ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Patients Report 20 Times More Side Effects Than Doctors Report

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

In answer to the question asked in the title of this article,
“Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?,” I should remind you of the comment made by the psychiatric nurse who
attended one of my lectures a couple of years ago. After listening to me discuss
the potential side effects of SSRI antidepressants she stood and said, “Dr.
Tracy we never get to hear what you have shared with us here tonight, but I know
it is true because I am on Lexapro and have suffered nearly every one of the

side effects you mentioned. But you do not know what is going on out here. At
least 75% of the doctors and nurses I work with are on these drugs! The drug
reps are telling them they are in a stressful profession and will surely end up
suffering depression as a result so they need to get started on these drugs now
in order to help prevent that.”

Of course my first response was, “With these drugs affecting
the memory so strongly as to cause “amnesia” as a frequent side effect, if you
cannot even remember who you are, how do you remember what your patients
need?”
She admitted that they do not remember and have to constantly
remind one another and then they attribute it to old age setting
in.
So perhaps by the time these doctors get around to reporting
the patientsside effects they have forgotten what those side effects were that
they were to report. Of course these drugs also produce much more business
for the doctors by producing side effects and bringing patients back in for
follow up treatment so there is also a financial incentive to not report and
give the drugs a bad record. No matter the reason it is clear that the
situation is causing a very serious situation for patients and public safety in
general.
Paragraph three reads:  “The investigators followed 300
patients who were in ongoing outpatient treatment for depression
over six weeks. The authors compared what the patient reported on a
standardized scale of 31 different side effects (Toronto Side

Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating psychiatrist
on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect between
psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects
reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris.
When the investigators concentrated on
those side effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still

reported 2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/charting-the-depths/201004/why-dont-psychiatrists-notice-when-patients-experience-medication-si

Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?

If side effects fall in the forest, do they make a sound?

Published on April 20, 2010

A rich scientific study raises more

questions than it answers.

This point is exempified by new work conducted
at Rhode Island Hospital and published in the Journal of Clinical
Psychiatry
.

The investigators followed 300 patients who were in
ongoing outpatient treatment for depression over six weeks. The authors compared
what the patient reported on a standardized scale of 31 different side effects
(Toronto Side Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating
psychiatrist on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect
between psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects

reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris. When the investigators concentrated on those side
effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still reported
2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.

The authors summarize their provocative findings in mild
language, “The findings of the present study indicate that clinicians do not
record in their progress notes most side effects reported on a side effects

questionnaire by psychiatric
outpatients receiving ongoing pharmacological treatment for depression.”

Obviously
all is not well in the state of Demark. Although the findings concern the
treatment of depression, they raise broader questions about the doctor-patient
relationship.

Why is there such a massive disconnect between what
psychiatrists and patients report, on something so basic as whether prescribed
medications are having untoward effects? Do psychiatrists not ask enough
questions about side effects? Do psychiatrists not dig deep enough into

patients‘ responses? Are psychiatrists hearing what patients say, but not
documenting it in their notes? Or is the problem more on the patient side? Are
patients reluctant to speak candidly to their doctors about side effects (i.e.,
yes, I am having problems with sexual functioning)? Or do patients freeze up and
forget their experiences when asked in the heat of the moment (it is easier to
respond to a standardized list of side effects using pencil and paper)? Or is it
the situation that is to blame for this disconnect? Are patient-doctor
interactions in this day and age simply too rushed to insure efficient or
effective transfer of information?

Whatever the explanation,
psychiatrists appear to believe that patients are having fewer problems with
medications than they truly are. It is hard to see how psychiatrists can act in
the best interest of their patients if they do not know what their patients are
experiencing!!!!

The researchers recommend the use of a self-administered
patient questionnaire in clinical practice to improve the recognition of side

effects for patients in treatment. This study reveals a chasm of
misunderstanding between doctors and patients. This recommendation is a
sensible, but baby, step towards narrowing
it…

1,315 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Star D Study – Only 3% Remission, Not 67%

Last paragraph reads:  “”Although the study‘s reports make no
mention of this outcome, their data show that after a year of continuation
treatment following remission, of the 4,041 patients who entered the program
only 108 (3%) had a sustained remission — all the other patients either dropped
out or relapsed. Yet STAR*D‘s authors and the NIMH have publicized the study as
showing a 67% success rate for

antidepressants.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mad-in-america/201005/update-the-stard-report
May 19, 2010, Psychiatry

Update on the STAR*D Report
The
documented recovery rate in the STAR*D trial–worse than thought?
Published
on May 19, 2010

Two months ago, I wrote a post about a New Yorker
article that reported that 67% of the depressed patients in the STAR*D trial
“recovered.” As I noted in that post, the 67% figure was a highly exaggerated
number. Only 51% of the 3,671 patients who entered the trial ever remitted, even
for a short period. Furthermore, only about 20% of the patients remitted and
then reported to STAR*D investigators, at some point during a 12-month follow-up
period, that they were still doing well.

But this left an obvious
question, one that I hadn’t been able to find an answer to in the published

STAR*D reports. How many of the 3,671 people who entered the trial remitted and
then stayed well and in the trial throughout the entire 12-month follow-up? That
number would provide a documented long-term recovery rate for patients in the
trial.

A few days ago, Allan Leventhal sent me a 2009 article he
coauthored with David Antonuccio, and in it, they successfully identified this
number (finding it in a confusing graphic I hadn’t been able to decipher.) In
their computations, they relied on STAR*D reports that told of 4,041 initial
participants (3,671 was the number of “enrolled” patients counted in the
analysis of drug-remission rates), and then they came to this bottom-line
conclusion about the documented long-term recovery rate:

“Although the

study‘s reports make no mention of this outcome, their data show that after a
year of continuation treatment following remission, of the 4,041 patients who
entered the program only 108 (3%) had a sustained remission — all the other
patients either dropped out or relapsed. Yet STAR*D‘s authors and the NIMH have
publicized the study as showing a 67% success rate for antidepressants.”

1,330 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL & ALCOHOL: Mother Murders her 3 Year Old Daughter: IL

Paragraphs 15 through 19 read: “Throughout the interview Starr said she was in school because Bianca was the only ‘remotely good’ thing in her life.”

“She became hysterical when the detectives told her Bianca died.”

“ ‘I want her back,’ she cried.”

“The tape shows that Starr calmed down within minutes. Eventually she said, ‘Safe to say to say I killed her. Safe to say I’m going to go to jail. Safe to say I’m never going to be sane again’.”

“Starr also told investigators she had skipped a dose of an anti-depressant.”

http://www.wsiltv.com/p/news_details.php?newsID=9900&type=top

Prosecution Rests in Starr Case

MARION

After an emotional week in court, the Herrin woman on trial for killing her three-year-old daughter has decided not to testify, according to court documents.

Prosecutors began presenting their case against Karrae Starr, 20, by playing the tape of the 911 call she made in late September 2008.

They wrapped it up Friday morning by showing the jury a recording of her interview with investigators, which was conducted hours later.

In the video Starr wore a t-shirt with blood stains on it. She acknowledged the blood belonged to her daughter, Bianca.

During the interview, Starr told investigators Jill Blus of the Williamson County Sheriff’s Department and Bruce Graul of the Herrin Police Department she got angry when Bianca went to the playground with her boyfriend without telling her.

In the recording, Starr tells the investigators Bianca threw a fit when she dragged her home.
Once in Bianca’s bedroom, “I held my hand over her mouth” to make her stop screaming, Starr said.

“I was extremely [expletive] pissed off and drunk,” she continued. She told detectives she had five shots of vodka that night.

Starr said Bianca eventually calmed down, so she removed her hand, and asked Bianca if she was okay. Bianca said yes.

According to Starr, as she was leaving the room she heard Bianca get out of bed, so she turned around. When she did, she saw blood and foam coming from Bianca’s nose.

Thursday a forensic pathologist testified that the blood and foam, combined with swollen organs which were discovered during an autopsy, indicate Bianca was smothered.

“All indications are she didn’t stand up out of bed herself,” Blus told Starr.

Starr, who was a nursing student at the time, did CPR on her daughter. Eventually, she told investigators, “I picked her up and held her and told her to come back….I was giving up because she wasn’t responding.”

Starr said her boyfriend was in the other room on the computer as she gave Bianca CPR.

Throughout the interview Starr said she was in school because Bianca was the only “remotely good” thing in her life.

She became hysterical when the detectives told her Bianca died.

“I want her back,” she cried.

The tape shows that Starr calmed down within minutes. Eventually she said, “Safe to say to say I killed her. Safe to say I’m going to go to jail. Safe to say I’m never going to be sane again.”

Starr also told investigators she had skipped a dose of an anti-depressant.

As the recording played for the jury, Starr became visibly upset several times.

The trial continues Monday. It’s expected to wrap up by Tuesday.

U.S. Attorney Danny Kay and State’s Attorney Chuck Garnati are prosecuting the case. Public Defender Larry Broeking represents Starr.

By Dana Jay
djay@wsiltv.com

2,125 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Death: Possible Intentional Overdose: Texas

Paragraphs 11 through 14 read:  “He says when Moreno was
being arrested an officer
allowed him to go back into
his house to get a bottle of antidepressant pills.”

“The
chief says the bottle, which Moreno wasn’t allowed to handle, was filled on
Feb. 4 with 30 pills.”

“On that Sunday,
Feb 14, investigators say there was only one pill
left.”

“That’s why a toxicology report is being
done.”

http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/news/local/100216-deer-park-jail-death

Family Seeks Answers After Son Dies at Deer Park Jail

Updated: Tuesday, 16 Feb 2010, 9:52 AM CST
Published : Tuesday, 16 Feb
2010, 5:52 PM CST

HOUSTON – Roy Moreno is in pain. His 26-year-old son
went to jail Sunday for two traffic warrants, but Nicholas Moreno never walked
out of holding cell D223 in Deer Park.

On Sunday, Moreno was driving home
in Shore Acres. He’d been out with friends.

His father says a block away
from their house he hit this mailbox while trying to avoid neighborhood dogs.
Police were called but left because of shift change.

When the shore acres
officers arrived at Moreno’s house they realized the 26-year-old had traffic
warrants out of Deer Park.

He was eventually taken to the Deer Park
Police Department.

“He was booked in without incident and went to sleep
in the jail cell. They knew he was sleep because he was snoring loudly,” Chief
Gregory Grigg says.

According to the chief it was 12:50 a.m. when a
jailer realized Moreno’s snoring had stopped.

“They opened door and went
in and tried to shake him awake,” Chief Grigg says.

After CPR and a
defibrillator Moreno was gone. Now his father wants to know what happened to his
otherwise healthy son.

Chief Grigg has another concern.

He says
when Moreno was being arrested an officer allowed him to go back into his house
to get a bottle of antidepressant pills.

The chief says the bottle, which
Moreno wasn’t allowed to handle, was filled on Feb. 4 with 30 pills.

On
that Sunday, investigators say there was only one pill left.

That’s why a
toxicology report is being done.

In the meantime, Roy Moreno simply wants
to know what happened to the son he nurtured and raised for 26 years.

“He
loved his family, he loved his friends, I never thought this would happen to
us,” Moreno says.

1,382 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Two Children & Self: Ohio

Paragraph 12 reads:  ” ‘Daniel is in counseling and
on antidepressants,
the detective
wrote.”

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/12/05/murder-suicide_westerville_f.ART_ART_12-05-09_A1_3TFT8G8.html?sid=101

Were their deaths preventable?
As details of the Westerville

murdersuicide emerge, there are questions about what was known of the family,
when and by whom
Saturday,  December 5, 2009 3:10 AM
By
Theodore Decker, John Futty and Rita Price
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

CHRIS RUSSELL | Dispatch

A memorial for Nicole and Sarah
Dobson sits outside the home where they were killed by their father. The girls
met with a child-welfare worker, who asked if their dad had hurt them, three
weeks before they died.

Three weeks before their father killed them,
Nicole and Sarah Dobson met with a child-welfare worker who asked whether he had
hurt them.

“The girls denied that they were abused or maltreated,” said
Eric Fenner, executive director of Franklin County Children

Services.

With no physical evidence or statements supporting the
allegations that had been made in a referral, the caseworker saw no grounds to
remove the children from Daniel J. Dobson’s Westerville home, Fenner said
yesterday.

Police say Dobson, divorced this year from the children‘s
mother, Joyce, shot the girls and then himself Thursday in an upstairs bedroom
of the house at 813 Westray Dr., just west of Sunbury Road.

Now the
agency is left to wonder: Were the girls so scared that they lied? And if so,
did investigators, who had been called about the Dobsons twice before, do
everything they could to find the truth?

“A child who is afraid may not
say everything,” said Fenner, who had tears in his eyes as he talked about the
shooting deaths of Nicole, 15, and Sarah, 11. “What worries me is, ‘Did they
reach out to someone? Did they try?’  ”

In early 2008, both girls
reportedly said that, on a scale of 1 to 10, their fear of their father “was
close to 10,” according to the complaint Children Services supplied to
Westerville police.

The report indicated that Mr. Dobson sometimes hurt
the girls by tickling them and bruised them by squeezing them too hard, usually
while he was intoxicated. Sarah reportedly said she “wished she could hurt her

father so he doesn’t kill us.”

But Fenner said those comments came not
from a caseworker but from the person who referred the case to the agency, whose
identity is protected by law. He said those were the type of claims that the
agency was unable to confirm.

Police closed their investigation of the
2008 case as “unfounded” after the mother told them “this whole thing was blown
out of proportion and has been resolved,” a detective’s report
shows.

“Daniel is in counseling and on antidepressants,” the detective
wrote.

Fenner said the agency will investigate and review all its work in
the case. In addition to the recent allegation, he said caseworkers had received
referrals about the treatment of the children in October 2007 and February
2008.

In each case, no abuse was substantiated, although it was clear
that the mother and father had a volatile relationship, Fenner said. “Dad was
drinking; there was some domestic violence.” Franklin County records, however,
show that Dobson had never been charged criminally.

Fenner said the
most-recent complaint, that Dobson had slapped his older daughter on the leg,
came in to the agency on Nov. 2. The caseworker went to the house several times
before finally finding Mr. Dobson at home on Nov. 13.

The caseworker
notified Westerville police about the case, standard practice when a
physical-abuse allegation is made, officials said.

Lt. John Petrozzi said
a detective left a voice mail for Dobson Monday night. Dobson didn’t return the
call.

Petrozzi said information supplied by Children Services indicated
that a therapist alerted the agency about Nicole’s claim that her father slapped
her on the leg “because she wasn’t getting ready for school fast
enough.”

Handwritten notes that Dobson left before killing himself make
no mention of child-abuse allegations. He wrote various notes to his family, his
ex-wife, even his doctor, all on the same notepad. He thanked his family for
their love and support through the years and said there was nothing more they
could have done.

The letters expressed no anger toward his ex-wife, or
anyone else, and said that he had entertained suicidal thoughts for decades and
wanted to spare his daughters pain.

“There will be no more worries for
us,” he wrote.

“I could not stand to see Nicole and Sarah suffering and
could not leave them behind.”

He also left a note at the bottom of the
stairs.

“Joyce, do not come upstairs. Call the police.”

The
Dispatch
reviewed the notes at the Franklin County coroner’s office through
a public-records request.

According to a 911 call from the younger girl’s
principal, which led to the discovery of the bodies, school administrators were
aware of domestic problems.

Kathleen Norris, the principal of St. Paul
Elementary School in Westerville, called 911 Thursday after Sarah failed to show
up for school and her father didn’t report her absence.

In her call,
Norris was asked by a 911 operator whether Daniel Dobson might harm
Sarah.

“Mother feels that, yes, but I have, I have no proof,” Norris
said. “She was worried.”

She described the parents’ relationship as
“adversarial.”

After 10 years of marriage, Mr. Dobson filed for the
divorce in August 2008 and it was granted in May. He kept the house and agreed
to a shared-parenting plan with his ex-wife. Nicole was to live primarily with
her father, and Sarah would move between their homes on a week-to-week basis,
court records show.

Although the girls were not in school on Wednesday,
Petrozzi said detectives think they weren’t killed until sometime Thursday
morning, possibly before dawn.

What the three did during the day on
Wednesday is unclear, though he said he thought the girl’s mother spoke to one
or both girls Wednesday morning, and a neighbor reported seeing Mr. Dobson in
his garage about 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Franklin County Coroner Jan Gorniak
could not pinpoint a time of death but said the girls and their father likely
died Wednesday night or Thursday morning. She said all died of single shotgun
wounds to the head.

Fenner said cases involving domestic violence can be
difficult for child-welfare agencies, partly because fear and threats are more
difficult to substantiate — and to read on children‘s faces — than physical
abuse and neglect.

He said the agency is developing a special unit that
will have more training.

“This is an area we want to strengthen,” he
said. “We want to find out how we can, within the confines of the law, delve
deeper.”

tdecker@dispatch.com

jfutty@dispatch.com

rprice@dispatch.com

1,494 total views, no views today

CELEXA: Police Officer Who Shot Man Was On Celexa:

Paragraph six reads: “Holt, who investigators determined

fired the fatal shot, was ultimately released from duty. Gabriel

continues to work for the Breckenridge police department.”

Paragraph 79

reads:  “Toxicology reports taken on the three officers showed that

Holt also had 1450 NG/ML of Celexa in his urine. There were no

drugs or other substances detected in results for Gabriel or

McMullen.”

http://www.reporternews.com/news/2009/nov/28/shooting-death-not-forgotten/

Breckenridge shooting death not forgotten

It has been one year

since Michael Richardson was shot to death by Breckenridge police, but the

grieving continues for family and friends.

Shai Berry, a family friend,

organized Justice for Mike to raise funds to help Richardson’s family. Her

response is typical of those with questions that have lingered since his

death.

“Mike didn’t have to die that night,” Berry said. “Not only his

death, but the way he died left a hole in the hearts of so many that only

justice can begin to heal.”

Richardson, 37, of Albany, died from a single

gunshot wound during a confrontation with police at 12:36 a.m. Nov. 29, 2008,

initial reports said.

Breckenridge police officers Scott Gabriel and

Jason Holt were on paid leave until the grand jury in May determined there was

not enough evidence to prosecute them for the shooting.

Holt, who

investigators determined fired the fatal shot, was ultimately released from

duty. Gabriel continues to work for the Breckenridge police

department.

Many questions have surrounded the case in the weeks and

months after the shooting death.

The Reporter-News filed a public

information request with the Department of Public Safety and received copies of

the reports from officers and witnesses involved, as well as copies of in-dash

videos recorded at the scene.

However, a request to the city of

Breckenridge for the personnel files of the two officers was challenged by

attorneys for the city, even after the Attorney General of Texas ruled that the

city should release the files.

To date, the city has not turned over the

officers’ personnel files.

Mark Haney, a Fort Worth attorney who

represents Richardson’s family, also has been denied access to the officers’

personnel records.

Haney said last week he plans to file a federal

lawsuit alleging civil rights violations.

“We intend to file suit because

we believe that the death of Michael Richardson should never had occurred but

for the actions of the police department, and we intend to hold them accountable

for that loss,” Haney said. “The citizens of Breckenridge need to have some

light shined on that police department.”

Andy Messer, the attorney hired

by the city of Breckenridge, said he will “vigorously defend” the city and the

officials should a lawsuit be filed.

“We expected a lawsuit the minute we

received notice of their representation of counsel,” Messer said.

Messer

has filed motions blocking the release of the personnel records.

“We

think the Texas Rangers investigation shows the important facts of the case,”

Messer said. “We think the officers were justified in their actions.”

A

day before

The day before the shooting, Richardson spent Thanksgiving

with his mother Connie Jackson and his sister and her three children.

“We

did all of the cooking and everyone kind of helped,” Connie Jackson remembered.

“We watched football and stayed close to home.”

Then everybody napped for

a while, got up a little later and ate some more.

“I remember Michael got

him a great big piece of pecan pie and got on the bed and watched football,” his

mother recalled.

He slept at her house that night. They all got up early

that morning to go shop.

First they stopped to get cell phones for

Richardson’s two sons, Bryant and Bryson, both teenagers. Then the family went

to Walmart.

“We were calling each other on cell phones in the store and

finally as I was checking out I saw him by the Christmas trees and waved,”

Connie said.

That would be the last time she saw her son

alive.

After shopping, Richardson and some friends were out shooting

feral hogs. He left with a cooler loaded down with Gatorade and set out with a

rifle he kept in his truck.

“He usually never drank when he was hunting,”

said his uncle, James Jackson.

The hunting trip with a friend was the

reason her son had a gun in his truck, his mother, said Connie

Jackson.

Afterward, he went back to Albany where he lived, dropped off

the gifts for his two sons, Bryant and Bryson, cleaned up and headed back to

Breckenridge.

Hours before death

When he returned to Breckenridge

later that evening, Richardson reportedly headed over to Potter’s Bar and Grill.

In a report taken by investigators from the Texas Rangers, owner and bartender

Amy Potter said that Richardson usually came into the bar once or twice a

week.

On Friday, Nov. 28, the bar was busy, with about 140 customers

inside. Potter told investigators she had never met Richardson but knew who he

was. Several of her bartenders knew him.

She said he usually drank Vodka

and 7-Up but “sometimes he drinks fake drinks to give the impression he is

drinking.”

That night, Richardson paid for two rounds of shots for

friends and paid for five mixed drinks. He paid his tab of $230 at 12:15 a.m.

Potter said he was buying drinks for friends and handing them out just before

last call.

“Everyone said Michael was sober when he left the bar,” Potter

said in the statement. He took local bail bondsman Buddy Moser home that

night.

In his statement to investigators, Moser said when Richardson

asked him if he needed a ride home, he said he did. When the two left the bar,

he told investigators he thought “Michael was acting fine and was all right to

drive.”

“I went into my house and heard what sounded like seven

gunshots,” Moser’s affidavit says. “I never thought it was involving Michael.”

Moser said he called his son after hearing that Richardson had been

shot.

“At no time did I ever see a gun in Michael’s truck,” Moser

said.

As he drove away from Moser’s home, Richardson reportedly ran over

a trash can and was dragging it under his truck, he made his way down the street

and eventually landed with his truck hung up on a chain-link fence at the

intersection of West 1st Street and North Court Avenue. In his statement to

investigators, homeowner William Lord said he believed Richardson was about to

drive his truck through the home there.

Lord went to the driver’s side

window and asked Richardson what he was doing but noted he had a blank look on

his face.

The initial call to 911 was made by a woman who reported her

mailbox down.

Officers’ accounts

According to Reporter-News

archives, when officers arrived on the scene, they found Richardson’s pickup

caught on an aluminum gate post with the wheels spinning.

The officers

said Richardson did not respond to their verbal commands, and they believed he

was reaching for a .22 caliber rifle, so one of the officers fired into the

truck.

The investigation revealed that both officers fired their weapons

and that the fatal shot was fired from Holt’s gun.

Holt was dispatched to

the scene at 500 Court Street at 12:38 a.m.

Holt, who had been a police

officer for a little less than six years, said when he was approaching the

scene, he noticed a large cloud of smoke coming from a red 2007 Dodge Ram

pickup. Holt said he believed Richardson, who he called “the suspect” was

attempting to drive through the home and wanted to get away from

police.

In his statement, Holt claims he saw Richardson reach down and

touch the scope on the rifle so he opened fire.

Meanwhile Officer Scott

Gabriel arrived on the scene with Wayne McMullen, the city code enforcement

officer who was accompanying him on patrol.

In his statement, Gabriel

said he tried to get Richardson’s attention, by attempting to break out the

windows of the vehicle with a baton or the butt of his revolver, but he could

not.

He then fired shots into the tires of the vehicle and his weapon

jammed. Gabriel said he saw a rifle in the front seat but did not indicate he

saw Richardson reaching for it.

There was only one streetlight

illuminating the area, and Richardson’s windows had a dark tint. In the two to

three minutes from the time Holt arrived to the time shots were fired, Holt

maintains in his statement that he saw Richardson reach for the

rifle.

“Without any other choice, I reacted by firing several shots at

the suspect driver, through the passenger side front window,” Holt wrote in his

report. Holt said he recalled firing seven shots into the

vehicle.

Gabriel was on the driver’s side of the vehicle when he radioed

dispatch that “shots had been fired,” according to his statement.

“I

heard multiple shots being fired from the direction that Officer Holt was at,”

Gabriel reported.

Gabriel said the truck stopped moving, and he went to

the passenger side to assess the situation.

Meanwhile, Holt had radioed

in for an ambulance.

All three officers said Richardson looked at them

with a blank stare, like he did not know what was going on.

One of the

shots hit Richardson just above the right ear and killed him.

When

Gabriel finally got the door of the vehicle open, he noted Richardson was

slumped over to the right side with blood coming from his head. Gabriel assisted

medics in loading Richardson onto the ambulance.

The

aftermath

Texas Ranger Sgt. Shane Morrow was called to the scene to

conduct the investigation.

Immediately after the shooting, Holt was

escorted to the patrol car of DPS Trooper Grant Atkinson. Moments later, the

weapons of Holt, Gabriel and McMullen were confiscated, and the three officers

were taken to the police department where they gave their

statements.

Moments after the shooting, Gabriel reported that he

retrieved the rifle from the passenger side of the vehicle. Atkinson

corroborated that report, saying he offered cover while Gabriel retrieved the

rifle.

“I did not see the exact location of the rifle since I was at the

back of the pickup,” Atkinson’s statement says.

Witness Angelo Santos,

who lived across the street, said he saw an officer break out the driver’s side

window after the shots were fired.

“The officer reached in the driver

side door and grabbed a long brown item that appeared to be a rifle with black

clip … and handed it to a fireman,” Santos recalled in his

statement.

Meanwhile, Richardson was transported to the Stephens County

Memorial Hospital, where doctors pronounced him brain-dead. He was then sent to

Harris Hospital in Fort Worth, where he was pronounced dead. His body was then

transported to the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Officer for an

autopsy.

The next day

Within 24 hours, the Texas Rangers released

Richardson’s bullet-ridden truck to his family.

And the next day, family

and friends gathered at the local wrecking yard for a memorial service to honor

Richardson. They looked at and touched the truck, which was riddled with more

than 20 bullet holes and still had Richardson’s blood covering the

console.

“He never even had a traffic ticket,” his father Wayne

Richardson said at the service.

The truck was impounded again about a

month after the shooting, so investigators could continue the

investigation.

The science

The Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s

Office ruled the death a homicide. Richardson died from a single gunshot wound

behind his right ear, which was determined to have come from Holt’s gun, a .40

caliber Glock semi-automatic handgun.

The autopsy, conducted by Dr. Nizam

Peerwani, revealed that Richardson had an enlarged heart, but there were no

other remarkable findings.

Toxicology results released in February by the

Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office show Richardson’s blood alcohol level

was at .053 percent, below the .08 legal limit for intoxication in

Texas.

The level of the antidepressant citalopram, known by the brand

name Celexa, was found in Richardson’s blood and wasn’t remarkable at 52 NG/ML

(nanograms). Ibuprofen also was detected in his system.

Toxicology

reports taken on the three officers showed that Holt also had 1450 NG/ML of

Celexa in his urine. There were no drugs or other substances detected in results

for Gabriel or McMullen.

Officers’ jobs

Almost immediately

questions swirled around the officers and the circumstances involved in the

shooting. Holt, 29, had only been with the department for one year and eight

months before he was fired. In the five years and seven months that Holt has

been a certified peace officer, he has worked for five law enforcement agencies,

including Breckenridge.

He also worked at the Lamb County Sheriff’s

Office, Idalou Police Department, Borger Police Department, Petersburg Police

Department and as a jailer for the Floyd County Sheriff’s Office, according to

the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education, or

TCLEOSE.

Records now indicate Holt was hired by the Wheeler County

Sheriff’s Office in August. TCLEOSE records do not show that any disciplinary

actions have been filed against him.

Gabriel, 34, remains on the

Breckenridge police force, having worked there his entire career, according to

TCLEOSE records. Gabriel became a certified peace officer in May of

2007.

The family’s hope

Connie Jackson still carries the message

in a fortune cookie that was pulled out of her son’s car the day hundreds of

friends and family gathered at the wrecking yard.

It reads: “A great

honor will be bestowed upon you in the coming year.”

His mother said the

best honor would be answers to this case.

“I would like to get to the

bottom of this and find out why my son was killed,” she said.

In a

perfect world, she wants her son back, but she knows that is

impossible.

“Plus I want my son’s name cleared, of being a drunk and

pulling a gun on a police officer because I want his kids to be able to hold

their heads up and know how respected he was.”

Justice for Mike

In

the days and weeks that followed Richardson’s death, friend and family

questioned the actions of the police.

“It is important for us to make

sure if something like this ever happens again, it is handled without taking a

man’s life,” said Berry, who founded Justice for Mike. “Mike’s family,

especially his young boys, are still feeling the anguish of losing him. Their

pain is as raw as it was one year ago.”

Berry said she and others are

overwhelmed with emotion on the anniversary of Richardson’s death.

“I

hope this story reminds everyone exactly what they have to be thankful for this

year. I am completely overwhelmed with emotion this week,” she said. “I hope

someday we can look back on all this and know we both made a difference

here.”

1,736 total views, 1 views today

CELEXA: Woman Stabs Boyfriend: He Kills Her Before they Die: Florida

Last paragraph reads:  “Lori Adams had Tylenol and traces of the antidepressant Citalopram [Celexa] in her system, according to the toxicology report. She also had a blood alcohol level of .24. Marshall’s blood alcohol level is unclear, officials said. The toxicologist found a .15 level in his liver but could not get a blood alcohol level, Hunter said. He advised that Marshall’s level would have been much lower than Adams’ blood alcohol level.”

Paragraph four reads:  “Investigators have maintained that Lori Adams attacked Marshall first with a 7-inch kitchen knife. While she was able to cut him badly, Marshall managed to take the knife away from Adams and stab her to death, according to statements from investigators and reports from the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office. Marshall then walked around his own home leaving a trail of blood until he slipped and fell next to Adams on the kitchen floor.”

http://www.newsherald.com/news/altha-77024-autopsy-confirms.html

Autopsy confirms double homicide

Lori Adams and Fred Marshall killed one another in rare case, investigators say

August 30, 2009 12:38:00 PM
By S. BRADY CALHOUN / News Herald Writer

ALTHA – The case of the Calhoun County couple who are believed to have killed one another in a knife fight might be at an end.

The autopsies for 46-year-old Lori Adams and 66-year-old Fred Marshall were released to the public Friday. The reports confirm what investigators have said since the couple’s bodies were discovered in Marshall’s Altha home on June 18, that Marshall and Adams killed one another in a rare double homicide.

“Pending some new information we have closed this case,” said Calhoun County Sheriff David Tatum. He added that it was “a very unique crime but a crime wherein both of the offenders and both victims died.”

Investigators have maintained that Adams attacked Marshall first with a 7-inch kitchen knife. While she was able to cut him badly, Marshall managed to take the knife away from Adams and stab her to death, according to statements from investigators and reports from the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office. Marshall then walked around his own home leaving a trail of blood until he slipped and fell next to Adams on the kitchen floor.

One mystery that might never be solved is the exact date of the deaths. At a minimum Marshall and Adams had been dead for a couple of days by the time their bodies were discovered, said Dr. Michael Hunter, the medical examiner for Florida’s 14th Judicial Circuit. However, it is impossible to tell exactly how long their bodies laid next to one another in the kitchen of the Altha home, Hunter said.

The autopsy states that Marshall was stabbed seven times. He had wounds in the upper right chest, the upper right and upper left abdomen, two wounds on his right arm and two more in his left arm. Marshall had one incapacitating wound to his left arm, Hunter said, adding that it would have taken a long time for him to die from those injuries.

Hunter said his findings in Marshall’s death supports the theory that Adams attacked Marshall first and that Marshall took the knife away from her and stabbed her to death.

Adams’ autopsy states that she was stabbed 10 times and had wounds to the face, the upper abdomen, her back and her chest. The killing blow was to the left chest and penetrated Adams’ heart, Hunter wrote. After this blow, Adams would have died very quickly and would not have had time to stab Marshall, he said.

None of the injuries on either victim could be described as self inflicted, Hunter said, ruling out the idea that one party killed the other and then killed himself or herself.

Adams had Tylenol and traces of the antidepressant Citalopram in her system, according to the toxicology report. She also had a blood alcohol level of .24. Marshall’s blood alcohol level is unclear, officials said. The toxicologist found a .15 level in his liver but could not get a blood alcohol level, Hunter said. He advised that Marshall’s level would have been much lower than Adams’ blood alcohol level.

1,615 total views, no views today