ANTIDEPRESSANTS-ANTIPSYCHOTICS: Man Threatens UT Gov, Judge, Prosecutor, etc

In an affidavit filed in Provo’s 4th District Court, Herrin wrote that
Taylor underwent psychological evaluations at the Utah State Hospital, where he
was previously confined for one year and nine months, and was arrested in 2004
for allegedly threatening Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. A doctor who oversaw Taylor’s
treatment after his release from the Utah State Hospital said Taylor is prone to
violence when he is not taking antipsychotic and antidepressant
medications.

Orem man charged with threatening officials

Jeremy Duda – DAILY HERALD | Posted: Monday, March 17,
2008 11:00 pm | No
Comments Posted

Defense attorneys have requested a competency hearing for an Orem man who is
charged with threatening a number of high-profile public officials, including a
judge, a police chief and Lt. Gov. Gary Herbert.

Bradley Roberts Taylor, 42, was charged in late February with one count of
terroristic threats, a second-degree felony, after a Utah Highway Patrol trooper
who is responsible for protecting dignitaries at the Utah State Capitol said she
learned of threatening e-mails to Herbert and Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem. Trooper
Carolina Herrin wrote that Taylor also made threatening comments about Judge

John Backlund of Orem’s 4th District Court, Orem police Chief Michael Larsen and
Orem city prosecutor Robert Church.

Taylor will be evaluated by two doctors before his next hearing, which is
scheduled for April 23, according to prosecutor Chad Grunander. In an affidavit
filed in Provo’s 4th District Court, Herrin wrote that Taylor underwent
psychological evaluations at the Utah State Hospital, where he was previously
confined for one year and nine months, and was arrested in 2004 for allegedly
threatening Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. A doctor who oversaw Taylor’s treatment after
his release from the Utah State Hospital said Taylor is prone to violence when
he is not taking antipsychotic and antidepressant medications.

According to the affidavit, Taylor said in an e-mail to Herbert that he has
been a victim of government tyranny and oppression for the past 20 years. Taylor
wrote to Herbert that he wanted the government to return his driver’s license
and dismiss DUI charges that were filed against him. In an e-mail to Daw, he
wrote that he wanted his Second Amendment rights to be restored, Herrin said.
Taylor sent more than 63 threatening e-mails to Daw, including one in November
in which he wrote that he has “no problem using justifiable lethal force in self
defense,” and, “If I have to defend myself, it will be a bloody revolution,”
according to Herrin’s affidavit.

Taylor also referenced a February shooting spree in which Charles Lee
Thornton killed five people at a city council meeting in Kirkwood, Mo. Thornton
had a long history of disagreements and hostility with city officials.

“Now, I demand justice, liability and victim reparation for the 20 years of
hell,” Taylor wrote, according to Herrin’s affidavit. “I want to avoid
bloodshed, but I see no other way. The spirit of the Lord has revealed to me
that revolution is inevitable.”

Taylor is being held at the Utah County Jail on $100,000 cash-only bail.
Grunander said the case is stayed while court officials await the results of his
psychological evaluation.

“I can’t speak to what his specific intentions were with respect to the
allegations, but certainly, having received a case like this from law
enforcement, this is a case we treat very seriously,” Grunander said. “We’re
very serious about addressing this matter and finding out what Mr. Taylor was up
to, and I think the $100,000 cash-only bail is evidence of the seriousness of
this case.”

Herrin wrote that she spoke with Taylor’s roommate and another close friend
of his, both of whom said that Taylor is extremely violent, speaks often of
killing and harming government officials, and is “just waiting for the right
opportunity to present itself.” Taylor’s roommate and friend said that he has
owned several weapons and is an avid shooter.

Posted in Local on Monday, March 17,
2008 11:00 pm

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sex Abuse: Woman (32) Has Affair with 14 Year Old Boy: PA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Finally someone involved in one of these cases is beginning to
connect the dots back to medication. She thought it was the anti-anxiety drugs
without knowing that it is rare for one of these cases not to involve an
antidepressant, not an anti-anxiety med, even though they would certainly
contribute as well. But antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. One of those types of mania is
nymphomania.
TWO ANTIDEPRESSANTS given together???!!!! When are doctors
ever going to learn that they cannot do that without expecting toxic
reactions?!
_____________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228
Park St., Grove City, told Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove
City psychiatrist
had prescribed her four separate anti-anxiety
medications
and two anti-depressants, all of which she
was to take daily.”

Paragraph 5 reads:  “Defense attorney Veronica
Smith said prior to Mrs. Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal life as a wife, mother,
and worker.”

Published October 28, 2009 10:01 pm –

UPDATE: Woman blames drugs for sex with

boy

By Matt Snyder
Herald Staff Writer

PINE TOWNSHIP ­

A former Pine Township woman facing felony
charges for having sex with a boy while he was 14 and she was 32 blamed her
actions on judgment clouded by taking multiple anti-anxiety
medications.

Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228 Park St., Grove City, told
Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove City psychiatrist had prescribed
her four separate anti-anxiety medications and two anti-depressants, all of
which she was to take daily.

“So, essentially the main responsibility for
this is the medication, not you?” asked a somewhat incredulous Miles K. Karson
Jr., assistant district attorney.

“Essentially, yes,” Woodley replied.
She said she does not think she ever would have slept with the boy or been
involved in other petty criminal cases if not for the meds. “My mind was not
clear,” she said.

Defense attorney Veronica Smith said prior to Mrs.
Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal
life as a wife, mother, and worker.

Reed sentenced Ms. Woodley to 6 to 12
months, just under the standard range for statutory sexual assault and unlawful
contact with a minor. She will be paroled after six months, he said, if she
behaves herself in Mercer County Jail.

Mrs. Woodley will also be on
probation for 16 years and must register as a Megan’s Law sex

offender.

According to police, Mrs. Woodley and the boy, who is now 15,
knew each other through a relative. She started picking him up after school in
September of 2008, and went for rides or walks in the park. Her husband once
said the two acted like “two teenagers in love.”

Mrs. Woodley said things
got out of hand Oct. 27, 2008, and she had sex with the boy against her better
judgment.

“After it was all done, remorse set in and I realized what had
just happened. After that I took him home,” she said.

The boy’s father
told police the next day that Mrs. Woodley had seduced his son. Both parents
attended Mrs. Woodley’s sentencing. They did not speak, but Karson said they
wanted to show their continued desire for a prosecution.

The boy told
police he and Mrs. Woodley kissed and talked about getting serious, but both
acknowledged their age difference.

After charges were filed, Mrs. Woodley
sent a letter to the boy while he was on the school bus through her 8-yearold

son. Charges of intimidating witnesses and corruption of minors were dropped in
that case as part of her plea.

Mrs. Woodley said she had sent the letter
because she wanted to know how he was doing. She said she’d sent him letters
through her son in the past.

As part of her probation, Mrs. Woodley will
not be allowed contact with underage children besides her own, unless a
responsible adult is present to supervise.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN MEDS: Man in Wheelchair Robs Bank: Florida

Paragraph nine reads:  “Reed lost the use of both of his
legs in 1986 from a gunshot wound. One of his legs was amputated just five
months before the robbery. His attorney argued he was
on anti-depressants and pain medication at the time.”

http://www.wftv.com/countybycounty/20813137/detail.html

Wheelchair-Bound Bank Robber Sentenced To Jail

Posted: 12:32 pm EDT September 9, 2009Updated: 1:16 pm EDT September 9,
2009

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. — The man who robbed a bank in his

wheelchair, and then hid the money in his prosthetic leg, was back in court
Wednesday morning. Christopher Reed entered a guilty plea and will serve time in
jail.

Reed wasn’t given any breaks because of his physical condition. In
fact, Judge John Harris said robbing the bank and threatening to blow it up were
both serious offenses. He ended up following sentencing guidelines and sent Reed
to prison for three years.

Reed, 48, took responsibility for his crimes,
apologizing from his wheelchair.

“I would like to say to the employees
and customers … that I am very, very sorry for my actions that day,” Reed said.

The paraplegic Merritt Island man drove his motorized wheelchair into
Space Coast Credit Union in November 2008. With a black stick and a lighter in
his hand, he told the teller he wanted $40,000 or he was going to blow the bank
up.

Reed’s defense attorney, though, in asking for leniency, said he
never caused any panic.

“Customer actually held the door for Mr. Reed
after Mr. Reed had just robbed the bank,” Reed’s attorney argued.

Reed
was caught not far from the bank. The sheriff’s helicopter was barely in the air
when he was spotted nearby. Deputies found $1,300 stuffed in his prosthetic leg.

Reed lost the use of both of his legs in 1986 from a gunshot wound. One
of his legs was amputated just five months before the robbery. His attorney
argued he was on anti-depressants and pain medication at the time.

The
judge, though, noted he faced 30 year years in prison before the plea agreement.

“These are very serious crimes that you have committed here,” Judge
Harris said.

The judge sentenced him to 34 months in prison and three
years of probation and he isn’t allowed into a Space Coast Credit Union again.
His attorney tried to get a lighter sentence, questioning whether there were
adequate facilities for men in Reed’s condition, but Judge John Harris shot that
notion down right away.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN KILLERS: MAN IN WHEELCHAIR ROBS BANK: FL

Paragraph nine reads:  “Reed lost the use of both of his
legs in 1986 from a gunshot wound. One of his legs was amputated just five
months before the robbery. His attorney argued he was
on anti-depressants and pain medication at the time.”

http://www.wftv.com/countybycounty/20813137/detail.html

Wheelchair-Bound Bank Robber Sentenced To Jail

Posted: 12:32 pm EDT September 9, 2009Updated: 1:16 pm EDT September 9,
2009

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. — The man who robbed a bank in his

wheelchair, and then hid the money in his prosthetic leg, was back in court
Wednesday morning. Christopher Reed entered a guilty plea and will serve time in
jail.

Reed wasn’t given any breaks because of his physical condition. In
fact, Judge John Harris said robbing the bank and threatening to blow it up were
both serious offenses. He ended up following sentencing guidelines and sent Reed
to prison for three years.

Reed, 48, took responsibility for his crimes,
apologizing from his wheelchair.

“I would like to say to the employees
and customers … that I am very, very sorry for my actions that day,” Reed said.

The paraplegic Merritt Island man drove his motorized wheelchair into
Space Coast Credit Union in November 2008. With a black stick and a lighter in
his hand, he told the teller he wanted $40,000 or he was going to blow the bank
up.

Reed’s defense attorney, though, in asking for leniency, said he
never caused any panic.

“Customer actually held the door for Mr. Reed
after Mr. Reed had just robbed the bank,” Reed’s attorney argued.

Reed
was caught not far from the bank. The sheriff’s helicopter was barely in the air
when he was spotted nearby. Deputies found $1,300 stuffed in his prosthetic leg.

Reed lost the use of both of his legs in 1986 from a gunshot wound. One
of his legs was amputated just five months before the robbery. His attorney
argued he was on anti-depressants and pain medication at the time.

The
judge, though, noted he faced 30 year years in prison before the plea agreement.

“These are very serious crimes that you have committed here,” Judge
Harris said.

The judge sentenced him to 34 months in prison and three
years of probation and he isn’t allowed into a Space Coast Credit Union again.
His attorney tried to get a lighter sentence, questioning whether there were
adequate facilities for men in Reed’s condition, but Judge John Harris shot that
notion down right away.

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DEPRESSION MED: Amnesia: Woman Can’t Remember Taking Money: Canada

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.”

SSRI Stories note:  Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side-effect of SSRI antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference.

http://bugleobserver.canadaeast.com/news/article/770522

Woman shows up for trial with ‘lost’ cash

Published Tuesday August 25th, 2009

Nackawic woman found not guilty of stealing community fundraising, but judge finds her story ‘fishy’

A provincial court judge said he could not convict a Nackawic woman of theft, despite finding her testimony unbelievable.

Judge John J. Walsh announced his decision in a Woodstock courtroom Friday morning, finding Julie Boone, 34, not guilty of the crime of theft under $5,000.

“Her explanations were not logical, nor were they rational,” the judge said as he read his decision.

Boone’s trial began in May, as former members of the Nackawic Community Days committee took the stand, testifying about the disappearance of approximately $800 raised at a dance in 2007, a dance held to raise money for Nackawic Community Days, a dance where Boone worked the door and was supposed to deposit the funds raised into an account for the committee.

But somewhere along the way, the money was lost, or, as the Crown alleged, stolen by Boone.

On the first day of the trial back in May, another former committee member, Julie Brown, testified the dance had been Boone’s idea.

Brown said when the committee met following the dance, in June 2007, Boone told the committee she’d dropped the money in the night deposit box at the Scotiabank branch in Nackawic, a total of about $800.

But according to Brown, a bank statement didn’t show the deposit.

Later on, it was learned an envelope containing receipts had been dropped in the night deposit slot at the CIBC branch in Nackawic, which is situated in the same mall as the Scotiabank.

Brown told the court Boone was evasive as the committee tried to track the money down.

“Every time I talked to her there was a new excuse,” Brown said.

Brown said the money was never found or recovered.

The trial was adjourned to Aug. 19, at which time, Boone took the stand in her own defence.

According to Boone, she had worked the door at the Saturday dance by herself, although she said there were supposed to be two other volunteers, but they didn’t show up.

Following the dance, Boone said she’d placed the money in an envelope, which she would deposit the following Monday.

Boone said she’d placed the envelope under the front seat of her car for safekeeping.

The day after the dance, a Sunday, Boone said she decided she’d deposit the money. She said she’d been told by a neighbour about a series of break-ins to vehicles in the area, and decided the money should go to the bank sooner rather than later.

“In my haste, I put it in the wrong bank,” Boone said, offering an explanation as to why an envelope containing receipts and not the money from the dance ended up at the CIBC.

Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.

Boone said she thought she may have sent the money out west by accident. She said she had sent some photos of one of her children to the father of the child, but thought she may have sent the money. She said after communication with the father, she determined the money had not gone west.

So from June 2007 to January 2009, the money remained missing.

But Boone made a startling revelation during her testimony.

It seems the vehicle she’d been driving at the time of the dance had been passed to her sister, then to her father, and in January 2009, was at her parents’ home.

Boone said she had been trying to retrace her steps, contacting anyone she may have dealt with in June 2007 as she continued to try and locate the money.

Boone said she had gone to the vehicle and thoroughly searched it. She said under the trunk of the car, where the spare tire is kept, she located a file folder. According to Boone, the folder contained papers relating to her work on the Community Days committee. She said there was also an envelope containing a significant sum of money, which she said she realized was the money from the dance.

Boone said she had no explanation for how the envelope ended up in the trunk of her car.

“I wish I did,” she said.

Boone produced the envelope in court, to the surprise of Crown prosecutor Christopher Lavigne.

Lavigne told Judge Walsh he’d never seen the envelope before, and wouldn’t be able to consent to entering the envelope into evidence without an opportunity to examine the contents.

Upon examining the contents, Lavigne found the envelope contained $780.50. Of that total, $20.50 was what remained of a float Boone had the night of the dance. The rest was from ticket sales.

During cross-examination, Lavigne said he found it unusual that every bill in the envelope was dated 2004. Boone said she’d never taken the money out of the envelope after she found it, and had never looked at the dates on the bills.

In making final arguments, Boone’s lawyer, Brent Dickinson, said his client’s story was consistent throughout her testimony, despite the Crown’s attempts to poke holes in it.

While the judge agreed the story was consistent, he still found it troubling. “Her story is, quite frankly, fishy,” Judge Walsh said. “It raises a lot of alarm bells.”

But when giving his decision, Judge Walsh said he had reasonable doubt about Boone’s guilt.

“Can I reject her evidence outright?” the judge asked. “I find I can’t.”

Based on the reasonable doubt, Boone was found not guilty. Both Lavigne and Dickinson agreed the money should be returned to the Nackawic Community Days committee.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Kills Mother & His Own Daughter – Michigan

Third paragraph from the end reads:  “Donna Vanniekerk told Defense Attorney Lesley Kranenberg that her husband  ‘used to be kind and loving but he turned mean and vindictive’  after his father died in 2004. She said he had been seeing a therapist and taking medication for depression.

Paragraph five reads:  “Vanniekerk was found in a bed in the motel and arrested and now is charged with two counts of open murder. He listened Thursday as the first witnesses testified in his preliminary examination before Calhoun County District Court Judge John Holmes. Testimony will continue in September when a pathologist is expected to testify that Brenda Vanniekerk and her granddaughter Laura Vanniekerk died from an overdose of medication.”

http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/article/20090807/NEWS01/908070314/1002/NEWS01/Wife-testifies-against-man-in-slayings

Wife testifies against man in slayings

Trace Christenson • The Enquirer • August 7, 2009

As Johan Vanniekerk straddled his wife, hitting and choking her, she told him she couldn’t breathe.Advertisement

“I know,” Donna Vanniekerk remembers him saying, “because I am going to kill you tonight.”

“I started screaming and he started strangling me harder. He said, ‘Don’t worry about the girls. When I am done killing you, I am going to kill them, too.”

Johan Vanniekerk didn’t kill anyone that night, April 30, but the 41-year-old Fort Wayne, Ind., man is charged with the May 1 death of his mother, 72, and his daughter, 3, in a Marshall motel. Investigators have alleged that Vanniekerk assaulted his wife in their Fort Wayne apartment and then the next day drove his mother and daughter to Marshall, where they were killed in a motel room.

Vanniekerk was found in a bed in the motel and arrested and now is charged with two counts of open murder. He listened Thursday as the first witnesses testified in his preliminary examination before Calhoun County District Court Judge John Holmes. Testimony will continue in September when a pathologist is expected to testify that Brenda Vanniekerk and her granddaughter Laura Vanniekerk died from an overdose of medication.

Donna Vanniekerk said she and her husband had been married 12 years but the relationship had soured and the couple separated because of his depression.

On the night of April 30, she said her husband entered their apartment a few minutes after a male co-worker, who was repairing some computers, had left.

“He took me down the hall and he put me on the bed,” Donna Vanniekerk told Prosecutor Susan Mladenoff. “He climbed on top of me and started hitting me and strangling me.”

A few minutes later the assault stopped and she said her husband made her promise he could move back with her and their three daughters and they would be together. She said she decided to act normally “because I thought I was dead and he was going to kill me and the girls.”

The next morning she prepared to go to work, took Laura to the apartment of her mother-in-law Brenda Vanniekerk, who provided child care, and then took the two older girls to school. There, an administrator called police and later Johan Vanniekerk realized the authorities were involved.
(2 of 2)

The couple exchanged some phone calls and text messages but when Donna Vanniekerk and the police went to Brenda Vanniekerk’s apartment, they found she and her granddaughter were gone.

At 4:15 p.m. that Friday, Donna Vanniekerk received a text message from her husband which said “we have reached the point of no return,” and then another which said “this is all your fault, you have no one to blame but yourself.”

She continued to call her husband and, when he finally answered, she asked about her mother-in-law.

“She is already dead,” she said her husband replied.

And when Donna Vanniekerk asked about Laura, her daughter, he said, “she is dead, too.”

“I started screaming and said she is my baby. He said, ‘not anymore,’ and hung up.”

Donna Vanniekerk told Defense Attorney Lesley Kranenberg that her husband “used to be kind and loving but he turned mean and vindictive” after his father died in 2004. She said he had been seeing a therapist and taking medication for depression.

Marshall Patrol Officer Andrew Groeneveld testified he was one of several officers to enter two rooms rented by Vanniekerk at the Comfort Inn in Marshall.

Groeneveld said in the room he entered shortly after 5:30 p.m., they found Vanniekerk on one bed, with labored breathing, and the child already dead on another bed.

Trace Christenson can be reached at 966-0685 or tchrist@battlecr.gannett .

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12/30/2000 – McDermott on Prozac, Paxil AND Deseryl?

If the Boston Herald’s source got it right, McDermott was on one heck of a
combo!!! All three are contraindicated in mixing any of the three with even
one of the others, much less two!! His serotonin levels must have been out of
sight using three serotonergic meds! No one should be surprised that he went
psychotic on this combination, even if the drugs were given in succession,
rather than together.

Let me also point out that the so called “Prozac defense” HAS been used
successfully several times. And as far as I know Kip Kinkle’s attorney never
used the information on the drugs in his murder case.

Prozac would also have been found guilty in a case that is almost identical
this one – that of Joseph Wesbecker in Louisville, KY, who also after being
treated with Prozac went on a shooting spree with an AK47 where he worked.
That is it would have been used successfully if Eli Lilly had not bought off
the plaintiffs in the middle of the trial and then neglected to disclose that
payoff to both the judge and the jurors. Judge John Potter deserves a metal
for taking Lilly and the plaintiffs to court and forcing them to admit the
truth of what happened. Although it took him a couple of years he said that
he did it because he did not want his courtroom turned into an advertising
agency for Prozac and pointed out that this is a public safety issue.
Amazingly Lilly has used that case to defend their drug ever since! (Although
my book discusses the Wesbecker case briefly, the book Power to Harm covers
the Wesbecker case in detail.)

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org
________________________________

“According to the source, who is familiar with the still mounting case,
McDermott had been taking Paxil, Prozac and Desyrel – all of which are SSRIs
designed to treat depression, social phobias or anxiety.”

Source: Suspect was taking drugs for depression

by Dave Wedge, Tom Farmer and Jose Martinez
Friday, December 29, 2000

The hulking computer technician accused of gunning down seven of his
co-workers at a Wakefield high-tech firm this week suffered from a host of
mental illnesses – including schizophrenia – for which he was taking a trio
of antidepressants, a source told the Herald yesterday.

Accused killer Michael M. McDermott at his arraignment Wednesday. (Staff
photo by Matthew West) “He’s got some serious psychological issues and a
long (psychiatric) history,” the source said of 42-year-old Michael
“Mucko” McDermott.

McDermott, a divorced Navy veteran from Marshfield who lived most recently in
Haverhill, suffered from severe depression, paranoia and schizophrenia, and
had been in psychiatric treatment for some time, according to the source who
spoke on condition of anonymity.

To cope with his mental disorders, McDermott was prescribed several Selective
Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, or SSRIs, designed to increase brain
serotonin. Low levels of brain serotonin can lead to depression and anxiety
disorders.

A source familiar with the investigation said McDermott’s supervisors at
Edgewater Technology Inc. did not appear to know he was using the medication.

McDermott is being held without bail on seven counts of first-degree murder
in Tuesday’s massacre at Edgewater. Prosecutors have said McDermott wielded a
shotgun and semiautomatic rifle with premeditated precision and extreme
atrocity, hunting down workers in the company’s accounting and human
resources offices but letting others flee unharmed.

He was arrested by police who found him sitting in the lobby near the bodies
of two of his victims. At least two Edgewater employees witnessed the
rampage, including one woman who hid behind a chair and her coat beneath a
desk in the accounting office, where two of her co-workers were killed.

Middlesex County District Attorney Martha Coakley has said McDermott may have
been seeking vengeance over the impending docking of his paychecks by
Edgewater to satisfy an IRS demand for back taxes. Sources say the IRS orders
would have left McDermott with just $275 every two weeks.

But investigators also are looking for clues about what drove the man to kill
by delving into the contents of computers seized from McDermott’s office and
home, where police also found bomb-making literature and materials. One
source said McDermott had attempted to wipe out the hard drive of his office
computer the day of the shootings.

Yesterday, neither Coakley nor McDermott’s defense attorney, Kevin
Reddington, would discuss the case or McDermott’s mental state and
psychological history. However, at Wednesday’s arraignment, Reddington raised
the specter of an insanity defense by saying his client had been seeing
psychiatrists and asking the judge to OK his continued medication.

Insanity defenses rarely succeed. The so-called Prozac defense has been
unsuccessfully attempted in dozens of murder cases nationwide, including in
the case of Kip Kinkel, the teenager who killed his family and two
schoolmates in Springfield, Ore.

According to the source, who is familiar with the still mounting case,
McDermott had been taking Paxil, Prozac and Desyrel – all of which are SSRIs
designed to treat depression, social phobias or anxiety.

The source also said orders have been sent by doctors to the Middlesex County
Sheriff’s office so McDermott can receive his medications in the Cambridge
jail. He will be examined by psychiatrists some time in the next week, the
source said.

The revelations about McDermott’s psychiatric history emerged as his
co-workers returned to St. Joseph’s Church – where so many of them had sought
refuge and solace in the hours after the shootings – for a memorial service
in honor of their seven slain colleagues.

“We’re all hurting and grieving, but I can’t tell you how much we’re pulling
together as a team,” Edgewater Technology Chief Executive Officer Shirley
Singleton said after meeting with her employees for the first time since the
shootings.

The company has started a memorial fund for the families of the slain workers
with a $70,000 donation. Singleton also said grief counseling, which began
yesterday at the firm, would continue as long as employees need help.

She declined to discuss the shootings that claimed the lives of Jennifer
Bragg Capobianco, 29; Janice Hagerty, 46; Louis Javelle, 58; Rose Manfredi,
48; Paul Marceau, 36; Cheryl Troy, 50, and Craig Wood, 29.

State and federal authorities are seeking the origin of McDermott’s weapons,
including the AK-47-style rifle and 12-gauge shotgun that he is alleged to
have used to kill the four women and three men, a .32-caliber pistol found in
his pants pocket and a large-caliber hunting rifle found in a locker by his
desk.

Haverhill police began looking for McDermott late Christmas Eve after someone
reported hearing gunfire in the woods near Crystal Lake, where a man fitting
his description was spotted by a car with the license plate “MUCKO.”
Officers traced the car back to McDermott’s apartment but could not locate
him despite several more visits Christmas Day.

One day later, investigators believe McDermott lugged the weapons unnoticed
into the Harvard Mills complex, one law enforcement source said. Two
soft-sided gun cases were found under his desk.

“He walked them right in and placed them under his desk,” the source said.
“They had a skeleton crew working that day and no one apparently saw him or
recognized what the cases were for.”

The source said McDermott loaded the shotgun with buckshot at his work
station before embarking on his killing spree. The source, a longtime
investigator, said the carnage he witnessed in the shooting’s aftermath left
him shaken.

“I was sick to my stomach over it,” he said. “It was unlike any other
murder scene because it was in a work setting. It was almost surreal. One of
the (dead) women had her head resting on her arm like she knew she was going
to get it.”

Meanwhile, gun control advocates held a rally outside the State House to urge
lawmakers to ban the sale of assault weapons like McDermott’s. Although
Massachusetts already has the country’s toughest gun law, it does not ban the
sale of assault weapons manufactured before September 1994.

“They have no legitimate use in a civilized society other than for law
enforcement,” said Stop Handgun Violence co-founder John E. Rosenthal.

Kevin Sowyrda, spokesman for the Gun Owners Action League, declined to
comment specifically on an assault weapon ban but said, “The last thing we
need in this period of mourning are political rallies.”

Donations may be made to the Edgewater Wakefield Memorial Foundation, Box
2133, Wakefield, Mass. 01880-6133. Donations may also be made at Fleet bank
branches.

Karen E. Crummy contributed to this report.

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