4/07/2001 – Insight Mag – Misleading Medicine

Once again Kelly O’Meara has written an incredible article. This time the
subject is the absurdity of the PMDD diagnosis and the prescribing of Prozac
repacked and renamed as “Sarafem” for that “disorder.” We have included the
first several paragraphs for you and encourage you to go to the Insight
Magazine sight to read the rest.

The article gives much insight into the lengths to which Lilly will go to
cover up the fact that Prozac and Sarafem are one in the same drug.
Apparently as long as they do not admit it publicly it is not reality?

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
http://insightmag.com/archive/200104301.shtml

InsightMag.com
——————————————————————————
Misleading Medicine
——————————————————————————
By Kelly Patricia OMeara
komeara@…
——————————————————————————

Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly is promoting Sarafem as a miracle pill for
women suffering from PMDD, a mental disorder not yet proved to exist.
Whats more, Eli Lilly admits that Sarafem has the same active ingredient as
Prozac, complete with the same dangerous side effects.

Australian-born singer Helen Reddys 1972 hit song I Am Woman has been
called a feminist battle hymn. Many a male disc jockey at the time refused to
air it until the song became part of the soundtrack to a movie and catapulted
to the top of the Billboard charts. Taking a look at the song today, its
hard to imagine the furor generated by the lyrics from the lady down under:
Oh, yes, I am wise, but its wisdom born of pain.
Yes, Ive paid the price, but look how much I gained.
If I have to I can do anything.
I am strong. I am invincible. I am woman.
Nearly three decades since the release of this feminist anthem the
lyrics neither threaten nor offend if they ever did but seem to
acknowledge pride in feminine strength. As if it needed to be said,
historians agree on the significance of women in the building of this nation.
The Jamestown settlement, for instance, was a disaster and on the brink of
failure until women were added to the new colony. The West was won by men and
women working side by side, and the United States triumphed over its enemies
in World War II with the help of nearly 500,000 women in the ranks and
millions more in the factories.
Not surprisingly, women achieved these feats completely unaware that a
few days out of each month they were suffering from a mental disorder. Thats
right. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the use of
Sarafem (fluoxetine) for women suffering from a mental disorder just three or
four days a month in the luteal phase or just before the onset of
menses.
This mental disorder which the American Psychiatric Association
(APA) has not yet accepted, but which is listed in the appendix of the APAs
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) is called
premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD. Its a new-and-improved version of
premenstrual syndrome (PMS), which also has not made it to the hit parade of
the official APA list of mental illnesses. The fact that PMDD is listed only
in the diagnostic manuals appendix reflects the APAs desire for further
research before accepting it as a full-fledged mental disorder.
According to the DSM-IV and the FDA, a woman must experience five or
more symptoms before the diagnosis can be made. The unofficial mental
disorder is said to be characterized by the following symptoms:

Markedly depressed mood

Marked anxiety

Marked affectivity

Decreased interest in activities

Feeling sad, hopeless or self-deprecating

Feeling tense, anxious or on edge

Persistent irritability, anger and increased interpersonal conflicts

Feeling fatigued, lethargic or lacking in energy

Marked changes in appetite

A subjective feeling of being overwhelmed or out of control

Physical symptoms such as breast tenderness, swelling or bloating.

Eli Lilly and Co., the Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical company that
makes Sarafem, has been marketing the new treatment with such gusto that
there are jokes about the company exhibiting obsessive-compulsive disorder.
It seems there isnt a magazine to be picked up or a channel to be surfed
that isnt running a Sarafem advertisement.
These ads show women expressing many things. One TV spot depicts a
woman trying to button her slacks and looking angry and agitated. Another
scene shows a woman snapping at her husband, Just leave me alone, while
still another involves a woman slumped on the couch sobbing. Then there is
the slogan: Sarafem More like the woman you are.
Lilly reports in its ads that now, Doctors can treat PMDD with
Sarafem the first and only prescription medication for PMDD. The ad
further states that, Sarafem contains fluoxetine hydrochloride, the same
active ingredient found in Prozac. But both Sarafem and Prozac are
fluoxetine hydrochloride. According to Laura Miller, marketing associate for
Eli Lilly, Fluoxetine hydrochloride is the same active ingredient in Sarafem
as in Prozac. Again and again Insight asked, Then is it the same thing?
Again and again Miller only repeated that the two identical doses of
fluoxetine hydrochloride have the same active ingredient.
Miller refused to acknowledge that Sarafem is just Prozac repackaged,
or that the pill color was changed from green to feminine pink and lavender
to market it for a not-yet-approved mental disorder that never before
existed. The Lilly representative did say the difference in the treatments is
in how women react to the drug.
Never mind that all this dramatic hype, supported by millions of
dollars in marketing, has occurred just before Lilly loses its exclusivity on
Prozac in August. . . . to finish article go to:

http://insightmag.com/archive/200104301.shtml

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3/30/2001 – 60 Minutes Show, April 1 – Clinical Drug Trial Dangers

“Clinical Drug Trial Dangers?”

On Sunday, April 1, at 7 p.m. ET/PT, CBS 60 Minutes will air a
segment entitled “Of Mice And Men.” Steve Kroft reports that
patients taking experimental drugs in clinical trials often don’t
know the doctors administering them are usually being paid by
the drug companies and that the drugs can sometimes worsen
their health.

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3/30/2001 – LSD to Prozac and back to LSD?!

In the last half century we have witnessed Eli Lilly bring America LSD and
then Prozac. Now that the public has been brainwashed about the “benefits” of
Prozac and its clones, it is time to once again attempt to sell us on LSD.
After admitting in this article the truth of the argument I have made for ten
years against the SSRI antidepressants – they work like LSD in the brain (”
Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.”) they now work to sell us on the
“benefits” of LSD. After all, if we can as a society have given similar drugs
– the SSRIs – such a warm welcome, we must now be ready to accept LSD, the
CIA’s drug of choice for a mind control experimentation, with welcome arms as
well.

Has the world gone completely mad?! Obviously! We now have the National
Institute on Drug Abuse encouraging us to use a drug, already declared
dangerous and of no medical use, when they are suppose to educate us on the
dangers of it. Perhaps the name of the institute should be changed to the
National Institute for Production of Drug Abuse. At this point it would
certainly be more appropriate. Clearly they are counting on their lack of
educating the public about drugs to have produced enough public ignorance of
drugs and their effects so as to allow them to get away with this one. As I
have said repeatedly, the drug companies count on our memory loss. They
expect us to forget within a generation our experience with a drug and then
pull the same drug on us again. They generally give it a new name, or a new
twist, but the more you learn about drugs, the more you realize that the
drugs remain the same.

Obviously on this one they are counting on mass stupidity among the general
population for its acceptance. I would hope that everyone of you is working
as hard as you can to educate all around you to the dangers of these drugs.
Time is of the essence! If you have not yet figured out that we are in a
battle for our lives, you have missed something. Our society as we have known
it and our future is at stake. The Brave New World is here. And with them
feeling so confident as to take such a bold and blatant step as this all that
can be said at this point is, “God help us all!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/hallucinogen010322.html

A computer-generated model of the LSD molecule. (Heffter Institute)

MedicalHallucinogens?

Researchers Studying Possible Medical Use of LSD, Peyote, Psilocybin

By Robin Eisner

N E W Y O R K, March 22 Could shrooms or LSD help the mentally ill?

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs
Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed
Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

At Harvard, a psychiatrist is studying whether the hallucinogenic cactus
peyote creates any long-term memory or attention problems in the American
Indians who take the drug as part of religious rituals.

A University of Arizona psychiatrist is poised to begin researching whether
taking the hallucinogen psilocybin under controlled circumstances may help
people suffering with obsessive compulsive disorder.

And another Harvard psychiatrist is in the beginning phases of designing a
protocol that may employ LSD or another hallucinogen to see if it helps
terminally ill people suffering from depression and pain.

With some support from the private New Mexico-based Heffter Institute, these
researchers, along with others in the United States and abroad, represent a
small movement of scientists looking at the possible medical benefits of
hallucinogens for some psychiatric conditions.

Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs

Hallucinogens are among the oldest known group of drugs that have been used
for their ability to alter human perception and mood, according to the Drug
Enforcement Agency. They have been used for medical, social and religious
practices.

More recently, synthetic hallucinogens have been used recreationally, with
hippies from the ’60s, such as the now deceased ex-Harvard psychology
professor Timothy Leary, first promoting their use with the famous slogan,
Turn on, Tune in, Drop Out.

Today, hallucinogens are deemed drugs of abuse by the DEA, with no known
medical benefit. Approximately 8 percent to 10 percent of high school
seniors tried a hallucinogen in the past year according to a University of
Michigan study of drug use.

It remains unclear how these drugs exert their action in the brain, but
anecdotal evidence and some earlier studies indicate they may help a variety
of psychiatric conditions, says David E. Nichols, founder of the Heffter
Institute, in Santa Fe, and professor of medical chemistry and molecular
pharmacology at Purdue School of Pharmacy in West Lafayette, Ind.

Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.

He founded the institute in 1993 to help give scientific credibility to
medical research on hallucinogens. After years of fund-raising, the
institute now has enough money to help scientists do serious research.

Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed

Since opinions are so strongly held about hallucinogens, it is essential
that any studies in this area be performed with the most rigorous modern
methods and great care to have an impartial approach, says Dr. Harrison
Pope, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who is leading the
four-year peyote study in American Indians.

Funded largely by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and Heffter, Popes
group will be comparing three populations of American Indians peyote users
in religious ceremonies, alcoholics, and local tribespeople to see if
peyote use is associated with cognitive problems.

Pope is also developing a trial to follow up on studies from the ’60s and
’70s suggesting that hallucinogens helped ease anxiety and depression in the
terminally ill and also reduced their need for pain medication.

The challenge is to design the study in such a way that if the drug shows
benefits, skeptics are convinced, and if it doesnt help, proponents of
hallucinogenic use dont challenge the research as inadequate, Pope says.

Psilocybin mushroom

These studies take time to develop to get that scientific imprimatur. They
also need to get review, by local medical institutions and governmental
regulatory authorities. The DEA and the FDA is still reviewing a protocol by
Dr. Francisco Moreno, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University
of Arizona in Tucson, hoping to study a chemically synthesized psilocybin
for obsessive-compulsives. His hospital gave him permission to start the
study.

A protocol of psilocybin and depression in Switzerland also is undergoing
revision before it is submitted to the government authorities there, Nichols
says.

Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

Some scientists, however, question the potential risks of these studies.

The problem with this kind of research is that when average people hear or
read about them in this preliminary stage they might think these drugs could
be good for them now, says Una McCann, associate professor of psychiatry at
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. But it remains unknown until the studies
are finished, McCann says.

Dr. Gregory Collins the director of the Alcohol and Drug Recovery program at
the Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio, believes the risks outweigh any
benefits.

Some of these drugs have been shown to have long-term consequences in
healthy people, Collins says. I would be reluctant to try them in the
mentally ill.

Nichols, however, defends the research. I think we will find some medical
benefit of these drugs, Nichols says. There is no other drug class that
doesnt have some medical utility.

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3/29/2001 – Celexa recommended for elderly

This is beyond sickening! Celexa has the strongest effect upon serotonin
reuptake as any of the other SSRIs and is therefore, the most dangerous in
this group of serotonergic drugs. To encourage it for use in the elderly,
some of the most vulnerable in our society, for minor depression is
unconscionable!

Now that the ad has run in Medscape encouraging doctors to prescribe it (as
if they needed any encouragement in their mass drugging of America!) you may
want to begin checking the obituaries for large numbers of the elderly dying.
Of course it will save the government lots of $$$ in Social Security payments!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org
_
Subject: Psychiatry MedPulse 02-Mar-01 — MEDSCAPE
______________________________________________________________________
MEDSCAPE’s Psychiatry MedPulse(R) <<<
http://psychiatry.medscape.com
_______________________________________________________________________

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3/24/2001 – 5 Drug Makers Use Material With Possible Mad Cow Link

We have heard much about Mad Cow disease (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) lately.
Little of what we have heard comes close to truth about the spreading of mad
cow in America. Two major news shows, 20/20 and 60 Minutes, have covered this
issue in the last couple of weeks. 60 Minutes came a little closer to the
truth than 20/20.

I could not understand why the 20/20 segment was asking if we have Mad Cow in
America and the 60 Minutes segment stated we do not have any cases here yet
when we have known for some time that Mad Cow disease (Creutzfeldt-Jakob) is
in this country. In fact the CDC came to Utah about three years ago to
investigate several deaths from Mad Cow that we had in one year – one was the
man featured in the 20/20 segment. Another of the deaths was a city official
whose death gained much public attention and generated several local news
stories on mad cow. Then while I was in Arizona in October I ran across an
article from a Tucson paper that discussed the wife of an attorney who died
of Mad Cow disease (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) in September, 2000. The
article stated that her death was the SECOND death from Creutzfeldt-Jakob
disease in Tucson alone this year. Consider this information when we know
that France’s Mad Cow scare was generated by two mad cow deaths in one year
for the whole country. When you compare France’s cases of CJD against their
population base with Tucson’s two deaths in one city in one year and Utah’s
cases with a population base of only about 1 million you get some idea of the
magnitude of this problem in America.

Several months ago I sent you an article from the LA Times (still archived in
our e-group, entitled “A Wonder Drug That Carried the Seeds of Death”). The
article featured the high number of deaths among patients involved in a
National Institutes of Health study conducted in the early 80’s. They found
that 25% of the patients involved who received a growth hormone in this
project are now dying of Mad Cow disease. Now, in case you missed it last
month, the New York Times revealed that five drug companies have been using
material that may have been tainted with Mad Cow. The warnings and drugs
involved are listed in the articles below. Most patients are unaware of how
many animal products are contained in medications.

Isn’t it interesting that 20/20 nor 60 Minutes did not even hint at this
issue in their show on Mad Cow disease in America? Even our local ABC station
here went on after the 20/20 piece to assure us that we have safe meat in
Utah when it was the same station who ran a piece a couple of years ago on
the city official who died of Mad Cow.

Keep in mind as you read how remote they estimate the possiblity of
contracting Mad Cow from these drugs is, that they told patients who took
Fen-Phen and Redux that their possibility of contracting Primary Pulmonary
Hypertension was about the same. Those now suffering PPH would certainly tell
you that it was never worth the risk.

In light of this information I sure do hope you didn’t get your flu shot!

This whole Mad Cow issue is a lesson in how stupid it is to take an animal
that is strickly vegitarian and turn them into a canibal just because it will
make them grow faster and bring in the big $$$ faster. As the LA times
pointed out in an article in this past Sunday’s edition, quoting Dr. Neal
Barnard who heads the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine, in
light of the wide numbers of diseases that come from eating animal products
it is time for us all to seriously consider vegitarianism. In light of the
following article he should also include avoiding medications.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawawerness.org

February 8, 2001 Single-Page Format

By MELODY PETERSEN and GREG WINTER

——————————————————————————

For the last eight years, the Food and Drug Administration has repeatedly
asked pharmaceutical companies not to use materials from cattle raised in
countries where there is a risk of mad cow disease.

But regulators discovered last year that five companies, including some of
the world’s largest drug concerns, were still using ingredients from those
countries to make nine widely used vaccines.

Some of the companies say that they found the F.D.A.’s request unclear and do
not believe they did anything wrong. Others say they could not keep up with
the government’s expanding list of countries where cattle could be infected.
One, however, acknowledged that it could have moved more quickly.

The nine vaccines include some regularly given to millions of American
children, including common vaccines to prevent polio, diphtheria and tetanus.
They also include the anthrax vaccine, which the government requires for
soldiers serving in the Persian Gulf.

Federal health officials stress that the vaccines are still considered safe.
They calculate that the odds of these vaccines passing on the disease, in the
worst eventualities, are between one in 40 million and one in 40 billion
doses.

The officials say that the very slight chance that someone could be infected
is far outweighed by the benefits that these vaccines bring in fighting
disease and preventing death. Indeed, it is now only a scientific theory that
a vaccine could infect someone with the human form of mad cow disease called
new variant Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease. No one is known to have contracted
the disease this way.

“Any risk is very remote,” said Dr. Karen Midthune, director of the F.D.A.’s
Office of Vaccine Research and Review. “But if we have the ability to bring
this remote risk to zero, that is something we want to do.”

Nonetheless, the fact that these suspect materials slipped into the nation’s
vaccine supply and that the F.D.A. did not discover it for seven years
raises questions about the agency’s ability to ensure that all medicines are
free of the infectious proteins that can cause mad cow disease.

The F.D.A. so far has only investigated the vaccine makers and has not looked
to see whether other medicine is free of possible mad cow contaminants. Some
experts say they worry more about dietary supplements. Unlike drugs,
supplements are largely unregulated. The F.D.A. is not even sure how many
supplement makers there are.

“It’s just insane not to have greater safeguards” for supplements, said Dr.
Paul W. Brown, chairman of the F.D.A.’s advisory committee on mad cow
disease. “The potential exists for abuse.”

All five vaccine makers, which include GlaxoSmithKline, Aventis and American
Home Products, have now agreed to stop using the suspect materials, which
include blood, fetal calf serum and meat broth.

But it will take a year or more to replace existing supplies with
reformulated products, because it can take many months to grow cultures used
in making vaccines. Both the companies and the F.D.A. say that the current
products are safe and should remain on pharmacy shelves.

They point out that the suspect ingredients, for the most part, are used only
in the early stages of manufacturing, when cultures are grown. Blood, for
instance, may be used to feed the bacteria and viruses in these cultures. The
cultures are then significantly diluted in the final vaccine.

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/08/health/08CONS.html

February 8, 2001
The Vaccines in Question

——————————————————————————

An outside committee of health experts and federal regulators has reviewed
the risk of contracting the human equivalent of mad cow disease from several
vaccines and has concluded that the risk is remote and only theoretical. No
one is known to have been infected by a vaccine. The United States Public
Health Service said in December that all people should continue to be
vaccinated. The service said there was no need to select one vaccine over
another.

The Food and Drug Administration calculates that at the worst the risk of
contracting the disease from one dose of a bacterial vaccine, such as a
vaccine to protect against tetanus, is one in 40 million.

And with viral vaccines, like the one against polio, the F.D.A. estimates
that the risk is far lower no more than one in 40 billion.

More information is available on the Web at www.fda .gov/cber/bse/bse.htm.

Here is the list of vaccines that use cattle materials from countries where
the government says there is a risk of mad cow disease:

ActHIB, sold by Aventis Pasteur, to prevent infection by the haemophilus
influenzae Type B bacterium.

OmniHIB, sold by GlaxoSmithKline, to protect against haemophilus influenzae
Type B.

Infanrix, sold by Glaxo SmithKline, to prevent diphtheria, tetanus and
pertussis.

Havrix, sold by GlaxoSmithKline, to prevent hepatitis A.

Certiva, sold by North American Vaccine, now a unit of Baxter International,
to prevent diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis.

Vaccines that use cattle materials of unknown geographic origin are:

IPOL, sold by Aventis Pasteur, to prevent polio.

Pnu-Imune 23, sold by American Home Products’ Lederle Laboratories, to
prevent pneumococcal diseases.

Anthrax vaccine, sold by BioPort.

Rabies vaccine, sold by BioPort.

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3/24/2001 – Med school study reveals unethical practices

Thanks to Daryl Duhamel in Canada for sending us an article from Canada’s
National Post newspaper.

The National Post online alert.

March 23, 2001

Med school study reveals unethical practices
Unnecessary exams, practising on dead at teaching hospitals

Margaret Munro
National Post

Medical students frequently face pressure to act
unethically and most say they have seen their clinical teachers acting
unethically as well, a study by researchers at the University of Toronto has
found.

The study surveyed 108 medical students and found that
47% said
they “very frequently,” “frequently” or “occasionally” felt pressure to act
unethically. Almost two-thirds of the students had also seen their teacher
behave unethically.

The study listed some of the unethical activities,
including practising procedures on dying patients and conducting unnecessary
examinations on unconscious ones.

Some students at the University of Toronto’s teaching
hospitals were asked to conduct vaginal exams on patients under general
anaesthetic without their consent. One described being told to perform an
unnecessary “femoral stab,” which involves locating a vein, on a dying
patient who was in a vegetative state and without getting any family consent.

Another watched as a woman who had asked not to be given
narcotics as she gave birth was given the potent drugs without her knowledge.
The study was conducted by five young doctors who recently trained at the
university. The results will be published in the British Medical Journal on
Saturday.

“It’s not as if it happens every day,” says co-author
David Robertson, who is about to graduate from the medical school. But it is
disturbing to know it happens at all, he says.

The students, some of whom reported being “scared to
death” of professors barking orders at them, also described how patients’
identities and medical problems were described in public places. The students
were also expected to perform procedures they were not competent to handle,
such as closing wounds, assessing unstable patients and giving psychotherapy.
They also report that patients were sometimes asked to return to clinics for
unnecessary follow-up visits that were only for the students’ benefit.

U of T medical school officials say they are familiar
with the study’s findings and are working to put an end to such
“reprehensible” activities.

“We’re aware of it and distressed by it and trying to
stamp it out,” said Dr. Rick Frecker, associate dean of
the university’s undergraduate medical education.

Dr. Frecker said no action was taken against professors
involved, as the identities of the students and doctors were protected as
part of the study, which was conducted a few years ago.

He said there would be serious repercussions for
professors if the students were to bring such cases of unethical behavior to
his attention today.

Dr. Frecker said he was approached a few years ago by Mr.
Robertson and a group of concerned students wondering what
could be done about the unethical activities and coercion that have long been
part of medical training. He said he encouraged the students to document
specific cases in a bid to raise awareness of the problem.

He and other university officials were surprised to learn
yesterday that the findings will be showcased in the
prestigious British Medical Journal, which is publishing the students’
findings and has an editorial and commentary condemning the “hypocrisy” in
the medical profession.

“There may have been a time when doctors could get away
with being trustworthy in public, but despicable in private, but this is an
age where no secret is kept for long and really all doctors should know
better,” says the commentary by Andrew West and colleagues at Oxford
University.

“The medical profession urgently needs to learn respect
for the living and for the dead, and thereby earn the public respect that is
its lifeblood,” they conclude.

In the editorial, medical ethicist Len Doyal, of the
Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, says the Toronto findings are
likely relevant to medical education in schools around the world. They
reinforce the need for detailed codes of acceptable activities in medical
education to prevent abuse of both patients and students, he wrote.

Mr. Robertson said in an interview that such policies
need to be backed by a culture that is receptive to change.

He said the University of Toronto medical school is
“moving in the right direction.”

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3/18/2001 – New MMR link to autism

Additional immunization woes surface linking autism once again to the MMR
vaccine. Parents with infants facing immunizations should be warned of this
as it always takes years for authorities like the FDA or CDC to get around to
doing it.

What is interesting to note is the leaky gut connection to brain damage
mentioned in the article. Reports of leaky gut are quite common with the
SSRIs as well as is the report of autistic tendencies.

We know that high serotonin levels are linked to autism.

And we know that over 90% of the serotonin in the body is produced in the
colon. (This is why so many intestinal side effects are related to these
serotonergic medications.)

The next piece of the puzzle would be to learn that high serotonin is linked
to the leaky gut. I believe that Dr. Michael Gershon at Columbia Presbyterian
has given us that information in his research on intestinal problems and
SSRIs, indicating that these side effects come from the high serotonin. The
answers to this connection should be found in his new book “The Gut Brain”.

For additional information on vaccines producing problems in brain function
and brain toxicity go to the www.drugawareness.org site and read “US
Congressman Dan Burton Requests Immediate Vaccine Recall.” Congressman Burton
is concerned about the mercury content in vaccines. Mark has posted this
article on our front page this month.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

Sunday 18 March 2001

New MMR link to autism

The most compelling evidence to date of a link between MMR injections and
autism has been announced by scientists. Researchers working on two separate
studies have linked brain dysfunction to physical abnormalities which could
have been triggered by the multiple vaccine. The new evidence is based on
clinical tests rather than analysis of statistical information. Scientists
investigated the physical symptoms and were able to put samples rather than
numbers under the microscope.

The head of Britain’s Autism Research Unit said the studies represented the
most important research into the condition ever carried out. Until now autism
has been seen as a purely mental disorder. One report from the Royal Free
Hospital in London has now found that many autistic children suffer from a
condition know as ‘leaky gut syndrome,’ a disease which damages the walls of
the intestine and is often found in children with autism, but is rare among
other children. Research suggests that these symptoms could be triggered by a
reaction to the MMR jab. Simon Murch, child specialist and the report’s
author, believes the studies represent an important advance: ‘We have shown
for the first time in a properly controlled study a clear link between gut
inflammation and brain damage.’ A second study conducted in the US suggests
that vaccines can cause children’s immune systems to go out of control. The
study investigated 35 autistic children and found 27 had abnormal immune
systems, with the abnormalities apparently triggered by vaccines or other
external factors.

Government officials treated the results with caution yesterday. David
Salisbury, head of vaccines at the Department of Health, said his advisors
had examined evidence from the Royal Free hospital and could not support
their findings: ‘We have looked at this work and the conclusions are not
convincing,’ he said.

Sunday Express

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3/17/2001 – Doctor Links Viagra to Five Cases of Blindness

I have made the statement before that Viagra is a very dangerous drug and the
only good thing about it is that it will give Pfizer the funds they need to
pay off all of their Zoloft wrongful death suits while it remains to be seen
which new Pfizer drug will bring in the funds to pay off all of the Viagra
damage suits.

It appears the serious physical effects have begun to surface in spite of
most major drug company’s ability to suppress this type of information.

A Washington State man claimed Viagra drove him to attack a woman with a
hammer soon after the drug was released. And I just investigated the case of
a police officer who committed a murder/suicide while on Viagra. It will be
interesting to see how many more reports begin to come in as the public
becomes more aware of the serious effects of this new wonder drug.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/htx/nm/20010312/hl/viagra_blind_1.html

Monday March 12 12:07 PM ET

Doctor Links Viagra to Five Cases of Blindness

By Edward Tobin

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A US ophthalmologist says there
appears to be a very small risk that men taking the
impotence drug Viagra could suffer permanent vision
loss, but the firm that makes the drug on Friday
played down the reported threat.

Howard Pomeranz, director of neuro-ophthalmology at
the University of Maryland Medical Center, said he
knows of five men across the United States who were
diagnosed with permanent vision loss by doctors after
taking the impotence drug. More than 10 million people
have taken the drug since it was approved in 1998.

The condition, called ischemic optic neuropathy, is
caused after blood flow is cut off to the optic nerve
in the eyeball. It usually occurs in people with
diabetes, hypertension and other vascular disorders.

A spokesman for Pfizer Inc., which makes Viagra,
dismissed Pomeranz’s observations, which were first
presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology
Conference in Dallas in November. The company
spokesman told Reuters that the three-year old product
is not a threat to its users.

“From all clinical experience with Viagra, there have
been no cases of treatment-related blindness reported,
and reports of serious visual problems have been
extremely rare,” said Geoff Cook, the Pfizer
spokesman.

Viagra, which is available in 100 countries, is known
to cause some temporary vision problems such as
blue/green color distortions in some patients.

Blood Flow To Optic Nerve Constricted

Pomeranz said the five men diagnosed with the
condition after taking Viagra had a low cup-to-disk
ratio, which is a way doctors measure the small
circular indentation where the optic nerve connects to
the eyeball.

The low cup-to-disk ratio means that the blood vessels
and nerves are tightly bundled together into the small
space in the back of the eye, according to a
University of Maryland release about the issue.

“We know that Viagra regulates a chemical in the body
to constrict the arteries. The constriction may cut
off the blood flow to the optic nerve, especially in
people with a low cup-to-disk ratio, where the blood
vessels and nerves are tightly bundled,” Pomeranz
said in the release.

Pfizer’s Cook associated potential permanent visual
damage with the known risk factors for men taking the
drug, such as diabetes, and not the drug itself.

“In the population of men who take Viagra, many men
with diabetes and other conditions have significant
associations with long term visual problems,” he
said.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which
reviews reports of drug side effects, said it had not
received any complaints of sudden blindness in
patients taking Viagra.

“We do not have any reports of people losing their
sight like that,” FDA spokeswoman Susan Cruzan said.

“We would take any such reports seriously, and we
encourage health professionals to submit any such
information to us,” she added.

Leonard Yaffe, analyst with Banc of America
Securities, said more information was needed before
evaluating what effect the report would have on
Pfizer. “I’d want to know how often the men were
taking the drug, for how long a period of time?” he
said. “You need to know a lot more than these five
guys had this problem.”

Pomeranz, who is also assistant professor of
ophthalmology and neurology at the University of
Maryland School of Medicine, called for more research
into the matter.

“People who take Viagra who have this particular
configuration of their optic nerve at least need to be
aware that this is a potential problem that may occur
if they use this medication,” he said. “Whether this
is a significant increased risk, I don’t have the
statistics to back that up.”

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3/13/2001 – March Edition of drugawareness.org now online.

The March edition of the ICFDA www.drugawareness.org site is
now on line. So much has been happening lately, that’s it’s been
difficult to keep up with all the news. But, please take a look
when you can. There are just a sampling of some very important
stories that are posted there.
——-
1/22/01 Doctors and Patients Don’t Talk About Antidepressant
Side Effects
By Carla Cantor, CBS HEALTH WATCH

A new public health survey reveals that nearly half of the people
being treated with antidepressants experience side effects and
55% of those patients stop taking their medication, rather than
talk to their doctors about the issue.

2/19/01 Prescriptions: How your doctor makes the choice
By Joseph P. Shapiro and Stacey Schultz [US NEWS]

Three years ago, doctors at the Everett Clinic in Washington
State took a hard look at the stream of pharmaceutical sales
reps filing into their offices. “Enough!” they said. Then they
closed their doors on the cheery “detailers” who vied for their
attention each day, lugging suitcases of free drug samples.
Medical director Al Fisk, who masterminded the move,
suspected that the samples were skewing his doctors’ drug
choices toward the most heavily promoted drugs–even when
less expensive ones were just as effective. “There’s a reason
why the pharmaceutical business spends [billions] on physician
detailing,” he says. “It’s easy to influence prescribing habits.”

2/24/01 Drug Firms Treat PMS As a Mental Disorder
By TARA PARKER-POPE, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, As
appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Section B, Front Page

IS SEVERE PMS, or premenstrual syndrome, a mental illness?
Some pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrists are treating
it as one. In new television ads, drug maker Eli Lilly is promoting
the drug Sarafem to treat the problem, now dubbed
Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD). But the pink and
purple pills aren’t a new drug — they are simply repackaged
Prozac, the popular antidepressant.

3/11/01 Paper: Co. Knew of Drug-Liver Link

Warner-Lambert Co. downplayed liver damage concerns as it
sought federal approval for its diabetes drug Rezulin, the Los
Angeles Times reported Sunday.

2/24/01 Paxil Lawsuit

This is our 2nd update (“sitrep” or “situation report”) in our Paxil
withdrawal lawsuit (“Nguyen & Farber v SmithKline Beecham
Corporation”). We filed the case August 18, 2000 against
SmithKline (now “GlaxoSmithKline) in Superior Court, Santa
Clara County, San Jose, California.

2/19/01 Urgent Phenylpropanolamine Recall

Read more about the FDA warning about drugs containing the
ingredient Phenylpropanolamine found in many common over
the counter medications.

3/3/01 US Congressman Dan Burton Requests Immediate
Vaccine Recall

3/5/01 Use of Painkiller Grows Quickly, Along With Widespread
Abuse, By BARRY MEIER and MELODY PETERSEN THE NEW
YORK TIMES

…when the salesman suggested that OxyContin (which is as
potent as morphine) was safe enough to treat short-term pain,
Dr. Leong exploded. “We threw him out of my office,” said Dr.
Leong.

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