Lawsuits for Serious SSRI Birth Defects are Frequent

wide eyed baby pic

Lawsuits for Serious SSRI Birth Defects are Frequent

There are currently so many SSRI birth defect lawsuits that have been filed by families whose infants have been born with these defects that the cases are being consolidated in a massive legal action in the federal court system.

Among the health problems that women claim were caused in their infants because of the use of SSRIs during pregnancy are:

* A life-threatening lung condition known as – Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn
*Club Foot
*Cleft Palate
*Cleft Lip
*Ventricular septal malformation
*Omphalocele
*Tetralogy of Fallot
*Limb deformities
*Genital defects
*Heart defects
*Abnormal intestinal defects
*Hydrocephalus
*Atrial septal defect
*Ventral septal defect

Now, the findings of a new study published in the British Medical Journal show that patients taking SSRIs may be at higher risk of developing an abnormal heart beat than patients who take other medications.

[What they are talking about here is the long QT interval that I have been discussing for years and included much information on this in the 2000 edition of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare.]

Among the birth defects identified in these SSRI lawsuits are nearly every one of the complaints the mothers had listed:

*Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn
*Heart defects
*Ventricular septal malformation
*Atrial septal defect
*Tetralogy of Fallot
*Cleft lip
*Cleft palate
*Club foot
*Omphalocele
*Limb deformities
*Genital defects
*Abnormal intestinal defects
*Hydrocephalus

In the new research linking SSRIs to increased risk of stroke, the findings of the research, which were published in the journal Neurology, the scientists found that the increased risk of stroke occurs most often during the first few weeks of treatment.

I will follow this up with new research just out that will demonstrate serious problems for the mother after pregnancy due to her use of antidepressants.

– See more at: http://www.resource4thepeople.com/defectivedrugs/SSRI-Birth-Defects.html#sthash.0BfFrwpA.dpuf

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!

 

 

 

– See more at: http://www.resource4thepeople.com/defectivedrugs/SSRI-Birth-Defects.html#sthash.0BfFrwpA.dpuf

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Cold turkeyed off Effexor and Etrafon

“I continue to cite your book to all I can reach. I believe in you, and thank you so very much!”

I’ve read “PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA?” with great interest after your first “Art Bell” show. I was fortunate to be able to tape the second show with B. Simpson.

Thanks to your efforts, I now have all the support I need to warn friends about the pitfalls of these drugs.

My story:

Long term depression. Working physical job at printing outfit. Duties included fork lift driving. I went to the doctor for some relief; he prescribed Effexor, and Etrafon-forte.

My most pronounced side effect became noticeable to my wife; the persona of pure apathy.

Her father was killed in a car accident, and at the funeral, I couldn’t cry- became ultra-spiritual about his role in “the afterlife.” He was a Salvation Army officer and musician in the string band. He was loved by everyone. I miss him, but I do feel his presence even today; four years after my cold turkey episode.

My personal hell came in the form of unwanted thoughts that, without a firm spiritual background, I might have acted upon- as some of the examples presented in your case studies.

I decided that the drugs were the cause of my thoughts, and just stopped taking them one day. Things got worse, and I resorted to a relapse to drinking after a four year sobriety.

My drinking took off to three day binges, and I assaulted my loving wife while in a blackout.

Iwas jailed, and went through treatment. Over a six year period I’ve had three such episodes, but remain free of the SSRI’s. I’ve found relief with Librium, but they tapered me off of it while in the last treatment. I now feel totally lost, and have all the physical problems of stress, including fibro myalgia. I am now self employed making furniture.

I just got on the net at home, and wish to thank you for your insight-full work exposing this problem. I continue to cite your book to all I can reach. I believe in you, and thank you so very much!

Yours in central MN

Jon Allen
hihat02@yahoo.com

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Accutane, with Black Box Warning for suicide, is still worth trying???

Zit Face

Accutane, with Black Box Warning for suicide, is still worth trying???

According to an article in the Daily Mail written by a doctor the drug given for acne “Acutance is still worth trying” … a deadly drug with a Black Box Warning for suicide!

My opinion? I am absolutely appalled that the Daily Mail would stoop so low as to print such rubbish! Talk about a drug infomercial! Anyone with a functioning brain who can read research knows full well how Accutane produces depression and suicide – it produces drastic drops in blood sugar long known to be involved not only in depression, but many psychiatric symptoms.

Accutane is an extremely dangerous drug known to produce suicide, birth defects and many other serious reactions and what is worse is there is absolutely no need for it. All anyone with acne needs to do is use simple natural products that are safe. One of the best would be ionic silver, one of the best antibiotics ever known to man. Why risk one’s life and health by using such a deadly and dangerous drug that carries a Black Box Warning for suicide?

Original article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2396167/Its-linked-suicide–acne-drug-Roaccutane-worth-trying.html

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

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Medical News Today: Antidepressants Produce Long-Term Depression

We read in the article below the following statements about long-term use of antidepressants producing long-term depression & withdrawal. Now all these researchers had to do to learn this sooner was read the research in my book when the first edition came out almost 20 years ago. Once again I repeat that the hypothesis behind antidepressants is INCORRECT/BACKWARDS!! And if the hypothesis is backwards the drugs are going to CAUSE what we are being told that they cure!
“. . . there are reasons to believe that antidepressant treatment itself may contribute to a chronic depressive syndrome. . .
In other words, prolonged exposure to antidepressants can induce neuroplastic changes that result in the genesis of antidepressant-induced dysphoric symptoms. The investigators propose the term ‘tardive dysphoria’ to describe such a phenomenon and describe diagnostic criteria for it. Tapering or discontinuing the antidepressant might reverse the dysphoric state. Antidepressant discontinuation may not provide immediate relief. In fact, it is likely that transient symptoms of withdrawal will occur in the initial 2-4 weeks following antidepressant discontinuation or tapering. However, after a prolonged period of antidepressant abstinence, one may see a gradual return to the patient’s baseline.”
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.orgAuthor: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of
Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I
Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!
 
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/218435.php
A New Troublesome Long-Term Effect Of Antidepressant Drugs; Tardive Dysphoria.
Editor’s Choice
Main Category: Depression
Also Included In: Psychology / Psychiatry
Article Date: 08 Mar 2011 – 0:00 PST

Treatment-resistantdepression (TRD) may be related to inadequate dosing of antidepressants or antidepressant tolerance. Alternatively, there are reasons to believe that antidepressant treatment itself may contribute to a chronic depressive syndrome. This study reports a case of antidepressant discontinuation in a TRD patient, a 67-year-old white man with onset of major depressive illness at the age of 45. He was homozygous for the short form of the serotonin transporter. He was treated off and on until the age of 59 and had been on an antidepressant continuously until the age of 67. Over the previous 2 years he had been depressed without any relief by medication or 2 electroconvulsive treatments. His medications at the time of evaluation included paroxetine 10 mg daily, venlafaxine 75 mg daily and clonazepam 3 mg daily. His 17-item Hamilton depression score was 22. Over the subsequent 6 months, he was started on bupropion and then tapered off all antidepressants, including the bupropion. His Hamilton depression score dropped to 18. The patient was not satisfied with his progress and sought another opinion to restart antidepressants. One year later, on duloxetine 60 mg daily, he continued to complain of unremitting depression.

A possible prodepressant effect of antidepressants has been previously proposed. Fava was the first to suggest that an antidepressant-related neurobiochemical mechanism of increasing vulnerability to depression might play a role in worsening the long-term outcome of the illness. Understanding of potential mechanisms of this phenomenon can be gleaned from observations regarding the short form of the serotonin transporter (5HTTR). Patients with the short form of the 5HTTR and prolonged antidepressant exposure, may be particularly vulnerable to antidepressant-related worsening. In other words, prolonged exposure to antidepressants can induce neuroplastic changes that result in the genesis of antidepressant-induced dysphoric symptoms. The investigators propose the term ‘tardive dysphoria’ to describe such a phenomenon and describe diagnostic criteria for it. Tapering or discontinuing the antidepressant might reverse the dysphoric state. Antidepressant discontinuation may not provide immediate relief. In fact, it is likely that transient symptoms of withdrawal will occur in the initial 2-4 weeks following antidepressant discontinuation or tapering. However, after a prolonged period of antidepressant abstinence, one may see a gradual return to the patient’s baseline.

Source: Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, AlphaGalileo Foundation.

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Power Naps Boost Brainpower

For those of you who have read my book Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare with the extensive information on the great importance of sleep this report will be no surprise at all. It is always nice to have a confirmation of the information though. I thought it quite interesting to note that these researchers found that a nap can dramatically boost and restore your brainpower, refresh the mind, improve one’s capacity to learn, and make you smarter while to the contrary staying up late to cram for a test can decrease ability to learn by almost 40%! The more hours we stay awake the more sluggish our minds become. This makes it easy to understand why antidepressants, which produce so much insomnia and other sleep disorders, prevent you from learning and produce so much memory loss! Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director, International Coalition for Drug Awareness www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.orgAuthor: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant! http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/02/22/power-naps-boost-brainpower/11615.html Power Naps Boost Brainpower By RICK NAUERT PHD Senior News Editor Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on February 22, 2010 New research suggests an hour’s nap can dramatically boost and restore your brainpower. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley discovered a nap can not only refresh the mind, but make you smarter. Conversely, the more hours we spend awake, the more sluggish our minds become, according to the findings. The results support previous data from the same research team that pulling an all-nighter – a common practice at college during midterms and finals –- decreases the ability to cram in new facts by nearly 40 percent, due to a shutdown of brain regions during sleep deprivation. “Sleep not only rights the wrong of prolonged wakefulness but, at a neurocognitive level, it moves you beyond where you were before you took a nap,” said Matthew Walker, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and the lead investigator of these studies. In the recent UC Berkeley sleep study, 39 healthy young adults were divided into two groups – nap and no-nap. At noon, all the participants were subjected to a rigorous learning task intended to tax the hippocampus, a region of the brain that helps store fact-based memories. Both groups performed at comparable levels. At 2 p.m., the nap group took a 90-minute siesta while the no-nap group stayed awake. Later that day, at 6 p.m., participants performed a new round of learning exercises. Those who remained awake throughout the day became worse at learning. In contrast, those who napped did markedly better and actually improved in their capacity to learn. These findings reinforce the researchers’ hypothesis that sleep is needed to clear the brain’s short-term memory storage and make room for new information, said Walker, who presented his findings at the annual meeting of the American Association of the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in San Diego, Calif. Since 2007, Walker and other sleep researchers have established that fact-based memories are temporarily stored in the hippocampus before being sent to the brain’s prefrontal cortex, which may have more storage space. “It’s as though the e-mail inbox in your hippocampus is full and, until you sleep and clear out those fact e-mails, you’re not going to receive any more mail. It’s just going to bounce until you sleep and move it into another folder,” Walker said. In the latest study, Walker and his team have broken new ground in discovering that this memory-refreshing process occurs when nappers are engaged in a specific stage of sleep. Electroencephalogram tests, which measure electrical activity in the brain, indicated that this refreshing of memory capacity is related to Stage 2 non-REM sleep, which takes place between deep sleep (non-REM) and the dream state known as Rapid Eye Movement (REM). Previously, the purpose of this stage was unclear, but the new results offer evidence as to why humans spend at least half their sleeping hours in Stage 2, non-REM, Walker said. “I can’t imagine Mother Nature would have us spend 50 percent of the night going from one sleep stage to another for no reason,” Walker said. “Sleep is sophisticated. It acts locally to give us what we need.” Walker and his team will go on to investigate whether the reduction of sleep experienced by people as they get older is related to the documented decrease in our ability to learn as we age. Finding that link may be helpful in understanding such neurodegenerative conditions as Alzheimer’s disease, Walker said. Source: University of California, Berkeley

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Girl (11) From Bedwetting to Agitation & Psychotic Break

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

What a TRAGIC case and all too common! It compares with the
case of the 15 year old girl given Zoloft for warts – yes warts – and ended up
committing suicide. Of course Pfizer tried as hard as they could, albeit
unsuccessfully, to convince the court in her wrongful death suit that it
was the warts that drove her to suicide, not the Zoloft! And this case is also
very similar to the case of the little girl I discuss in my book, “Prozac:
Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” who was given Prozac because as
an A student it was felt she spent too much time doing homework! (I thought that
was how you became an A student!) She was described before the meds as an
excellent student and well behaved child.  Yet, within days on
Prozac she was throwing herself downstairs. They then took her off the meds
and then put her back on the meds at higher doses and the Yale
study ends with her pulling her hair out and being locked in a psych
ward where she would jump up and down on her Teddy Bear screaming “Kill, kill!
Die, Die!” As I have asked for years, how many productive and caring lives have
we cut off from us all by these deadly drugs?!
Paragraph three reads:  “He also includes the stories of
individual patients, all of whom fared poorly on psychiatric medications and did
better after coming off them. One was of a young woman from Seattle
prescribed an antidepressant at age 11 to treat her bed-wetting, who then became
agitated and spiraled into full-blown psychosis.
When Whitaker met her
at age 21 she was living in a group home for the severely mentally ill, mute,
and withdrawn. Her story is heartbreaking, and the implication is that her
deterioration was triggered by the medications she was given.”

http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2010/04/14/tying_the_rise_in_mental_illness_to_drugs_used_in_its_treatment/

Tying the rise in mental illness to drugs used in its treatment

By Dennis
Rosen

April 14, 2010

ANATOMY OF AN EPIDEMIC: Magic Bullets,
Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America
By
Robert Whitaker

Crown, 416 pp., $26

In “Anatomy of an Epidemic’’
Whitaker presents his theory that the dramatic increase in mental illness in the
United States since World War II is the direct result of the medicines
psychiatrists have been prescribing to treat it, and that this itself stems from

an unholy alliance between the pharmaceutical industry and corrupt physicians.
However, although extensively researched and drawing upon hundreds of sources,
the gaps in his theory remain too large for him to succeed in making a
convincing argument.

Whitaker cites studies showing better outcomes for
patients with depression or schizophrenia who have come off their medications
than for those who have stayed on them, but doesn’t consider the possibility
that this may be because those with milder disease recovered and no longer
needed medications, while those who were sicker to begin with simply could not
do without them.

He also includes the stories of individual patients, all
of whom fared poorly on psychiatric medications and did better after coming off
them. One was of a young woman from Seattle prescribed an antidepressant at age
11 to treat her bed-wetting, who then became agitated and spiraled into
full-blown psychosis. When Whitaker met her at age 21 she was living in a group
home for the severely mentally ill, mute, and withdrawn. Her story is
heartbreaking, and the implication is that her deterioration was triggered by
the medications she was given.

But how can one be certain of this?
Perhaps she was destined for mental illness through a combination of her genes
and the environment in the same way that some children develop cancer,
irrespective of any medications they may be taking. Perhaps without the
medications given to treat her psychosis her course would have been even worse.
Many children are treated with tricyclics for bed-wetting and the vast majority
do fine. A single case does not prove the rule, and here lies the basic problem
of this book. As Whitaker himself points out, there simply are not enough data

from well-designed, trustworthy studies. And without this information, it is
impossible to conclude anything meaningful about cause and effect.

Though
there remain unanswered questions about the efficacy of some psychiatric
medications in some patients and their long-term consequences, there is no
denying that they have brought about a huge improvement in quality of life for
millions. While it is reasonable for Whitaker to raise his concerns, it is
critical to remember that hypothesis is no substitute for data.

Ignoring
this can lead to disastrous consequences, such as occurred in South Africa at
the turn of this century. Thabo Mbeki, then president of that country, refused

to accept that AIDS was caused by the HIV virus, believing instead that it was a
side effect of malnutrition and the medications used to treat AIDS itself. In
the absence of an effective treatment and prevention program, it is estimated
that 365,000 South Africans died prematurely of AIDS between the years 2000-05
(currently, 18.1 percent of South African adults have HIV/AIDS).

Those
who would seize the opportunity to cast psychiatry as a discipline into the
rubbish heap without consideration for the benefits it has brought to so many
would do well to remember how Mbeki’s inability to distinguish between theory
and fact exacted such an enormous toll in human life and
suffering.

Dr. Dennis Rosen is a pediatric lung and sleep specialist
at Children’s Hospital Boston and an instructor in pediatrics at Harvard Medical
School.
[]
© Copyright 2010 Globe Newspaper
Company.

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Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion So Far to Settle Various Paxil Lawsuits

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Excellent article! Many would still be alive and many more
would have avoided being damaged had they been able to see this coming as
clearly as I did years ago when I began warning about these drugs. But it is not
over! There will tragically be many more losses due to the ability of drug
manufacturers to buy the silence this doctor from Tufts says below should
not happen. These settlements need to be made public!

The one glaring omission in this article is a case I am very
familiar with Tobin vs Glaxo. This Paxil-induced murder/suicide
case was allowed to go to court, rather than being settled by Glaxo.
And after hearing all the evidence the jury ruled
that it was clear that Paxil was the main cause of this tragic
murder/suicide that cost 4 lives in one WY family. They ordered Glaxo to pay
$6.3 Million – in my opinion a very small amount for four lives!

But it will not be the end of these types of cases being filed.
The authors did not figure the losses Glaxo will face from those cases
of murder/suicide so their losses could be far greater than detailed
below.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepresant!

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings
the number of suicide, birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because
it raises the red flag for both doctors and patients that there might be a
problem,” said Dan Carlat, a psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine
in Boston who writes and edits a
blog and a monthly

Psychiatry
Report
. “It would motivate
doctors to dig into the literature even more before prescribing these
drugs.”

  • About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
    haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
    600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.
  • A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million
    to the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after
    his mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst
    estimated the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect
    cases waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.
  • 600 More Cases
  • “A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
    Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
    Kilker verdict.
  • In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
    combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
    200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to
    pay $4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn
    painkiller.
  • Harris Pogust, an
    attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
    are confidential.
  • The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old
    boy who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham,
    of Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged
    Glaxo suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide
    attempts by adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court
    papers.
  • The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
    attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
    confidential.
  • About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average
    of about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an
    average of $300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits
    were filed, according to the people familiar with the matter.
  • Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a
    Houston-based lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in
    court Dec. 2. The settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar
    with the cases said.
  • Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200
    claims linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases
    said.
  • In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
    “conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who
    alleged they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case,
    filed in Los Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in
    February.
Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion to Settle Paxil

Lawsuits

By Jef Feeley and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) — GlaxoSmithKline Plc has
paid almost $1 billion to resolve lawsuits over Paxil since it introduced the
antidepressant in 1993, including about $390 million for suicides or attempted
suicides said to be linked to the drug, according to court records and people
familiar with the cases.

As part of the total, Glaxo, the U.K.’s largest drugmaker, so far has paid
$200 million to settle Paxil addiction and birth-defect cases and $400 million

to end antitrust, fraud and design claims, according to the people and court
records.

The $1 billion “would be worse than many people are expecting,” said Navid Malik, an analyst
at Matrix Corporate Capital in London. “I don’t think this is within the
boundaries of current assumptions for analysts.”

The London-based company hasn’t disclosed the settlement total in company
filings. It has made public some accords. Glaxo’s provision for legal and other
non-tax disputes as of the end of 2008 was 1.9 billion pounds ($3.09 billion),
according to its latest annual report. This included all legal matters, not just
Paxil. The company said 112 million pounds of this sum would be “reimbursed by
third-party issuers.”

The drugmaker has reduced its insurance coverage to contain costs, “accepting
a greater degree of uninsured exposure,” the annual report states. “Recent
insurance loss experience, including pharmaceutical product-liability exposures,
has increased the cost of, and narrowed the coverage afforded by, insurance for
pharmaceutical companies generally,” Glaxo said.

Glaxo Comment

Glaxo declined to confirm the $1 billion figure. “Paxil has been on the
market in the U.S. since 1993. Like many other pharmaceutical products, it has
been the subject of different kinds of litigation over the years,” said Sarah Alspach, a
spokeswoman for Glaxo, in an e-mailed statement. “It would be inappropriate and
potentially misleading to aggregate payments in these various types of
litigation.”

Chief Executive Officer Andrew Witty has moved
to replace revenue lost to generic versions of drugs such as Paxil. Worldwide,
Paxil generated about 514 million pounds in sales last year, or 2.1 percent of
the total. Glaxo closed up 5 pence to 1,303 pence in London trading Dec. 11,
down 8.8 percent from a year ago.

About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.

A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million to

the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after his
mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst estimated
the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect cases
waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.

600 More Cases

“A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
Kilker verdict. He still recommended buying Glaxo shares because a likely appeal
may reduce the amount paid by the company.

In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to pay
$4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn painkiller.

Harris Pogust, an
attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
are confidential.

Paxil Is Different

Paxil’s been different from most drugs,” said Pogust, a lawyer from
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, who is handling suicide and withdrawal cases.
“You’ve had three major personal injury litigations over one drug — the
suicide, the birth defect and the withdrawal cases. To have three significant
problems with one drug is really unusual.”

The company had $11.7 billion in U.S. Paxil sales for nine years starting in
1997, according to documents made public this year in a Pennsylvania trial. In
2002, the year before Paxil faced generic competition in the U.S., sales of the
drug there were $2.12 billion. Last year, U.S. sales had fallen to $129 million.
Through September of this year, sales were $52 million, down 52 percent from the
same period in 2008.

Since at least 2003, Glaxo has faced claims in U.S. courts that some Paxil
users were subjected to an undisclosed, higher risk for suicide and birth
defects.

A Suicide Settlement

The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old boy
who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham, of
Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged Glaxo

suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide attempts by
adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court papers.

The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
confidential.

About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average of
about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an average of
$300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits were filed,
according to the people familiar with the matter.

Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a Houston-based
lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in court Dec. 2. The
settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar with the cases said.

Hasn’t Specified

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings the number of suicide,
birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because it raises the red flag
for both doctors and patients that there might be a problem,” said Dan Carlat, a
psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston who writes and
edits a blog and a monthly Psychiatry Report. “It would motivate doctors to dig into the
literature even more before prescribing these drugs.”

Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200 claims
linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases said.

In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
“conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who alleged
they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case, filed in Los
Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in February.

Glaxo did not admit liability” in the addiction settlements, the company’s
officials said in a March 2009 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange
Commission.

The Other $400 Million

In one of eight accords unrelated to individual suicide, addiction or
birth-defect claims, Glaxo agreed in 2003 to pay $87.6 million to the U.S. and
49 states over claims it repackaged and privately labeled Paxil and another
drug, Flonase, to a health maintenance organization at discounted prices.

Glaxo, denying liability, agreed in 2004 to pay $165 million to settle two
antitrust suits over allegations it engaged in sham patent infringement
litigation to stall approval of generic versions of the drug, court records
show. Of that total, $100 million was for direct purchasers of Paxil, such as
drug wholesalers, and $65 million was for indirect buyers, the records show.

In the same year, Glaxo agreed to pay $2.5 million to New York to resolve
accusations the company withheld safety data about the antidepressant. The
company, calling the claims unfounded, agreed to release safety studies on the
medicine’s effect on children.

In 2005, the company added a black-box warning to its Paxil label that the
drug increased the risk of suicidal thoughts among adolescents, following a
request by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to do so.

The Philadelphia case is Kilker v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. dba
GlaxoSmithKline, 07-001813, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County,
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia).

To contact the reporters on this story: Jef Feeley in
Wilmington, Delaware, at jfeeley@bloomberg.net and; Margaret Cronin Fisk in
Southfield, Michigan, at mcfisk@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated:
December 14, 2009 00:01 EST

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AMITRIPTYLINE: Murder: Mother Kills Baby: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Keep in mind that the tricyclic antidepressants, like Amitriptyline, (the cause
of this child’s death) Imipramine, etc. have been given to small children for
decades now for bed wetting!

These tricyclic antidepressants have an almost identical
effect in increasing serotonin levels. When you interfere with the metabolism of
serotonin you increase the level of serotonin because it then begins to back up
causing serotonin levels to rise. (See the chapter “Serotonin Doubletalk” in the
book “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” to learn the
amazing deception behind the serotonin reuptake theory.
)
In fact Amitriptyline interferes with the
metabolism of serotonin at anywhere from 21% – 37% depending on the study
you refer to. In comparison one of the newest and most powerful SSRI
antidepressants, Celexa, interferes with serotonin metabolism at the
rate of 29%. They are very similar in this respect.
When serotonin metabolism is interfered with, thus producing
increases in serotonin levels, many adverse reactions can occur. As you keep in
mind that the main function of serotonin is constriction of smooth muscle
tissue, such as the bronchial tubes, all the major organs of the body, you can
quickly understand why this little child could no longer breathe. High levels of
Amitriptyline would have interfered with the metabolism of serotonin to the
extent as to shut the lungs down due to the high levels of serotonin
backing up in his system. The condition is known medically as Serotonin
Syndrome. And as you see from this case, Serotonin Syndrome can be
fatal.
Paragraph two reads:  “Laura-Jane Vestuto, 28, crushed
anti-depressant
pills prescribed to her

and
fed them to toddler Renzo.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/crime/article6825876.ece

From Times Online
September 8, 2009

Mother jailed for killing baby with antidepressants

Times Online

A mother was jailed for six years today
for killing her 20-month-old son by doping him to make him sleep.

Laura-Jane Vestuto, 28, crushed anti-depressant pills prescribed to her
and fed them to toddler Renzo.

She had been giving the medication to
Renzo for weeks before he developed breathing problems and died after being
taken to hospital in September 2007.

Tests showed the drug had built up
in his body and he had ten times the safe adult dose in his system, the Old
Bailey heard.

Traces of Amitriptyline were found on baby medicine
feeders but police believe he may have also been given the drug in his juice or
milk.

Judge Peter Thornton told Vestuto she had given Renzo sedatives to
make life easier for herself.

He said: “Instead of bearing the everyday
responsibility of being a parent, caring and loving for your son, you embarked
on a deliberate course of administering adult drugs, knowing that was wrong and
risky.

“You gave him drugs for purely selfish, self-centred reasons,
thinking only of yourself.”

The judge said Vestuto had been prescribed
the drug seven times in the months leading up to the boy’s death, but was not
taking it herself when Renzo died.

Traces of other drugs, including
painkillers, were also found in his system.

Judge Thornton added: “You
repeatedly administered these drugs, calmly and deliberately, knowing it was
wrong and not the way to care for children.”

He said Vestuto had shown
little emotion when her son died after being taken to hospital.

She had
compounded the suffering of her mother and former husband by denying given Renzo
the medication – and trying to throw the blame on them.

Sarah
Whitehouse, prosecuting, said Vestuto had been prescribed the drug for backache
and to make her sleep.

She told a neighbour that Renzo had been given
medicine by her GP to make him sleep while he was teething – but the doctor said
he was never consulted about teething problems.

Miss Whitehouse said it
was not possible to say how long Vestuto had been giving the drug to the boy.

Isabella Forshall, defending, said Vestuto had not intended to harm the
boy.

Miss Forshall said: “She meant it to help Renzo. There were a
number of small doses which suddenly overwhelmed poor Renzo.

“All she
wanted to be was a mum and housewife. Renzo was well-nourished and looked after.

“Like any parent, she was distressed when he was teething and miserable,
and that is why she took the step she did – a desperately reckless one.”

Vestuto, of Clapton, east London, pleaded guilty in July to causing or
allowing Renzo’s death.

An alternative charge of manslaughter was left
to lie on file after she pleaded not guilty.

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PROZAC: Woman Threatens State Patrolman: Missouri

HOW SAD!!! Reminds me of a talk I had with parents in Louisiana just last week who are completely overwhelmed dealing with a daughter with similar problems – ALL BECAUSE OF THE WIDESPREAD PRESCRIBING OF THESE DEADLY AND VERY ADDICTIVE PRESCRIPTION DRUGS!!!! They know she can get them from just about any doctor around.
Doctors have truly become our biggest drug pushers in this country! What on earth are we doing to our children?!!! How can so many families be left alone to deal with this – never knowing from one minute to the next if they are going to find their child unresponsive and dying due to yet another overdose of these drugs?
This country is in SO MUCH trouble and it has NOTHING to do with any outside threat to our nation – it is within.
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac (ETC): Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare! & Audio: Help! I Can’t Get Off
My Antidepressant/Antipsychotic, ect. ()
Paragraphs three & four read:  “According to the criminal complaint, when Parsley made contact with West  ‘her speech was slurred and her eyes were bloodshot and glassy.’  He adds that he did not notice an odor of intoxicants on her.”SSRI Stories note:  “

 

“West reportedly admitted she had taken Xanax and Prozac at 6 a.m. After failing sobriety tests, West was placed under arrest.”

Hostility”  is listed as an Infrequent, but not Rare, reaction to Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

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Antidepressant Romance Fuels “Premedicated” Murder

Note From Ann Blake-Tracy: I must say that in the 20 years I have been specializing in adverse reactions to antidepressants and lecturing and writing about these drugs this is possibly the best article I have ever read on the overall problem with antidepressants!! EXCELLENT WORK!!!
The only thing I might have added is that the hypothesis behind the serotonin THEORY (everyone keeps forgetting it is a theory and not a fact) is backwards. According to research serotonin is elevated in depression, anxiety, violence, mania, psychosis, etc. NOT low. What is low is the ability to metabolize serotonin.
Now enjoy the article! As I said, it is excellent!!
Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

Website: www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare
& CD or audio tape on safe withdrawal: “Help! I Can’t Get
Off My Antidepressant!”
Order Number:

August 17th, 2009

From The Desk of The People’s Chemist:

Are antidepressant’s a silent killer? Read more to learn how to avoid “Premedicated Murder.” Then visit my blog at http://www.thepeopleschemist.com/blog to leave your comments. I want to hear your voices on this! This is one of the most important articles I’ve ever written. Invest 6 minutes into your health by reading this.

Antidepressant Romance Fuels “Premedicated” Murder

By Shane “The People’s Chemist” Ellison

I wish medicine wasn’t so damn complicated. If it weren’t, people would see how Big Pharma cleverly plays prescription cupid to hook the masses into an antidepressant romance. Fueled by dreamy ads, sexy actors, and medical experts who get paid to give pharmaceutical fellatio, the romance has grown into a full-fledged orgy.

Antidepressants are among the best selling drugs, yet not one single diagnostic test supports their effectiveness. Romance makes for great business. But, are patients getting the love they deserve or are they facing another life threatening disaster akin to the Vioxx fiasco (killing an estimated 30,000 people who could have just used aspirin)? Perhaps the chemical facts behind antidepressants will give way to reality and help Americans sever ties to the deadly affair.

Life can be a bitch at times. Everyone knows it and Big Pharma profits from it. To answer our cries for happiness, they sell us a slew of molecules ripe with supposed happy atoms purported to elicit wanton pleasure. It’s a pipe dream. Like a parent who doesn’t like their daughter dating drug reps or psychiatrists, the FDA started using Black Box Warnings to inform us that, “Antidepressants, compared to placebo, increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children in short term studies.” Psychiatrists quickly refuted this.

Massaging our fears, Dr. McAllister-Williams of the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University publicly insisted that “I believe they work and have an acceptable risk: benefit ratio for many patients.” Taking his cue, psychiatrists from around the world did what they do best: Ignore scientific ethics and get on their knees for Big Pharma.

In a vulgar display of medical ineptitude, prescribing habits surged. From 1996 to 2006, use of antidepressants increased 50% among children, 73% among adults and a ghastly 100% among the elderly – so much for Black Box Warnings. Why not rename them Profit Warnings? As prescribing habits have surged, so has antidepressant reality.

The so called disease of a “serotonin” chemical imbalance among depressed patients has never been proven. The Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience recently reminded doctors that, “Brain serotonin cannot be directly measured” and that even in the deceased, “Serotonin levels are unstable, within 24 hours of death.” Therefore, “direct evidence that serotonin is low in depressed persons is unavailable.”

Panicked, psychiatry hypothesized yet another cause of a chemical imbalance: Bad genes. Apparently, select people (basically anyone with a heartbeat) have a defective gene that makes them susceptible to depression – and drugs, drugs and more drugs can save them from the scourge of sadness. Bio-babble like “alleles” and “transporter genes” were thrown around like condoms at a high school pep rally. The jargon confused everyone. And in their dizzy stupor, most were convinced that it must mean one thing: antidepressants are the Holy Grail to attaining happiness. Psychiatry was once again renewed with the stench of pharmaceutical pheromones. But it didn’t last.

Thanks to scientific methodology, the industry was slapped with the facts. The New York Times delivered the blow and wrote, “One of the most celebrated findings in modern psychiatry – that a single gene helps determine one’s risk of depression in response to a divorce, a lost job or another serious reversal – has not held up to scientific scrutiny.”

You don’t need science to disprove the antiquated, reductionist propaganda surrounding the chemical imbalance theory. You only need the common sense of a child.

The human brain floats in thousands, billions or maybe even trillions of brain chemicals – all working in orchestra like unison to confer proper brain function. Even serotonin exists not as a single molecule, but instead as an ever changing chemical cascade of 5-htp, niacin, L-tryptophan, quinolinate, kynurenine and more. You’d have to be Paris Hilton or a psychiatrist to miss this logic and adhere to the simplistic serotonin imbalance theory.

With no such thing as a chemical imbalance or “depression inducing genes,” psychiatry did what any organization would do in the face of impending demise: Get the U.S Government to do their dirty work.

Today, an insidious collusion between Big Pharma and Big Government is doling out drugs paid for by our tax dollars to foster children, to our U.S. Troops, and to the elderly at breakneck speeds. With so many being drugged, a harsh reality is emerging: Antidepressant romance fuels “premedicated murder.”

While researching my upcoming book, Over-The-Counter Natural Cures (SourceBooks, October), I uncovered stories of horrific suicide and rage that occurred after being medicated with antidepressants. But none more disturbing than the Chris Wood story. Doped up on his prescribed cocktail of antidepressants – all three of them – he shot his 33 year old wife Francie and their three children – Chandler, 5, Gavin, 4, and Fiona, 2. Shockingly, in his drug damaged mind, they weren’t “dead enough” and gruesome decapitation followed. Afterwards, he picked up a shotgun and killed himself. This isn’t an isolated incident.

Among our US troop, suicide and rage is at an all time high – in direct correlation to mass prescribing. The same trend exists among teens as seen by the ever growing act of spraying classmates with bullets. Psychiatrists don’t seem to be alarmed with these trends, or at all interested in seeing the obvious correlations. In an attempt to “leave no American un-medicated,” they encourage subjective mental screening tests for the rest of us as a means of converting healthy people into psychiatric patients.

Psychiatry wants to position antidepressants as the cure for the premedicated violence. So to counter the growing evidence that their drugs are the cause, they insist that, “The only evidence that would be acceptable is the demonstration in a double blind trial that a difference in suicide rates was consistently seen. There is no evidence at all for a differential suicide attempt rate with antidepressants. Suicidal thoughts are an integral part of depression.” Here comes the backhand.

Writing for the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. Joel Kauffman elucidates that combined clinical trials on antidepressants show five times the risk of suicide among the treated compared to placebo.

The suicide/aggression trend is not inexplicable from a chemistry viewpoint. Using the latest cloning techniques and laboratory methods, it’s been shown that antidepressants elicit “neurotransmitter hijacking.” This may be partially responsible for the mental state that causes a person to gruesomely murder their loved ones, then put a shotgun to their chin and pull the trigger.

Once swallowed, antidepressants sail past the blood brain barrier and congregate on top of “neurotransmitter recyclers.” This can prevent the cellular “recycling factories” from activating previously used neurotransmitters like serotonin or any of its chemical cousins. With nowhere to go, the inactive brain compounds get “hijacked” by recycling facilities found in other regions of the brain. This would be similar to a square peg being shoved into a round hole. As shown by Baylor College of Medicine, the recycling facilities of key neurotransmitters, like dopamine (round), begin to retrieve serotonin (square) into dopamine vesicles. A dastardly consequence ensues.

Commenting on the hijacking, CNN publicized that, “Antidepressant drugs actually create a perilous brain imbalance.” And Psychiatric Times hypothesized that blocking transporters on cell bodies could drop neurotransmitter levels in the synapse. Is it true?

To measure if neurotransmitter hijacking leads to an empty synapse, you can simply look for clinical manifestations of poor neurotransmitter function (like Parkinson’s disease, which is due to poor output of dopamine) among antidepressant users. As far back as 1995, the American Journal of Medicine showed that 37% of all prescriptions for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease are due to Psychiatric drug use. Case closed. These antidepressant actions are the exact opposite of the claimed “neurotransmitter boosting” actions purported by most doctors!

Once neurotransmitter hijacking takes place, pharmacopossession (due to poor neurotransmitter function) may also set in. As patients come fully under the spell of antidepressants, the brain can become so scrambled that all normal reality and reason are overwritten by a new confusing and violent agenda. A new personality arises – one with homicidal and suicidal tendencies. And for an ever increasing number of antidepressant users, these tendencies are manifesting as premedicated murder – the deliberate killing as a result of being medicated in advance.

Unbalanced by drugs, the brain of an antidepressant user faces a slew of mind altering outcomes. What kind? What was Chris Wood thinking and feeling prior to committing premedicated murder of his family while pharmacopossessed? To answer these questions just go back to the beginning of this article and read the “profit warning” that comes with every Prozac prescription. It’s all there in black and white.

Even though the FDA “compels” drug companies to warn the public about antidepressant risks, their “death grip” on the medical industry has kept doctors and patients from knowing the real extent of the danger. Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association said that “Pharma’s influence on medicine is so blatant now you’d have to be deaf, blind and dumb not to see it.” I guess psychiatrists are all three since they continue to ignore science and romance the masses with promises of happiness courtesy of antidepressants.

Before your doctor gives you an antidepressant, ask him to read you the Black Box Warning that comes with your prescription. This will ensure that the potential romance quickly gives way to reality and that you don’t succumb to premedicated murder.

About the Author

Shane Ellison’s entire career has been dedicated to the study of molecules – how they give life and how they take from it. He was a two-time recipient of the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Grant for his research in biochemistry and physiology. He is a best selling author, holds a master’s degree in organic chemistry, and has first-hand experience in drug design. Learn to get lean fast like is Mom (photos included) at http://www.ampmfatloss.com

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