect slush fund. Spending in
the U.S. was an estimated $25 billion in 2006 and is expected to reach about
$32 billion by 2011.

Most of the money for trials comes from private
industry, and federal funding assumes a second place position, with the
National Institute of Health budgeting $3 billion for clinical trials in 2006, according
to the paper, “State Medical Board Responses To An Inquiry On Physician
Researcher Misconduct,” by Dr Stefan Kruszewski, Dr Richard Paczynski and
Marzana Bialy, in the Journal of Medical Licensure and Discipline 2008: Vol 94 No 1.
Paxil Study 329 “Side Effects” also covers the whole sordid affair on Paxil Study 329, the
most infamous fraudulent pediatric trial of all time. The study “offers a
landmark for the point at which science turned into marketing,” according to Dr
David Healy.

Dr Healy is a Professor of psychiatry and Director of the North Wales School
of Psychological Medicine at the University of Wales, and an outspoken critic
of the psycho-pharmaceutical complex, with 21 books to his name, including
“The Creation of Psychopharmacology.”

He explains that, in 1998, Glaxo’s original assessment of Study 329 had
concluded that it and another study had shown Paxil did not work for children,
but that it would not be “commercially acceptable” to publicize this finding.
“Instead the positive findings from the study would be published; they were in
an article whose authorship line contains some of the best known names in
psychopharmacology (Keller et al., 2001),” Dr Healy writes in the 2007 paper,
“The Engineers of Human Souls & Academia.”

Dr Keller gets most of the credit for the study, which was completed in
the mid-90’s. Keller et al had some difficulty getting it published at first,
but finally found a journal willing to take the bate in 2001, the Journal of
the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. In all, 20 academics
allowed their names to be attached to this ghostwritten infomercial, and not
one has stepped forward to acknowledge wrongdoing or to admit that a mistake
was made.

Long before the paper was published, the authors of study 329 were fanned out
all the way to Canada giving lectures and presentations to prescribing
doctors at medical conferences and seminars to promote the off-label use of
Paxil for kids. More than any other paper, Study 329 led to an epidemic in
pediatric prescribing. “After its publication, the use of antidepressants for
children skyrocketed,” Dr Glenmullen notes.

These handsomely paid key opinion leaders all deserve to have their names
in lights, especially Drs Graham Emslie and Karen Wagner from the University
of Texas.

Between 2000 through 2005, Glaxo paid Dr Wagner $160,404, but the only
payment she reported to the university was $600 in 2005, according to Senator
Grassley. Dr Wagner also failed to disclose earnings of more than $11,000 from
Prozac-maker Eli Lilly in 2002.

On August 18, 2008, the Dallas Morning News reported that a state mental
health plan naming the preferred psychiatric drugs for children has been quietly
put on hold over fears drug companies may have given researchers consulting
contracts, speakers fees or other perks to help get their products on the
list.

The Children’s Medication Algorithm Project, or CMAP, was supposed to
determine which psychiatric drugs were most effective for children and in what
order they should be tried at state-funded mental health centers, the Morning
News explains.

The academics who developed the CMAP include Drs Wagner and Emslie. Records
show Dr Emslie may have made up to $125,000 from drug companies since
2004, according to the report in the Morning News. While Dr Keller took the lead on
pushing Paxil for children and adolescents,Dr Emslie was the main man on the Prozac
trials, and Dr Wagner was the queen bee on Zoloft studies.

The co-authors of papers that appear in the medical
literature encouraging the use of SSRI’s for kids include Drs Biederman,
Schatzberg, Wilens and, of course, Charles Nemeroff.
Dr Nemeroff was recently forced to resign as chairman of Emory’s psychiatry
department after Senator Grassley’s investigation revealed that he failed to
disclose to his university more than a million dollars in drug industry
income. All total, Nemeroff had earnings of $2.8 million from drug companies
between 2000 and 2007, but failed to report at least $1.2 million.

A complete list of academics who should to be investigated can be found among
the authors of the SSRI papers and studies highlighted in the 2006 Third
Edition of, “Essentials of Clinical Psychopharmacology,” described as “a
synopsis and update of the most clinically relevant material from ‘The American
Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology,'” by none other than Drs
Schatzberg and Nemeroff.

Keep Following the Money
On July 10, 2008, Senator Grassley extended his investigation to include
psychiatry’s top industry-funded front group with a letter to Dr James Scully,
Medical Director and Chief Executive Officer of the American Psychiatric
Association, asking for “an accounting of industry funding that pharmaceutical
companies and/or the foundations established by these companies have provided to
the American Psychiatric Association.”

The Senator wants records from January 2003 to the present. According to the
July 12, 2008, New York Times, in 2006, the “industry accounted for about 30
percent of the association’s $62.5 million in financing.”
A factor rarely discussed in this debate is the amount of money doctors who
prescribe SSRI’s make during brief office calls charged at regular rates. This
practice has taken a tremendous toll on public healthcare programs and has
resulted in higher insurance premiums and overall healthcare costs for all
Americans.

In fact, the bilking of public healthcare programs is what led to the current
investigations by the Finance Committee, which has the responsibility of
overseeing spending in Federal programs. When doctors prescribe drugs for
unnecessary uses, public programs not only have to pay for the drugs, they must
also pay the fees of the prescribing doctors and for the medical care for
injuries caused by the drugs. Government spending tied to the prescribing of
psychiatric drugs has gone through the roof in the past decade.

While testifying before the House Committee on Oversight and Government
Reform on February 9, 2007, Lewis Morris, Chief Counsel at the Department of
Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General, discussed kickbacks to
doctors and told the panel:

“Kickbacks potentially increase the costs to Federal programs because they
encourage overutilization and may encourage the prescribing of more expensive
drugs when clinically appropriate and cheaper options (such as generic drugs)
may be equally effective.”

Mr Morris explained that, “kickbacks offered to prescribing physicians by
pharmaceutical manufacturers take a variety of forms, ranging from free samples
for which the physician bills the programs to all-expense-paid trips and sham
consulting agreements.”

Vermont is a rare state in requiring the pharmaceutical industry to disclose
the money paid to doctors. On July 8, 2008, Vermont’s Attorney General
William Sorrell released the state’s annual report on “Pharmaceutical Marketing
Disclosures,” which lists the payments made by drug companies in 2007. Of the
top 100 recipients, once again, psychiatrists received the highest payments.
Eleven psychiatrists received a total of $626,379, or about 20% of the total
value of payments made, according to the report.

Shrinks on the take are so addicted to industry money that it’s impossible to
embarrass them. Last year, the press ran major stories when this report came
out, highly critical of how much money they were making. This year, the
average amount rose by 25%.

The report also analyzes the payments based upon the drugs being marketed. Of
the top 10 drugs for which disclosures were reported, five are used to treat
mental illness and include Lilly’s Cymbalta and Forest Lab’s Lexapro.
Ironically, Cymbalta sales are also up 25%, according to Lilly’s latest SEC
filing.

Overall, estimates indicate that the drug industry spends $19 billion
annually on marketing to physicians in the form of gifts, travel, meals and
other consulting fees, according to a May 22, 2008, press release by Senator
Grassley’s office. In the November 1, 2007, New England Journal of Medicine
paper, “Doctors and Drug Companies Scrutinizing Influential Relationships,” Dr
Eric Campell, associate professor at the Institute of Health Policy at
Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, writes:

“Individual physicians can take some steps to maximize the benefits for
patients and minimize the risks associated with their own industry
relationships. They can start by recognizing that such relationships are designed to
influence prescribing behavior and by carefully considering the potential
effects that their own associations may have on their patients.”

“And they can bear in mind,” he says, “that the costs of industry dinners,
trips, and other incentives are passed along to their patients in the form of
higher drug prices.” Antidepressant prescribing is more rampant in this country than any other.
The US accounted for 66% of the global market in 2005, compared to 23% in
Europe and 11% for the rest of world, according to a December 2006 report by
Research and Markets.

A June 2007 survey by the Centers for Disease Control of doctor and hospital
visits in 2005 showed that the most commonly prescribed drugs were
antidepressants, with 48% of the prescriptions issued by primary care
physicians. They have remained in the number one position ever since. Last year, 232 million
prescriptions were filled for antidepressants worth nearly $12 billion,
according to a March 2008 report by IMS Health.

The top dogs in the pharmaceutical industry are literally laughing all the
way to the bank. For example, in 2007, Pfizer CEO Jeff Kindler’s pay package
was worth $9.5 million, according to the March 14, 2008, Wall Street Journal. A
previous CEO, David Shedlarz, left last year with an “exit package” worth
over $34 million. In 2007, the total value of Wyeth’s then-CEO Robert Essner’s
pay package was $24.1 million, the Journal reports.

In the meantime, state Medicaid programs are going bankrupt as a result of
the mental illness epidemic occurring only in the US. Attorneys General all
over the country are using consumer fraud statutes to sue the drug giants to
recoup the money lost due to the illegal off-label promotion of psychiatric
drugs and the concealment of their side effects.

For instance, Baum Hedlund has been litigating Private Attorney General
consumer fraud class-action lawsuits against Glaxo since 2004, on behalf of
individuals and entities such as insurance companies in California, Florida,
Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio and
Washington.

The cases are based on documents showing Glaxo promoted Paxil for kids, fully
aware that Paxil failed to out-perform a placebo in the clinical trials and
had higher suicidality rates. A national class settlement of individual
claims was reached in April 2007 in which Glaxo agreed to reimburse parents for
all of the money paid for Paxil prescriptions for their children. A national
class settlement on behalf of third party payors (insurance companies) was just
approved in September 2008.

If not for the few law firms willing to stay the course, the truth would
never have been revealed. Baum Hedlund has been pursuing the SSRI makers for
nearly two decades. Most recently, it has taken up the fight for babies born
with birth defects caused by SSRI’s.

Because the industry was so successful at keeping the original SSRI trial
data hidden, the drugs most serious side effects largely became public only
as a result of the bravery and integrity of such medical experts as Dr Healy, Dr
Glenmullen and Dr Breggin, who could not be bought and could not be bullied.

For fifteen years, the SSRI makers fought against adding a warning about an
increased risk of suicidality, knowing all the long that the risk existed.
Now, the companies are making the irresponsible argument (in defense of
lawsuits claiming they failed to warn doctors and the public of the risk) that the
FDA did not require them to add a warning, so they are immune from liability.
Worse yet, the industry-controlled FDA under the Bush Administration is
supporting this audacious preemption defense and siding with the SSRI makers
against private citizens in courts all over the country, telling judges to rule
in favor of the drug companies and throw out the SSRI cases before they even
make it to a jury.

Although not an SSRI case, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in a case
involving federal preemption, in Wyeth v Levine, on November 3, 2008.
*************
Evelyn Pringle
epringle05@…
(Written as part of the Paxil Litigation Round-Up, Sponsored by Baum,
Hedlund, Aristei & Goldman’s Pharmaceutical Litigation Department
_www.baumhedlundlaw.com_ (http://www.baumhedlundlaw.com/) )


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